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  • outbreak
  • A thought-provoking find from the SARS pandemic was that in the absence of super-spreading events, most infected individuals caused very few (if any) secondary contacts, but a low number of super-spreaders fueled the global outbreak. (novapublishers.com)
  • Here we use an outbreak of chikungunya as a case study where detailed epidemiological data were collected and combine it with statistical approaches to characterize the multiple factors that influence the risk of infectious disease transmission and may depend on characteristics of the individual (e.g., age, sex), of his or her close relatives (e.g., household members), or of the wider neighborhood. (pnas.org)
  • Whether an individual becomes infected in an infectious disease outbreak depends on many interconnected risk factors, which may relate to characteristics of the individual (e.g., age, sex), his or her close relatives (e.g., household members), or the wider community. (pnas.org)
  • Here, we used an outbreak of chikungunya in a rural community in Bangladesh as a case study to obtain a more comprehensive characterization of risk factors in disease spread. (pnas.org)
  • After all, individual self-initiated behaviour can change the fate of an outbreak, and its interaction with disease dynamics requires proper understanding if we are to fully comprehend what happens when a disease spreads through human populations ( Ferguson 2007 ). (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • MONSEY, New York - More than 300 people have been diagnosed with the mumps in suburban New York as America's largest outbreak of the disease in years spreads. (nbcnews.com)
  • Investigators say the outbreak started in August 2009 at a Jewish summer camp in Sullivan County with an 11-year-old boy who brought the disease from England. (nbcnews.com)
  • An encephalitis outbreak was investigated in Faridpur District, Bangladesh, in April-May 2004 to determine the cause of the outbreak and risk factors for disease. (cdc.gov)
  • For a complete and current list of FACTS about please refer to Other Sections you should refer to in the manual in relation to diseases & illness includes Infection Control/Outbreak Control, Immunization, & Safe Environment. (docplayer.net)
  • The 330-bed National Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCID) is designed to manage an outbreak on the scale of Sars in 2003, said its executive director Leo Yee Sin at a media briefing yesterday. (straitstimes.com)
  • Ebola
  • There, in 2013, a 2-year-old boy encountered a colony of bats in a hollow tree and contracted Ebola, a disease that would go on to claim his life and the lives of more than 11,000 other people. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Any time you're dealing with a patient with a potentially infectious disease-be it adenovirus, influenza or heaven forbid, Ebola-you want to be very cautious in making sure you apply universal precautions against the spread of infection," Dr. Quinn advises. (aoa.org)
  • Most of the global-disease-related headlines of the past decade have been devoted to the Ebola virus, SAARS, and MERS, which have been transmitted from human to human, thanks to a different effect of modern technology: rapid spread of isolated incidences through urbanization and global air transportation. (xconomy.com)
  • Tuberculosis, bubonic plague and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, meanwhile, are linked to unplanned urbanization while yellow fever, Kyasanur Forest disease and Ebola are tied to deforestation and its knock-on effects. (biology-online.org)
  • We might think that Ebola as it currently stands does not warrant such limitations: it is infectious by sharing bodily fluids and is likely to be comparatively easily contained in a wealthy country with strong health infrastructures. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Ebola is a terrifying disease, and I expect many readers are willing to give up this freedom and these economic gains to ensure greater protection against Ebola, especially if it mutated. (ox.ac.uk)
  • A key feature of the 330-bed National Centre for Infectious Diseases is its high-level isolation unit for treating high-risk pathogens, including haemorrhagic fevers caused by the Ebola and Marbug viruses. (straitstimes.com)
  • pediatric
  • H. Dele Davies, MD , is an internationally recognized expert in pediatric infectious diseases and a leader in community health. (radiomd.com)
  • He is also a current member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society Finance committee. (radiomd.com)
  • He completed training in pediatrics and pediatric infectious diseases at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. (radiomd.com)
  • Dr. Mary Anne Jackson completed pediatric residency at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and infectious diseases fellowship training at the University of Texas-Southwestern before joining the staff at Children's Mercy, Kansas City where she has been the Division Director of Infectious Diseases since 1996. (radiomd.com)
  • She has served in roles at the American Board of Pediatrics as medical editor of the ID subboard, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Academy of Pediatrics as a member of the Committee on Infectious Diseases and Associate Editor of the Red Book 2015 and 2018. (radiomd.com)
