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  • 2001
  • When the editors of Time screamed on the cover of their February 19, 2001 issue, "Human Cloning is Closer than You Think! (apologeticspress.org)
  • First, unlike the widely used NAS guidelines, the NIH draft guidelines apply these requirements to the stem cell lines that had been eligible for funding under President Bush's policy-namely, those that were in existence before August 9, 2001. (thehastingscenter.org)
  • After a heated debate about human cloning, on July 31, 2001, the U. S. House of Representatives voted 265-162 to institute a total federal ban on human cloning. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The German National Ethics Council, the 25-member body created in 2001 by the Federal Government to offer advice on ethical issues in the life sciences, announced on Monday that it would continue to oppose the cloning of human embryos for research. (dw.com)
  • With the stem-cell research in its infancy and massive government funding constrained by a policy enacted in August 2001, industry experts say the field is too risky, the business model too vague. (seattletimes.com)
  • Back on Aug. 9, 2001, Bush announced that researchers would be prohibited from using federal funds to perform embryonic stem-cell research on any stem-cell lines derived after 9 p.m. that day, a move that many researchers say significantly slowed progress in finding treatments for diseases. (wired.com)
  • Whatever one's view of the moral status of the embryo, it is difficult to understand the moral distinction between research on stem-cell lines created before 9 p.m. on Aug. 9, 2001, and research on stem-cell lines created since,' wrote five council members, Daniel Foster, Michael Gazzaniga, Janet Rowley, Michael Sandel and James Wilson. (wired.com)
  • dignity
  • Human lives, souls, and dignity are at stake! (apologeticspress.org)
  • The main purpose of these Guidelines is to present an accessible and consolidated ethics resource for biomedical researchers and members of ethics committees or institutional review boards (IRBs).The Guidelines are based on a review of the BAC's past recommendations, which aim to safeguard against unethical practices and to ensure the protection and assurance of the safety, health, dignity, welfare and privacy of research participants. (bioethics-singapore.org)
  • US president George Bush - a high-profile opponent of cloning and stem cell research - said: "The United States and the international community have now spoken clearly that human cloning is an affront to human dignity. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Do the 1 million Americans who suffer from Parkinson's disease, whose human dignity has been brutally robbed from them, feel an even greater affront? (wired.com)
  • therapies
  • In another scenario, genetically-customized stem cell lines would be generated for cell-based therapies to transplant to the patient. (bootstrike.com)
  • With these early translational grants CIRM has taken the first step in funding translational research that will be critical for the development of future therapies. (blogspot.com)
  • These stem cells would then be used for research and development of the sorts of medical therapies promised by proponents of stem cell research. (cnn.com)
  • The FDA has said it will consider allowing stem-cell therapies to be tested on a case-by-case basis, but it hasn't given the green light for a trial. (seattletimes.com)
  • Pathological conditions modify the microenvironment of stem cells (the so-called niche) preventing the activation of resident stem cells and reducing the success of exogenous cell therapies. (frontiersin.org)
  • Diabetes, by the way, has already been cured in mice using embryonic stem cell therapies, as has Parkinson's. (fightaging.org)
  • Senior study author Dr Dieter Egli said in the LA Times "This advance brings us a significant step closer to the development of cell replacement therapies. (christiantoday.com)
  • biological
  • From a biological classification viewpoint, is a human a mammal? (apologeticspress.org)
  • Think of what would not have been achieved had politics and religion stopped the scientific and education communities from affirming the biological links between humans and the rest of the animal kingdom. (baltimoresun.com)
  • 1) The aim of stem cell research is to produce a biological repair kit, tools that will allow age- and illness-damaged tissue to be repaired or replaced. (fightaging.org)
  • It is widely agreed that progress towards a full biological repair kit would be much faster due to embryonic stem cell research. (fightaging.org)
  • Many on the left argue that with cloning the new progeny become the ultimate shopping experience -- designed in advance, produced to specification and purchased in the biological marketplace. (alternet.org)
  • The research is considered deeply controversial because it could be regarded as an example of what has been termed 'therapeutic cloning' - where cloned humans are harvested for biological material, which the UN called on all members to ban in 2005. (christiantoday.com)
  • 2002
  • The announcement, which came after more than a year of study, reinforces a vote taken by the German parliament in 2002 that outlaws cloning. (dw.com)
  • The National Ethics Council had been set the task of investigating the nature of stem cell research by Chancellor Gerhard Schröder in late 2002. (dw.com)
  • The New York Times reported March 16 that lawmakers in at least six states were considering bills similar to the 2002 legislation in California authorizing research for therapeutic cloning of embryonic stem cells. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • The newly canonised Pope John Paul II said to the UN General Assembly on this subject in 2002: "These techniques, insofar as they involve the manipulation and destruction of human embryos, are not morally acceptable, even when their proposed goal is good in itself. (christiantoday.com)
  • patient's
  • If a patient's immune system is suppressed, he said, the standardized cells could be transplanted into random patients without being rejected by their immune systems. (seattletimes.com)
  • This is about reprogramming a patient's own cells, with their own genotype, with their own DNA that are immunologically matched to them and no one else, essentially. (christiantoday.com)
  • Harvard Stem Cell Institute
  • Doug Melton of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute who was not involved in this research, said in the Daily Mail, that despite this development representing an "impressive technical achievement", the techniques involved would be more likely used to create new cells for study, rather than a future source of transplant material. (christiantoday.com)
  • identical
