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  • Robert Lanza
  • Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology , says that was an important step, but not ideal for medical purposes. (wunc.org)
  • Our intent is to use this technology to generate stem cells to treat serious and life-threatening diseases, not to create a child," says Robert Lanza of Advanced Cell Technology (ACT) in an article in "Scientific American" (January 2002). (thenakedscientists.com)
  • genomic
  • In other words, the egg needs to erase all tissue-specific memories from the skin cell and revert it into a genomic blank slate. (eurekalert.org)
  • So the problem of nuclear cloning is genomic reprogramming. (hstalks.com)
  • genetic
  • They would need some genetic marker that would let them tell the cloned cells apart from the native cells of the cow. (futurepundit.com)
  • They repeated the process - this time starting with the genetic material extracted from the skin cells of a much older man. (wunc.org)
  • CloneR™ enables the robust generation of clonal cell lines without single-cell adaptation, thus minimizing the risk of acquiring genetic abnormalities. (stemcell.com)
  • genes
  • With a series of microarray chips, Brambrink measured which genes were active and which were silent in both kinds of cells. (eurekalert.org)
  • He'd like to see a library of cells created with those carefully chosen genes. (wunc.org)
  • A potential use of genetically-customized stem cells would be to create cell lines that have genes linked to the particular disease. (bootstrike.com)
  • These cells express the genes appropriate for mammary gland function, not the genes which are important for embryonic development. (hstalks.com)
  • Only few clones manage to activate these genes, and those which do manage to activate these genes are often not normal. (hstalks.com)
  • neurons
  • They are making new skin cells, blood cells, neurons, and assorted other cell types. (futurepundit.com)
  • Renowned stem cell expert, Swedish researcher Olle Lindvall, in an article at NewScientist.com (November 7, 2003), says he expects to be able to transform stem cells into the dopamine-producing neurons Parkinson's patients so badly need. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Stem cells could potentially be used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease -- but it's a very difficult problem to generate large numbers of dopamine-producing neurons, which are the cells we need," Lindvall says. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Advances
  • Despite tremendous advances in BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies, the majority of patients relapse if therapy is discontinued, in part as a result of dormant cancer stem cell resistance. (labspaces.net)
  • make
  • The Wright brothers took off and this has actually managed to make embryonic stem cells. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It is a lot easier to find indications that one has created a differentiated cell type because differentiated cell types have unique proteins that are well known and used for doing what they do and they make various chemicals that can be tested for. (futurepundit.com)
  • If verified, it would be only the second confirmed time someone's been able to use cloning methods to make human embryonic stem cells, considered the body's master cells. (bioethics.net)
  • The few clones that make it into adulthood are often plagued by bizarre health complications. (eurekalert.org)
  • This could lead to diabetic patients being able to produce their own cells that make insulin to replace their non-functioning cells. (empr.com)
  • create
  • The technique could potentially be used to take skin cells from a patient to create "personalised" stem cells. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Though the way to create life using the cloning method is different (than the natural way), we do believe a being created technically possess a consciousness ("soul") from the first cells division. (dharmaling.org)
  • They injected it into 77 human egg cells, and from all those attempts, managed to create two viable cells that contained DNA from one or the other man. (wunc.org)
  • Lanza also will discuss how stem cells can generate red blood cells, which could potentially create an ever-flowing source of blood for transfusions. (warwickonline.com)
  • hematopoietic
  • Expressed during embryogenesis to help blood cell development, ADAR1 subsequently turns off and is triggered by viral infections where it protects normal hematopoietic stem cells from attack. (labspaces.net)
  • technology
  • A team at Advanced Cell Technology (ACT) in Massachusetts, working with Malcolm Moore of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, cloned skin cells from two cows. (futurepundit.com)
  • For an ethics paper, the student might write a thesis statement such as "the potential for mishandling cloning technology is high. (essaytown.com)
  • Could stem cell technology help reverse the physical decline suffered by Parkinson's patients? (thenakedscientists.com)
  • I am convinced that stem cell technology can become in the future a cure for conditions leading to brain injury -- but I think we have a long way to go. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • process
  • The process has been difficult to do with human cells. (wunc.org)
  • What we show for the first time is that you can actually take skin cells, from a middle-aged 35-year-old male, but also from an elderly, 75-year-old male" and use the DNA from those cells in this cloning process, Lanza says. (wunc.org)
  • In this cloning process, known as nuclear transfer, a donated ovum with all DNA removed had the woman's adult cells inserted and reprogrammed to produce insulin cells. (empr.com)
  • Species
  • In 2001, Lanza was the first to clone an endangered species when he cloned a gaur, which is an animal in the ox family that can be found (rarely) in India, Indochina and Southeast Asia. (warwickonline.com)
  • No matter what you think of the ethical issues surrounding cloning, said Lanza, the science has the potential to right some wrongs done to endangered species at the hands of the very people who could now save them. (warwickonline.com)
  • nuclear
  • Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell , they say they started with nuclear DNA extracted from the skin cells of a middle-age man and injected it into human eggs donated by four women. (wunc.org)