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  • progenitor cells
  • Expanded endothelial progenitor cells mitigate lung injury in septic mice," Stem Cell Research & Therapy , vol. 6, article 230, 2015. (hindawi.com)
  • Dr. Khay-Yong Saw and his team evaluated the quality of the repair knee cartilage after arthroscopic microdrilling (also microfracture) surgery followed by post-operative injections of autologous peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) in combination with hyaluronic acid(HA). (wikipedia.org)
  • TLQP-62 treatment enhances hippocampal neurogenesis both in vitro and in vivo by promoting the proliferation in neuronal progenitor cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002
  • The ISSCR was founded in 2002 to foster the exchange of information on stem cell research and now claims more than 4,100 members worldwide. (isscr.org)
  • Neurons
  • CDI offers several terminally differentiated cell types as catalog products: iCell® Cardiomyocytes, iCell Neurons, iCell Endothelial Cells, and iCell Hepatocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approaches
  • Approaches to accelerate stem cell research are on the way by engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who have developed solutions for the two main problems prohibiting it. (medindia.net)
  • The 'Hinxton Group' met recently for the first time, in Cambridge, and published a consensus statement calling for a 'flexible' regulatory framework, which can simultaneously accommodate rapid scientific advance and at the same time accommodate the diversity of international approaches towards stem cell science. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of note, this may be one of the reasons that commercially available centrifuge systems that concentrate marrow nucleated cells have not shown as much promise in animal research for cartilage repair as have approaches where MSC's are expanded in culture to greater numbers. (wikipedia.org)
  • type of stem
  • Dr. Lanza, who is currently the Chief Scientific Officer of Advanced Cell Technology, said they've developed multiple methods of 'cellular reprogramming,' and a type of stem cell (akin to nanoparticles), that can be injected into the bloodstream and will travel to where damage repair is needed such as in the heart. (coasttocoastam.com)
  • epithelial cells
  • They are very active cells - the intestine replenishes all its cells every few days - and they are intrinsically flexible - already programmed to generate all the various kinds of cells such as mucus cells or epithelial cells present in the highly complex organ. (thenewamerican.com)
  • pluripotency
  • Embryonic stem cells are prized for their pluripotency -- their ability to transform into many different kinds of cells. (go.com)
  • The results appeared to offer a promise that human cells might in future be simply and cheaply reprogrammed back into embryonic cell-like cells - in this case cells dubbed Stimulus-Triggered Acquisition of Pluripotency (STAP) cells - suggesting a simple way to replace damaged cells or grow new organs for sick and injured people. (rte.ie)
  • Rex1 (Zfp-42) is a known marker of pluripotency, and is usually found in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • sperm
  • At one point, we were all just one single cell: a fertilized zygote formed when a sperm and egg fused together. (isscr.org)
  • Totipotent: These cells are produced from the fusion of an egg and sperm cell. (slideshare.net)
  • Much of the research supported by the Foundation cannot be funded by federal grants-in-aid because of the U.S. moratorium on funding research on human eggs activated either artificially or by sperm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biology
  • Also visit our affiliated journals, Cell Stem Cell and Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology , included in Professional Resources. (isscr.org)
  • The research was hailed when it came out in January as a breakthrough that could herald a new era of medical biology. (rte.ie)
  • Diabetes
  • When Kessler was invited to head up the Neurology Department at Northwestern, his focus was on using stem cells to help cure diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fasano
  • We are trying to explore stem cell research aside from embryonic stem cells ," says Dr. Alessio Fasano, lead researcher on the project and director of the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School Medicine. (go.com)
  • Fasano says, and he believes that using adult stem cells, harvested from the intestines of the patients themselves, could be that "better way. (go.com)
  • Adult stem cells, on the other hand, are not as flexible in that way, Fasano admits, but they nonetheless constitute an important alternative for a number of practical reasons. (go.com)
  • ectoderm
  • ES cells are pluripotent and give rise during development to all derivatives of the three primary germ layers: ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm. (slideshare.net)
  • As the ICM matures and begins to form the epiblast, and primitive ectoderm, the cells in the ICM have been found to be a heterogenous population, with varying levels of Rex1 expression. (wikipedia.org)
  • involves
