• The last ten years however has seen an explosion of cell based therapeutic approaches stimulating cardiac regeneration and in the process augmenting function in the heart following injury. (hindawi.com)
  • Nevertheless, the search continues for the optimal cell type that can promote "true cardiac regeneration," supplement the lost cardiomyocytes, and at the same time form the angiogenic support structure. (hindawi.com)
  • The great proliferative potential of holoclones ( 9 - 12 ), the capacity of a single holoclone to generate a mature epithelium in vivo ( 13 ) and to differentiate into distinct cellular lineages ( 11 ), and the permanent epithelial regeneration achieved in burn victims by means of grafts of autologous cultured keratinocytes ( 14 - 16 ), provide compelling evidence that keratinocyte "stem-ness" can be preserved in culture. (pnas.org)
  • One example is the transformation of iris cells to lens cells in the process of maturation and transformation of retinal pigment epithelium cells into the neural retina during regeneration in adult newt eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cells also have potential medical applications, especially in organ regeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers at the Eaton-Peabody Laboratory have successfully isolated adult stem cells from the tissue of the mouse utricle. (tinnitusformula.com)
  • Not so long ago, the study of most stem cells, other than those that regenerated the haematopoietic system, was rather obscure and limited to a relatively small number of researchers and laboratories. (springer.com)
  • Two years later, Michael Specter took a look at the Bush Administration's approach to science , and found that, despite Proposition 71 and other small-bore efforts, stem-cell researchers were foundering under federal constraints. (newyorker.com)
  • Researchers from the University of Georgia, Emory University School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh have received a $2.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to test a novel method of producing viable sperm cells from skin cells. (news-medical.net)
  • Researchers have published the results of their work where stem cell therapy has shown promise in a case of spinal cord injury. (news-medical.net)
  • Although stem cells hold promise as direct therapy for human diseases, many researchers are even more enthusiastic about the opportunity to use stem cells to study disease fundamentals. (amnh.org)
  • Learn how clinicians and researchers are involving diabetes patients in the search for a cure by developing new stem cell lines from their DNA. (amnh.org)
  • Answer: Researchers use a microscopic glass pipette to extract the 46 chromosomes of DNA from the nuclei of a skin cell. (amnh.org)
  • Using new gene-editing technology, researchers have rewired mouse stem cells to fight inflammation caused by arthritis and other chronic conditions. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The cells were developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Shriners Hospitals for Children-St. Louis, in collaboration with investigators at Duke University and Cytex Therapeutics Inc., both in Durham, N.C. The researchers initially worked with skin cells taken from the tails of mice and converted those cells into stem cells. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • They also believe embryonic stem cells can provide models to teach researchers about disease progression, and how to stop it. (wired.com)
  • Additionally, researchers believe that studying stem cells can help them understand how primordial cells transform into all the different types of cells in the human body. (wired.com)
  • Because stem cells reproduce to create more stem cells (as well as different types of cells), an established culture can be split up and grown into more cultures, allowing multiple researchers the chance to run any number of experiments. (everything2.com)
  • The researchers induced mouse cells to produce extra quantities of Nanog. (theregister.co.uk)
  • The researchers were able to identify the minimal conditions and factors that would be sufficient for starting the cascade of molecular and cellular processes to instruct pluripotent cells to organize the embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only cells from an earlier stage of the embryo, known as the morula , are totipotent, able to become all tissues in the body and the extraembryonic placenta. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fertilized egg (day 1) undergoes cell division to form a 2-cell embryo, followed by 4-cell, etc. until a ball of cells is formed by the fourth day. (slideshare.net)
  • Also called tissue-specific or somatic stem cells, adult stem cells exist throughout the body from the time an embryo develops. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The result of this 'altered nuclear transfer' would not be an embryo, but a disorganized mass of human cells that would be as useful as embryonic stem cells for medical research and potential therapies. (wired.com)
  • removing one cell from a very early embryo and deriving stem cells from that cell. (wired.com)
  • embryonic stem cells , which are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts , and adult stem cells , which are found in various tissues . (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem cells can now be artificially grown and transformed (differentiated) into specialized cell types with characteristics consistent with cells of various tissues such as muscles or nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • With this ability, they have been used to replace defective cells/tissues in patients who have certain diseases or defects. (slideshare.net)
