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  • temperature
  • Researchers and clinicians often rely on improvised methods to handle and transport frozen biospecimens and therapies such as placing samples on dry ice, which is considerably warmer at temperature of -78C, handling heavy LN 2 dry shippers that must be transported on a cart or dolly, or handling unabsorbed LN 2 in open containers that present a safety issue. (technologynetworks.com)
  • Specimens may lose fur or feathers when exposed to warm environments because the high temperature causes residual fats in skins to release. (wikipedia.org)
  • transport
  • Specimen, along with requisition, should be placed in appropriate biohazard transport bag. (micropathlabs.com)
  • Companies announce the launch of CryoPod™ Carrier, a jointly developed liquid nitrogen (LN 2 )-based system for the safe, reliable and protected handling and transport of cryogenic biospecimens. (technologynetworks.com)
  • materials
  • Subject: Small cytologic specimen handling recommendations Can anyone recommend materials and methods or products for processing small specimens of loosely aggregated cells? (histosearch.com)
  • Available for tensile, flexural, and compression testing, Instron® TestMaster Automated Testing Solutions can improved the safety and productivity of testing for a wide range of materials and specimen sizes. (instron.us)
  • Pests, such as dermestid beetles, clothes moths, and rodents, can cause damage to taxidermy specimens by eating materials and leaving larvae husks behind. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • Even if stained, these can be very difficult for the histotechs to see the specimens, which are small and blend in with the paraffin, and therefore difficult to determine how far to section into the block. (histosearch.com)
  • Signs of a pest infestation in taxidermy include small piles of dust (known as frass) underneath a specimen and shedding skin from growing larvae. (wikipedia.org)
  • collections
  • