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  • 100,000
  • However Sooam Biotech continued developing proprietary techniques based on a licence from ViaGen's subsidiary Start Licensing (which owns the original Dolly patent) and continued creating cloned dogs for owners whose dogs had died, charging $100,000 a time. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015 the Chinese company BoyaLife announced that in partnership with the Korean company Sooam Biotech, they were planning to build a factory in Tianjin, China to produce 100,000 cloned cattle per year, starting in 2016 to supply China's growing market for quality beef. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers
  • It should be noted that no babies were born as a result of this research, and the researchers had no intention of producing a live cloned human being. (www.nhs.uk)
  • During their experiments, researchers identified two reasons for this inability to sufficiently grow the cells and developed techniques to overcome these limiting factors. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This study will no doubt be very exciting for researchers working with stem cells, but we're still a long way from the findings of this study being translated into new treatments for conditions such as Parkinson's disease or heart disease . (www.nhs.uk)
  • Researchers then optimised methods to prompt the egg cell to start and continue to divide using electricity and chemical compounds, including caffeine. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Researchers have tried to test the integrity of these surviving stem cells by transplanting them into fertilized blastocysts and then observing the overall health of the resulting animal. (eurekalert.org)
  • NBC News ] Researchers say they have made powerful stem cells from both young and old adults using cloning techniques, and also found clues about why it is so difficult to do this with human beings. (bioethics.net)
  • CopyCat
  • Operation CopyCat was a branch of the Missyplicity Project that concentrated on cloning cats, after the discovery that dog genes are harder to copy than cat genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • In January 2016 the scientist at the Central Institute for Research on Buffaloes in Hisar, India announced that they had cloned a buffalo offspring "Cirb Gaurav" using cells of the ventral side of the tail of superior buffalo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dolly
  • The resulting egg was implanted in the womb of a third sheep, and the result was Dolly, the first clone of a mammal. (wunc.org)
  • patient
  • The technique could potentially be used to take skin cells from a patient to create "personalised" stem cells. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Physicians could also extract DNA from the person who is going to receive the cellular transplant - creating a patient-specific treatment - though that would end up being far more expensive than drawing from a library of ready-made cells. (wunc.org)
  • Lanza
  • Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology , says that was an important step, but not ideal for medical purposes. (wunc.org)
  • What we show for the first time is that you can actually take skin cells, from a middle-aged 35-year-old male, but also from an elderly, 75-year-old male" and use the DNA from those cells in this cloning process, Lanza says. (wunc.org)
  • Each of those two cells is able to divide indefinitely, "so from a small vial of those cells we could grow up as many cells as we would ever want," Lanza says. (wunc.org)
  • donors
  • There are ethical concerns surrounding nuclear transfer, particularly regarding recruitment and compensation for egg donors needed for stem cell research. (empr.com)
  • viable
  • They injected it into 77 human egg cells, and from all those attempts, managed to create two viable cells that contained DNA from one or the other man. (wunc.org)
  • create
  • Embryologist Tong Dizhou unsuccessfully inserted the DNA from a male Asian carp into the egg of a female Asian carp to create the first fish clone in 1963. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1973 Dizhou inserted Asian carp DNA into a European crucian carp to create the first interspecies of this clone. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Media coverage of this study was as varied as people's feelings are about stem cell research. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Patients with diabetes may one day benefit from stem cell therapy, as research published in the journal Nature describes the first insulin-producing cells containing the DNA of a 32-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes. (empr.com)
  • They agreed and Missy's conserved cells were flown to the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation outside of Seoul. (wikipedia.org)
  • After 10 years of research and effort, the quest to clone Missy had finally succeeded. (wikipedia.org)
  • A purebred Hereford calf clone named Chloe was born in 2001 at Kansas State University's purebred research unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Boran cattle bull was cloned at the International Livestock Research Institute in Nairobi. (wikipedia.org)
  • process
  • The process has been difficult to do with human cells. (wunc.org)
  • They repeated the process - this time starting with the genetic material extracted from the skin cells of a much older man. (wunc.org)
  • But this entire process is almost never perfect, and nearly all cells in a cloned blastocyst retain some memory of their original source. (eurekalert.org)
  • In flowering plants, cells of the gametophyte can undergo this process. (wikipedia.org)
  • skin
  • These are then fused with human cells - in this case skin cells - and the fused cell begins behaving in a similar way to an embryo by producing human stem cells. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell , they say they started with nuclear DNA extracted from the skin cells of a middle-age man and injected it into human eggs donated by four women. (wunc.org)
  • In other words, the egg needs to erase all tissue-specific memories from the skin cell and revert it into a genomic blank slate. (eurekalert.org)
  • A Holstein heifer named Daisy was cloned by Dr. Xiangzhong (Jerry) Yang using ear skin cells from a high-merit cow named Aspen at the University of Connecticut in 1999, followed by three additional clones, Amy, Betty, and Cathy in 1999. (wikipedia.org)
  • journal
  • It was funded by OHSU, the Leducq Foundation and the US National Institutes of Health, and was published in the peer-reviewed journal, Cell. (www.nhs.uk)
  • heart
  • And with a bit of coaxing, these cells could, theoretically, be prodded to turn into any sort of human cell - nerve, heart, liver and pancreas, for example. (wunc.org)
  • begins
  • Diploidy might be restored by the doubling of the chromosomes without cell division before meiosis begins or after meiosis is completed. (wikipedia.org)
  • stage
  • The egg develops into a blastocyst, an early stage embryo consisting of no more than 100 or so cells. (eurekalert.org)
  • The chromosomes may not separate at one of the two anaphases (called restitutional meiosis), or the nuclei produced may fuse or one of the polar bodies may fuse with the egg cell at some stage during its maturation. (wikipedia.org)
  • team
  • In 2007, Lou Hawthorne, former CEO of GSC and current CEO of BioArts International, was introduced to Dr. Hwang and his team by Dr. Shin of BioArts, and asked if they would clone Missy. (wikipedia.org)
  • birth
  • Dolly's birth set off a huge outpouring of ethical concern - along with hope that the same techniques, applied to human cells, could be used to treat myriad diseases. (wunc.org)
  • Most clones, in fact, die in utero or at birth. (eurekalert.org)
  • series
  • With a series of microarray chips, Brambrink measured which genes were active and which were silent in both kinds of cells. (eurekalert.org)
  • mice
  • The experimental elimination of senescent cells from transgenic progeroid mice and non-progeroid, naturally-aged mice led to greater resistance against aging-associated diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • Cellular senescence is the phenomenon by which normal diploid cells cease to divide. (wikipedia.org)
  • As such, cellular senescence represents a change in "cell state" rather than a cell becoming "aged" as the name confusingly suggests. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consistent with this, telomerase-immortalised cells continued to age (according to the epigenetic clock) without having been treated with any senescence inducers or DNA-damaging agents, re-affirming the independence of the process of epigenetic ageing from telomeres, cellular senescence, and the DNA damage response pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wong-Staal used a type of cellular analysis known as radioimmunoprecipitation in order to detect the presence of KS lesions in cells with varying amounts of the tat protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • In 1990 a team of researchers led by Wong-Staal studied the effects that the Tat protein within the viral strain HIV-1 would have on the growth of cells found within Kaposi's Sarcoma lesions commonly found in AIDS patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • He found a T cell derived factor that induced the synthesis of 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in hematopoietic cells and termed it interleukin-3. (wikipedia.org)