  • In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. (news-medical.net)
  • Scientific research may show that stem cells can be used to create healthy tissues to replace dysfunctional ones in people with diseases. (amnh.org)
  • Such stem cells, known as SMART cells (Stem cells Modified for Autonomous Regenerative Therapy), develop into cartilage cells that produce a biologic anti-inflammatory drug that, ideally, will replace arthritic cartilage and simultaneously protect joints and other tissues from damage that occurs with chronic inflammation. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • They showed when the Nanog cells were joined with cells previously destined to become nerves they were pushed back in time, regaining the ability to become other tissues. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Although not the only controller of stem cells, the team say the work on Nanog - named after the Celtic mythical forever-young land of Tir Nan Og - is an important step to understanding the mysteries of what stops them becoming differentiated tissues. (theregister.co.uk)
  • The identification of p63 as a keratinocyte stem cell marker will be of practical importance for the clinical application of epithelial cultures in cell therapy as well as for studies on epithelial tumorigenesis. (pnas.org)
  • This phenotype could be explained by either inability of the p63 −/− ectoderm to develop into epithelial lineages ( 20 ), or by lack of stem cell character necessary to sustain epithelial morphogenesis and renewal ( 21 ). (pnas.org)
  • Here we investigate the expression of p63 in epithelial stem and TA cells and show that p63 is a specific marker of human corneal and epidermal stem cells. (pnas.org)
  • Differentiated airway epithelial cells can revert into stable and functional stem cells in vivo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Discovery of tissue specific stem cells capable of forming cardiac cell types has revolutionized cardiac medicine. (hindawi.com)
  • Stem cells are biological cells that can differentiate into other types of cells and can divide to produce more of the same type of stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • 40. Arthur Lander reflects on how current assumptions that stem cells divide asymmetrically and are programmed to produce the right differentiated cell types at the right times may fail to acknowledge a fundamental contribution of stem cell individuality. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Adult stem cells can divide or self-renew indefinitely. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Two traits uniquely characterize embryonic stem cells: the ability to develop into many different cell types in the body, and a limitless ability to divide and replenish. (wired.com)
  • In vivo , keratinocyte stem cells are usually slow-cycling and retain labeled DNA precursors, whereas TA cells divide rapidly and dilute their label quickly ( 4 - 8 ). (pnas.org)
  • They have developed a technique to routinely isolate and propagate these stem cells in an artificial environment. (tinnitusformula.com)
  • Amniotic stem cells are the mixture of stem cells that can be obtained from the amniotic fluid as well as the amniotic membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2009, the first US amniotic stem cell bank was opened in Medford, MA, by Biocell Center, an international company specializing in the cryopreservation and private banking of amniotic fluid stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The presence of embryonic and foetal cells from all germ layers in the amniotic fluid was gradually determined since the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • At around the same time, it was determined that stem cells from the amniotic membrane also have multipotent potential. (wikipedia.org)
  • The majority of stem cells present in the amniotic fluid share many characteristics, which suggests they may have a common origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, foetal stem cells attained from the amniotic fluid are more stable and more plastic than their adult counterparts making it easier for them to be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state. (wikipedia.org)
  • A variety of techniques has been developed for the isolation and culturing of amniotic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • They usually involve the removal of amniotic fluid by amniocentesis and their distinction from other cells may be based on their morphology or other characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem cells can also be taken from umbilical cord blood just after birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is, however, only part of the story - there are four different types of stem cells, and each type determines the use of the cells it produces. (everything2.com)
  • At the time of one if the original writeups in this node it was thought that the only readily accessible source of stem cells was from harvested human foetuses, which understandably raised many moral and ethical issues. (everything2.com)
  • It is widely believed that targeting the tumour-initiating cancer stem cell (CSC) component of malignancy has great therapeutic potential, particularly in therapy-resistant disease. (biomedcentral.com)
  • this is the only form of stem-cell therapy that is widely practiced. (wikipedia.org)