  • She has been a research mentor to medical students, residents and fellows in training and junior faculty and over her 30-year career, her educational and research contributions to the field of pediatric infectious diseases have resulted in numerous teaching awards, over 300 national research presentations, and peer-reviewed publications. (radiomd.com)
  • That's why we sat down to speak with Yvonne Maldonado, MD , chief of pediatric infectious disease at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford and a professor at the Stanford School of Medicine, to learn more about this year's new quadrivalent vaccine as well as to get tips on how to minimize the chances of catching the flu. (businesswire.com)
  • Dr. Cash began his international career over 50 years ago at the Cholera Research Laboratory (CRL) in Dhaka, Bangladesh (now the International Centre for Diarrheal Diseases Research, Bangladesh-ICDDR.B). He and his colleagues developed and conducted the first clinical trials of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in adult and pediatric cholera patients and in patients with other infectious causes of diarrhea. (ijme.in)
  • Cholera
  • In 2006 Cash was presented with the Prince Mahidol Award by Thailand for his work on ORT, a practical treatment for cholera and other diarrheal diseases that has saved the lives of millions of children and in 2011 with the James F. and Sarah T. Fries Foundation Prize for Improving Health, also for his leadership in the development and dissemination of Oral Rehydration Therapy. (ijme.in)
  • germs
  • Kids also should practice hand-washing and other health basics to avoid spreading germs. (businesswire.com)
  • Skin and Scalp Infections These infections are caused by bacteria (impetigo), viruses (herpes), parasites (head lice, scabies) and fungi (ringworm) Spread through close physical contact (i.e. skin to skin) Skin may also come into contact with infectious material such as fluid inside a chickenpox blister Some of these germs cause infestations and not infections or illness (i.e. head lice) 5. (docplayer.net)
  • vector-borne diseases
  • Vector-borne diseases in particular-which are primarily spread by insect hosts and which cause more than one million deaths annually-are highly sensitive to alterations in the weather. (xconomy.com)
  • It's also worth looking at Southern Asia, where malaria is already one of the most important vector-borne diseases. (xconomy.com)
  • The risk for reintroduction of vector-borne diseases in Europe as a consequence of global warming was highlighted, although long-distance tourism, travel, and trade could also play major roles in the transcontinental transport of microorganisms ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Microbiology
  • Ph.D., a program officer in the Office of Genomics and Advanced Technologies in NIAID's Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (DMID), and Cristina Cassetti, Ph.D., chief of the Virology Branch in DMID, are also available for comment. (nih.gov)
  • respiratory
  • On his Monday show, talk-radio host Rush Limbaugh explored the possibility of a link between the flood of illegal aliens and the spread of a severe and rare respiratory virus known as Enterovirus D68, or EV-D68. (adinakutnicki.com)
  • contagious
  • BARRY: Well, we do what's called surveillance and control of contagious diseases. (npr.org)
  • Rashes A rash can be a symptom of a number of illnesses Spread through physical contact, the air, and through contact with faecal matter Generally an illness is contagious before a rash appears and therefore makes controlling these kinds of illnesses difficult 4. (docplayer.net)
  • infection control
  • Consequently, epidemiologists and social scientists are modeling networks to evaluate novel disease surveillance and infection control strategies. (phys.org)
  • Colin Brown, PHE Consultant Medical Microbiologist, commented: "PHE continues to provide ongoing expert support and advice on infection control measures to limit the spread of Candida auris in healthcare settings. (id-hub.com)
  • Capacity for person-to-person transmission increases the potential for wider spread of this highly lethal pathogen and highlights the need for infection control strategies for resource-poor settings. (cdc.gov)
  • By following good personal hygiene and infection control practices, staff in a day nursery can play a key role in the prevention and control of infectious diseases in their facility. (docplayer.net)
  • Proper infection control procedures are mandatory to combat the spread of resistant organisms within ICUs. (springer.com)
  • behavior
  • The simulation of contagion scenarios contributes to the understanding of the epidemic behavior of diseases. (unt.edu)
  • humans
  • Indeed, vectors-living organisms, such as bloodsucking insects that can transmit infectious diseases between humans or from animals to humans-respond to a variety of climate variables, including temperature, precipitation, humidity, sea level, wind, and daylight duration. (xconomy.com)
  • The virus will mutate so that it spread between humans. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • parasite
  • Meanwhile, water flow changes and changes in water chemistry associated with dams like the Aswan in Egypt and irrigation schemes on the Senegal River are being linked with an increase in snails carrying the parasite that causes schistosomiasis, also known as bilharzia, a disease that leads to chronic ill health. (biology-online.org)
  • insects
  • Discarded plastic bags, old tins and car tyres offer, when filled with rainwater, perfect new breeding opportunities for disease-carrying insects. (biology-online.org)
  • Geographic Spread
  • The Geographic Spread of Infectious Diseases: Models and Applications Edition by Lisa Sattenspiel and Publisher Princeton University Press. (vitalsource.com)
  • The model simulations suggested that moderate delays in geographic spread may be possible with stringent restrictions and a low reproduction number, but results will be sensitive to the reproduction number and timing of restrictions. (cdc.gov)
  • germ
  • A once-rare drug-resistant germ now appears to cause more than half of all skin infections treated in U.S. emergency rooms, say researchers who documented the superbug's startling spread in the general population. (nbcnews.com)
  • pathogen
  • A significant challenge that is shared by most (if not all) infectious diseases is our insufficient understanding of the dynamic host-pathogen interaction. (novapublishers.com)
  • Our findings highlight the role that integrating statistical approaches with in-depth information on the at-risk population can have on understanding pathogen spread. (pnas.org)
  • research
  • The research, published in Nature today, was supported in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (nih.gov)
  • Infections
  • In 2002, 20 people on an international flight were infected by a single SARS patient, which showed how air travel could serve as a conduit for the rapid spread of both emerging infections and pandemics of known diseases. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • However, in developing countries, this serovar, together with serovar Typhimurium, frequently causes invasive infections and substantial illness and death among young children with underlying diseases and among adults with HIV infection ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • study
  • A study led by Michigan State University's April Zeoli found that homicide spreads through a community like infectious disease. (phys.org)
  • Homicide moves through a city in a process similar to infectious disease, according to a new study that may give police a new tool in tracking and ultimately preventing murders. (phys.org)
  • The synthetic environments facilitate the study of the spread of infectious diseases in diverse scenarios. (unt.edu)
  • This study may be unique in demonstrating that social position affects one's risk of acquiring disease. (phys.org)
  • This completely matches what our experience at Vanderbilt Children's Hospital has been," said Dr. Buddy Creech, an infectious-disease specialist whose hospital was not included in the study. (nbcnews.com)
  • In efforts to eliminate infectious diseases and improve hygiene habits, the Global Hygiene Council, together with Dettol, the expert in hygiene, conducted two main studies this year - the Cross- contamination Study and the Back to School Study. (theasianparent.com)
  • Professor
  • We tend to treat disease systems in isolation from social systems, and we don't often think about how they connect to each other, or influence each other," said Chris Bauch, co-author and a professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics at Waterloo. (sciencecodex.com)
  • deadly
  • This groundbreaking legislative package aims to reduce the harms associated with substance abuse disorders, including rates of addiction, deadly overdose, the spread of infectious disease, crime, costs to the general public, and incarceration rates. (drugpolicy.org)
  • But what if it mutates to a less deadly but more easily transmissible form, spreading as easily as perhaps flu? (ox.ac.uk)
  • gaps
  • We highlight recent advances as well as gaps in our understanding of the interplay between infectious disease dynamics and human behaviour, and suggest what kind of data taking efforts would be helpful in filling these gaps. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The studies aimed to understand hygiene behaviour and identify knowledge gaps around the spread of bacteria. (theasianparent.com)
  • detect
  • As the temperatures plummet and flu season reaches its peak, the AOA reminds members of the role optometry plays in fighting infectious diseases-and the resources available to detect and treat them. (aoa.org)
  • Chagas
  • There are drugs to treat Chagas disease, but they are toxic, there is no approved vaccine, and diagnostics are crude to non-existent for different forms of this disease. (xconomy.com)
  • climate
  • But climate change is also spurring an altered pattern of devastating infectious diseases on just about every continent today. (xconomy.com)
  • Now we should add the ways that climate change is changing the infectious disease landscape to our awareness and begin to ask how to address this significant global challenge. (xconomy.com)
  • Climate change may aggravate the threats of infectious diseases in three ways, by increasing the temperatures under which many diseases and their carriers flourish, by further stressing and altering habitats, and by causing migrations, experts suggest in UNEP's Global Environment Outlook Year Book 2004/2005. (biology-online.org)
  • threat
  • Although the environmental costs of global warming may still seem distant to some Americans, there is a growing threat that many may find harder to ignore: infectious disease. (chicagotribune.com)
  • 1) Despite all the remarkable technological breakthroughs that we have made over the past few decades, the threat from infectious diseases has significantly accelerated. (coursera.org)