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  • therapeutic
  • Therapeutic regeneration of molecularly engineered and transplanted autologous stem cells in neurological and cardiovascular diseases due to inability of self-regeneration or repair of endogenous stem cells at sites of inflammation or disease at various stages of progress for regeneration of the damaged tissue depending upon the sites and nature of degeneration. (hoajonline.com)
  • Cancer stem cellsand their susceptibility over their expected to be "downstream or progeny" cancer cells represent a target for therapeutic interventions to prevent latency and consequently relapse or metastasis of the malignant disease. (hoajonline.com)
  • Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and reconstitution: Different species and including primates and humans for studies are being used for development, localization, and therapeutic strategies. (hoajonline.com)
  • Therapeutic window for treatment of cortical ischemia with bone marrow-derived cells in rats," Brain Research , vol. 1306, pp. 149-158, 2010. (hindawi.com)
  • These data will be of use in attempts to recapitulate the HSC self renewal process for therapeutic expansion of stem cells, and our model may correlate with acquisition of self renewal characteristics by cancer stem cells. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Since the 1960s and the therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells of bone marrow origin, there has been increasing interest in the study of undifferentiated progenitors that have ability to proliferate and differentiate in different tissues. (iospress.com)
  • Therapeutic application of natalizumab, an anti-cd49d antibody, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has been associated with increased levels of circulating CD34+ progenitors. (docplayer.net)
  • To help discover the therapeutic uses of these stem cells they are grown in laboratories or by using medication to stimulate new cell growth within the human body. (wikipedia.org)
  • ESCs possess many of the same therapeutic properties as MSCs, including the ability to self-regenerate and differentiate into a number of cell lineages. (wikipedia.org)
  • The exact therapeutic mechanisms of MSCs in the treatment of MS are still very much up to debate among stem cell researchers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nevertheless, these cells are being investigated as the basis for a number of therapeutic applications, including possible treatments for diabetes and Parkinson's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • This includes cells that naturally secrete the relevant therapeutic factors, or which undergo epigenetic changes or genetic engineering that causes the cells to release large quantities of a specific molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • regenerative
  • The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. (hindawi.com)
  • These regenerative endodontic echniques will possibly involve some combination of disnfection or debridement of infected root canal systems ith apical enlargement to permit revascularization and se of adult stem cells, scaffolds, and growth factors. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Regenerative medicine has advanced two major stem cell-based therapies for CNS disorders, namely, transplantation of exogenous stem cells and amplification of endogenous neurogenesis. (cognizantcommunication.com)
  • In 2006 Eaves retired as required by provincial law at that time, becoming Professor Emeritus of Hematology and spending more time on several companies he founded to further the fields of cellular therapy and regenerative medicine - STEMCELL Technologies, STEMSOFT Software Inc. and Malachite Management Inc. These companies continue to grow under his leadership and by 2016, STEMCELL had over 900 employees making Canada's largest biotechnology company. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are being used by researchers in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, to artificially reconstruct human tissue which has been previously damaged. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several different forms of stem cells have been identified and studied in the field of regenerative medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, an ideal treatment must possess both immunomodulating properties to control irregular autoimmune responses to prevent further damage and regenerative properties to stimulate natural repair mechanisms and replace damaged cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • CD34
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cell antigen CD34 also known as CD34 antigen is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CD34 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • The CD34 protein is a member of a family of single-pass transmembrane sialomucin proteins that show expression on early hematopoietic and vascular-associated tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • CD34 is also an important adhesion molecule and is required for T cells to enter lymph nodes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regardless of its mode of action, under all circumstances CD34, and its relatives podocalyxin and endoglycan, facilitates cell migration. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] CD34 is expressed in roughly 20% of murine hematopoietic stem cells, and can be stimulated and reversed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cells are characterized by expressing the cell surface markers CD33, CD34 and HLA-DR. These surface markers are proteins on the surface that are unique to specific cells and certain maturation periods, allowing researchers to differentiate between two different cells as well as what stage the cell is found in its developmental progression. (wikipedia.org)
  • mast
  • Mast cells are the only terminally differentiated hematopoietic cells that express the c-Kit receptor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conversely, the injection of SCF increases mast cell numbers near the site of injection by over 100 times. (wikipedia.org)
  • Activating mutations in this gene are associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors, testicular seminoma, mast cell disease, melanoma, acute myeloid leukemia, while inactivating mutations are associated with the genetic defect piebaldism. (wikipedia.org)
  • It matures into the megakaryocyte, erythrocyte, mast cell or myeloblast based on the presence of specific factors that encourage the cell to choose a lineage to follow. (wikipedia.org)
  • The same paper suggested that FLT3L release was caused by stimulation of mast cells with uric acid, produced from a precursor secreted by the plasmodium parasite. (wikipedia.org)