  • This policy would make illegal not only the kind of cloning conjured up by Frankensteinian futurists who predict the creation of troops of identical humans to perform dangerous or evil tasks, or in which rich and narcissistic people use cloning to create identical copies of themselves born 30, 40, or even 50 years after the original. (cnn.com)
  • Reproductive cloning promises to give the rearing parents the kind of preferences never before possible in a baby, a baby identical genetically to a progenitor chosen by them, either one member of the couple or some one of their choice. (hubpages.com)
  • The human body occasionally clones a fertilized egg resulting in the birth of "identical twins. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • organs
  • Five piglets are cloned by a company the eventually wants to reproduce organs for humans. (infoplease.com)
  • subhuman creatures with usable organs but no head, no brain, no consciousness to identify them with the human family? (brightkite.com)
  • Some believe that it is possible to grow human organs outside a body, or perhaps in the body of another animal, that could then be harvested for transplanting into humans. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • Others believe that these cells could be manipulated so that rejection of organs could be reduced. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • regenerative medicine
  • It can be used in embryonic stem cell research, or in regenerative medicine where it is sometimes referred to as 'therapeutic cloning. (bootstrike.com)
  • With more than two million page views and more than 4,500 items, this blog provides news and commentary on public policy, business and economic issues related to the $3 billion California stem cell agency, officially known as the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine(CIRM). (blogspot.com)
  • Personally, I think it's nuts that medical progress towards working regenerative medicine has been so held up and slowed by politicians and the regulatory impulse that the approval of a single therapeutic cloning research project aimed at curing diabetes makes world news. (fightaging.org)
  • process
  • The integrity of the research process is of increasing importance given the competitiveness in research. (bioethics-singapore.org)
  • It can also be used as the first step in the process of reproductive cloning. (bootstrike.com)
  • As the powerhouses of cells, the correct assembly of mitochondria is vital for power to be generated, a process that relies on numerous interactions between nuclear DNA and mtDNA. (cmf.org.uk)
  • British ambassador Emyr Jones Parry, on the other hand, condemned "the intransigence of those who were not prepared to recognize that other sovereign states - after extensive dialogue and due democratic process - may decide to permit strictly controlled applications of therapeutic cloning. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Last week it became known that a couple from Northern Ireland had been given permission to pursue the process of producing an embryo whose cells could eventually help their three-year-old son recover from a potentially deadly blood disease. (dw.com)
  • surrogate motherhood as an ethically acceptable process, cloning is more or less the same. (scribd.com)
  • Many on the left worry that human cloning, embryonic stem cell research and, soon, designer babies, lay the groundwork for a new form of biocolonialism, in which global life science companies become the ultimate arbiters of the evolutionary process itself. (alternet.org)
  • Both the U.S. House and Senate have legislation in process limiting or banning cloning of human embryonic stem cells. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • donor
  • For example the Nature 2009 report on the birth of non-human primates (3) showed undetectable levels of spindle donor mtDNA, but there are sufficient studies showing carry-over for the effectiveness of this technique to be questioned, along with concerns for the outcomes when this is 'tested' out on humans. (cmf.org.uk)
  • A single type of primitive stem cell transplanted from donor mice gave rise to both blood-forming and bone-forming cells in recipient mice. (fightaging.org)
  • In a worse case scenario, if the donor woman, whose embryo was frozen, had AIDS and you extract the embryonic stem cells and use them to treat another person, that person would also have AIDS. (lifeissues.org)
  • All the processes involved in donating a single human egg cell, including compensation to the donor, costs £8,300. (christiantoday.com)
  • 2000
  • In the August and September 2000 issues, I penned two articles on "Cracking the Code-The Human Genome Project in Perspective. (apologeticspress.org)
  • A briefing paper from the Church of England in 2000 said: "It is important to recognise that embryos are not the sole potential source of stem cells. (christiantoday.com)
  • potential
  • The fact that they cannot develop into healthy offspring is sometimes cited as a reason why their destruction in research is less problematic ethically than the destruction of embryos with better developmental potential. (thehastingscenter.org)
  • Thus, the NIH draft guidelines prohibit federal funding of work on at least two kinds of stem cell lines that have theoretical therapeutic potential beyond that of cell lines derived from "excess" IVF embryos. (thehastingscenter.org)
  • But as tools for discerning the truth about matters of human potential and advancement, they often fall short. (baltimoresun.com)
  • But the scientific possibilities offered by cloning research, the potential for groundbreaking medical, outweighed his other concerns. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Stem cells are blank cells that have the potential to develop into any type of cell in the body. (scribd.com)
  • During organogenesis, molecular and cellular interactions between germ layers, combined with the cells' developmental potential, or competence to respond, prompt the further differentiation of organ-specific cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another Nobel Laureate , James D. Watson , publicized the potential and the perils of cloning in his Atlantic Monthly essay, "Moving Toward the Clonal Man", in 1971. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic cloning utilizes the extracted stem cells to create new cells that have the potential to cure disease or relieve suffering. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • A new breakthrough has been made in the use of stem cells for the potential future treatment of diabetes. (christiantoday.com)
  • experiments
  • The unintended consequences of human knowledge and curiosity are easily recognized in technologies of atom splitting (bombs and waste), agriculture (land devastation), and unethical medical experiments. (ethicsdaily.com)