  • It seems that if abortion is permissible, then stem cell research must be as well: it involves the death of a less significant thing (an embryo rather than a fetus) for a greater good (lives saved rather than nine months of physical imposition avoided). (princeton.edu)
  • secretion
  • TLQP-62 treatment increases insulin secretion in cultured insulinoma cells by increasing intracellular calcium mobilization. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone
  • Because of their multi-potent capabilities, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) lineages have been used successfully in animal models to regenerate articular cartilage and in human models to regenerate bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite this low number of MSC's, isolated bone marrow nucleated cells implanted into degenerated human peripheral joints have shown some promise for joint repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the number of MSC's that can be isolated from bone marrow is fairly limited, most research in cartilage regeneration has focused on the use of culture expanded cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • viable
  • They are working towards eliciting a response from stem cells to different drugs or genes, and also creating a large healthy supply of viable stem cells to study from only a few available cells. (medindia.net)
  • Bush
  • The cell line was one of the 22 in existence during the Bush administration or was created from embryos that had been discarded after in vitro fertilization procedures. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act was the name of two similar bills that both passed through the United States House of Representatives and Senate, but were both vetoed by President George W. Bush and were not enacted into law. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act of 2005 (H.R. 810) was the first bill ever vetoed by United States President George W. Bush, more than five years after his inauguration. (wikipedia.org)
  • extraembryonic
  • Only cells from an earlier stage of the embryo, known as the morula, are totipotent, able to become all tissues in the body and the extraembryonic placenta. (slideshare.net)
  • found that these teratocarcinoma stem cells, when in the presence of retinoic acid (RA), differentiated into nontumorigenic cells resembling extraembryonic endoderm of early mouse embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • A team led by Jonathan Dordick, the Howard P. Isermann Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and visiting doctoral student Tiago Fernandez and Professor Joaquim M.S. Cabral from the Instituto Superior T chinco-Lisbon in Portugal developed a platform that will enhance the speed of drug discovery by revealing how different molecules help or hinder stem cell function. (medindia.net)
  • A Singapore company has used stem cells to help victims of serious burns and other wounds grow fresh skin, its chief medical officer said in a report published Friday. (rxpgnews.com)
  • therapy
  • Renegade thinker & scientist Robert Lanza discussed the nature of the Universe, and his theory of 'biocentrism,' as well as the latest developments in stem cell therapy. (coasttocoastam.com)
  • Bush's
  • Polls show the majority of Americans as well as both houses of Congress support this research and President Bush's veto will not endure. (ljworld.com)
  • centers
  • As a main national hematology-oncology center, it is among the most prominent stem cell transplantation centers in the world, with more than 300 successful transplantations performed per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • and funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (wikipedia.org)
  • America
  • Your Candidates-Your Health is an initiative launched by Research!America and partner organizations to inform voters of their presidential and congressional candidates' views on health and research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your Candidates-Your Health Research!America Your Candidates-Your Health website. (wikipedia.org)
  • lines
  • ES cell cultures have been grown for more than two years in the laboratory as immortal cell lines, but embryonic germ cellcultures can only survive about 70 to 80 cell divisions. (slideshare.net)
  • This makes them less suitable for establishing cell lines for research. (slideshare.net)
  • The bill the president vetoed would have expanded the number of embryonic cell lines eligible for federal funding. (ljworld.com)
  • The group has requested that all authors of embryonic stem cell papers submit a statement of authenticity of any new cell-lines and that the source of stem cells be clearly specified. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human cells are considered to be a more predictive model and a replacement for other cellular models that serve as proxies, including animal cells, immortalized cell lines, and cadaveric cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2013, CIRM awarded CDI a US$16,000,000 grant to derive 3 iPS cell lines from each of 3,000 donors that represent a multitude of disease states. (wikipedia.org)
  • CDI's role in this project is to generate iPS cell lines and cardiomyocytes from 250 donors selected from the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN) GWAS study. (wikipedia.org)