  • ATCC provides a large collection of the most influential and widely cited mouse ES cells. (atcc.org)
  • Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to play an important role in tumor recurrence and drug resistance, and present a major challenge in cancer therapy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Most cancers contain a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs). (biomedcentral.com)
  • The initiation and progression of malignant tumors is driven by distinct subsets of tumor-initiating or cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) which develop therapy/apoptosis resistance and self-renewal capacity. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Natural News) An exciting medical breakthrough published in the science journal Oncotarget has discovered the astonishing ability of concentrated vitamin C to halt the growth of cancer tumor stem cells. (naturalnews.com)
  • What could studying the development of these cells tell scientists? (amnh.org)
  • Answer: Scientists can create the cell type that has the genetic marker for the disease they are studying. (amnh.org)
  • Natural News) Scientists are bringing the concept of "playing God" to whole new level in Latin America, where a U.S. firm plans to test a groundbreaking stem cell method on brain-dead patients that they believe could revive them. (naturalnews.com)
  • Scientists and doctors are interested in stem cells as they help to explain how some functions of the body work, and how they sometimes go wrong. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Scientists are also working on ways to develop stem cells from other cells, using genetic "reprogramming" techniques. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In the past, scientists believed adult stem cells could only differentiate based on their tissue of origin. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Scientists say these abilities make embryonic stem cells excellent candidates for cell therapy. (wired.com)
  • Why do scientists want to use stem cells? (wired.com)
  • Scientists believe they may be able to use stem cells as replacements or patches in people with various diseases. (wired.com)
  • Scientists have also seen success in heart patients who received stem-cell injections. (wired.com)
  • Mistakes in that process can lead to cancer, birth defects and many other ailments, so understanding cell development could give scientists insight into how to correct those errors. (wired.com)
  • How hard is it for scientists make the cells into treatments? (wired.com)
  • Stem cell scientists have pinpointed a molecule that confers the cells with amazing powers of self-renewal and maintains their ability to develop into any other type of cell in the body. (theregister.co.uk)
  • These are promising outcomes that indicate that the cells have the ability to modulate cardiac repair programs leading to replacement of the lost tissue. (hindawi.com)
  • These cells are produced from the fusion of an egg and sperm cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • When a sperm fertilizes an egg, these cells combine to form a single cell called a zygote. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Totipotent stem cells are created by the fusion of a sperm and egg, and are also created by the first few divisions of the egg. (everything2.com)
  • In 2014, the European Medicines Agency recommended approval of limbal stem cells for people with severe limbal stem cell deficiency due to burns in the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within the cornea, nuclear p63 is expressed by the basal cells of the limbal epithelium, but not by TA cells covering the corneal surface. (pnas.org)
  • This second edition volume expands on the previous edition with a comprehensive update on recent developments in the Adipose Stromal/Stem Cells (ASC) field and the use of stroma vascular fraction (SVF) as a potential therapeutic strategy. (springer.com)
  • This article is about the cell type. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inhabiting such a two-dimensional rigid substrate requires a dramatic adaption for the surviving cells because they lack the extracellular matrix that is unique to each cell type, and which may alter cell metabolism and reduce its functionality. (wikipedia.org)
  • In other words, they can develop into each of the more than 200 cell types of the adult body when given sufficient and necessary stimulation for a specific cell type. (slideshare.net)
  • Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body's own immune system attacks and destroys beta cells in the pancreas. (news-medical.net)
  • Discuss that stem cells are special cells in the human body that can develop into virtually any type of body tissue. (amnh.org)
  • Stem cells can turn into any type of cell before they become differentiated. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • These cells can grow into any type of cell. (everything2.com)
  • The proliferative compartment of squamous epithelia also contains a third type of cell, the meroclone ( 9 ), which is considered a "young" TA cell endowed with a greater proliferative capacity than the paraclone ( 11 ). (pnas.org)
  • The reversible transformation of cells of one differentiated cell type to another is called metaplasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • In newts, muscle tissue is regenerated from specialized muscle cells that dedifferentiate and forget the type of cell they had been. (wikipedia.org)
  • Culture conditions may also be adjusted to promote the growth of a particular cell type. (wikipedia.org)