  • granulocyte colony
  • Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF or GCSF), also known as colony-stimulating factor 3 (CSF 3), is a glycoprotein that stimulates the bone marrow to produce granulocytes and stem cells and release them into the bloodstream. (wikipedia.org)
  • megakaryocyte
  • A megakaryocyte (mega- + karyo- + -cyte, "large-nucleus cell") is a large bone marrow cell with a lobulated nucleus responsible for the production of blood thrombocytes (platelets), which are necessary for normal blood clotting. (wikipedia.org)
  • The megakaryocyte develops through the following lineage: CFU-Me (pluripotential hemopoietic stem cell or hemocytoblast) → megakaryoblast → promegakaryocyte → megakaryocyte. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cell eventually reaches megakaryocyte stage and loses its ability to divide. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • Tumors contain a minority population of cancer stem cells that maintain the tumor. (hoajonline.com)
  • In marked contrast to the cancer stem cells, the tumor cells without "stemness" have either no capacity or a markedly diminished capacity, to form new tumors. (hoajonline.com)
  • On the other hand, elimination or escape of Treg cells also causes the reactivation and induction of tumors and relapse. (hoajonline.com)
  • viable
  • Additional reagents and equipment for counting viable cells by trypan blue exclusion (unit 1.3 ) and flow cytometry (Coligan et al. (currentprotocols.com)
  • Such cells can construct a complete, viable organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The delivered cells (via local or systemic administration) remain viable for a relatively short period (days-weeks) and then die. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • IL2RG, RAG1 and/or RAG2 gene) into the genome of a cell for provision of proteins lacking or deficient in SCID. (patents.com)
  • Bioinformatic strategies were used to group time-ordered gene expression profiles generated from microarrays into signatures of quiescent and dividing stem cells. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • We also identified two genes that increase in both gene and protein expression during activation, and potentially represent new markers for proliferating stem cells. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • These gene expression pattern and level may explain why Muse cells are pluripotent but without tumorigenic activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • BCR/ABL induce cell adhesive and migratory abnormalities because the mutation will lead an abnormal response to chemokine SDF-1 MLL gene encode Histone-lysine N-methyltransferase (HRX), which is a histone methyltransferase. (wikipedia.org)
  • umbilical
  • And umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been introduced as a more attractive HSC source for HSCT, because fetal stem cells in UCB are speculated to be more primitive in comparison to adult stem cells. (docplayer.net)
  • Stem cells can also be taken from umbilical cord blood just after birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • While present in bone marrow, the place where CFU-GEMM is most common is in the umbilical cord between a mother and baby. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been discovered that these cells have a high replating efficiency, meaning that when taken from the umbilical cord and grown in culture, a high percentage of these cells are able to produce colonies. (wikipedia.org)
  • spinal cord i
  • Research has shown that CD34+ cells are relatively more in men than in women in the reproductive age among Spinal Cord Injury victims. (wikipedia.org)
  • This was shown in human Muse cells infused into animal models with fulminant hepatitis, partial hepatectomy, muscle degeneration, skin injury, stroke and spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • MSCs have been used to treat a variety of disorders including cardiovascular diseases, spinal cord injury, bone and cartilage repair, and autoimmune diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • self-renewal
  • Although a single hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) can generate sufficient primitive progeny to repopulate many recipients, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that maintain their potency or regulate their self renewal. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Stem cell self-renewal is thought to occur in the stem cell niche in the bone marrow, and it is reasonable to assume that key signals present in this niche will be important in self-renewal. (wikipedia.org)
  • The classical definition of a stem cell requires that it possesses two properties: Self-renewal: the ability to go through numerous cycles of cell division while maintaining the undifferentiated state. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unipotent cells can produce only one cell type, their own, but have the property of self-renewal, which distinguishes them from non-stem cells (e.g. progenitor cells, which cannot self-renew). (wikipedia.org)
  • fetal liver
  • In mammalian embryology, the first definitive HSCs are detected in the AGM (aorta-gonad-mesonephros), and then massively expanded in the fetal liver prior to colonising the bone marrow before birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute myeloid
  • citation needed] As FA is now known to affect DNA repair, specifically nonhomologous end joining, and given the current knowledge about dynamic cell division in the bone marrow, finding patients are more likely to develop bone marrow failure, myelodysplastic syndromes, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is not surprising. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • CD34+ cells may be isolated from blood samples using immunomagnetic or immunofluorescent methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Donors will undergo an initial apheresis procedure to donate white blood cells. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • After the initial donation, donors will receive injections of filgrastim to release bone marrow cells into the blood. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • After 5 days of filgrastim injections, donors will have apheresis again to donate stem cells that are present in the blood. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Recipients will provide an initial donation of white blood cells to be used for research purposes only. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • See " A Molecular Model of Blood Cell Renewal " , e349. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • CD34+ cells in the blood and marrow of natalizumab-treated patients expressed less of the stem cell marker CD133, were enriched for erythroid progenitors (CFU-E) and expressed lower levels of adhesion molecules. (docplayer.net)
  • Red blood cell substitutes. (pubfacts.com)
  • G-CSF stimulates the production of granulocytes, a type of white blood cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recognition of his research accomplishments and leadership in moving basic science discoveries in stem cell biology into the clinic, he was elected President of the International Society of Cellular Therapy (1995-1997), Treasurer of the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (1995-2002) and President of the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (1999-2000). (wikipedia.org)
  • Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the stem cells that give rise to blood cells through the process of haematopoiesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • It must balance enormous production needs (more than 500 billion blood cells are produced every day) with the need to precisely regulate the number of each blood cell type in the circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • HSCs can replenish all blood cell types (i.e., are multipotent) and self-renew. (wikipedia.org)
  • In general, megakaryocytes are 10 to 15 times larger than a typical red blood cell, averaging 50-100 μm in diameter. (wikipedia.org)
  • These multipotent stem cells live in the marrow sinusoids and are capable of producing all types of blood cells depending on the signals they receive. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternatively, the cell may form platelet ribbons into blood vessels. (wikipedia.org)
  • This crosses the bone marrow barrier to the blood and is consumed in the lung by alveolar macrophages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood, which requires extraction through apheresis, wherein blood is drawn from the donor (similar to a blood donation), and passed through a machine that extracts the stem cells and returns other portions of the blood to the donor. (wikipedia.org)
  • By definition, autologous cells are obtained from one's own body, just as one may bank his or her own blood for elective surgical procedures. (wikipedia.org)
  • This demonstrates that the cells can produce new blood cells over a long term. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone marrow suppression also known as myelotoxicity or myelosuppression, is the decrease in production of cells responsible for providing immunity (leukocytes), carrying oxygen (erythrocytes), and/or those responsible for normal blood clotting (thrombocytes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Instead, the drugs affect new blood cells that are being made by the bone marrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the bone marrow is the manufacturing center of blood cells, the suppression of bone marrow activity causes a deficiency of blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • This condition can rapidly lead to life-threatening infection, as the body cannot produce leukocytes in response to invading bacteria and viruses, as well as leading to anaemia due to a lack of red blood cells and spontaneous severe bleeding due to deficiency of platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cells are normally present in the blood at low levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • The CFU-GEMM cell is capable of differentiating into white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets, all of which are normally found in circulating blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • When erythropoietin (EPO) is present, red blood cell production from the CFU-GEMM will be activated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the CFU-GEMM cell is a very early ancestor of the mature cells of the blood, it is not normally found in the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms caused by bone marrow damage Bruising, spotting: the reason is lack of platelets, it is very common in BAL patients, most of patients die due to the Anemia: Because the decline of hematopoietic function, need blood transfusion therapy Persistent fever, infection prolonged healing: Diffuse hemorrhage: also called Septicemia, which is dangerous and might lead to death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anemia: reduction metrocytes that could produce red blood cells, resulting in a lack of red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Persistent fever, infection prolonged healing: Most of the white blood cells are leukemia cells, no normal function, leading to decreased immunity, susceptible to infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following observation of the symptoms, the patients need to get complete blood counts and a bone marrow examination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among those affected, the majority develops cancer, most often acute myelogenous leukemia, and 90% develop bone marrow failure (the inability to produce blood cells) by age 40. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because macrocytosis usually precedes a low platelet count, patients with typical congenital anomalies associated with FA should be evaluated for an elevated red blood cell mean corpuscular volume. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of the failure of hematologic components to develop-white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets-the body's capabilities to fight infection, deliver oxygen, and form clots are all diminished. (wikipedia.org)
  • While at birth, blood count is usually normal, macrocytosis/megaloblastic anemia, defined as unusually large red blood cells, is the first detected abnormality, often within the first decade of life (median age of onset is 7 years). (wikipedia.org)
  • Within the next 10 years, over 50% of patients presenting haematological abnormalities will have developed pancytopenia, defined as abnormalities in two or more blood cell lineages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Assays
  • BrdU labeling of proliferative cells, biochemical assays of serum, cerebrospinal fluid and brain levels of trophic factors, growth factors, and stress-related proteins are proposed as indices of neurogenesis, while quantitative measurements of spontaneous movements will reveal psychomotor components of immobilization. (cognizantcommunication.com)
  • Stem cells can also be identified by functional assays. (wikipedia.org)
  • Below is a list of genes/protein products that can be used to identify various types of stem cells, or functional assays that do the same. (wikipedia.org)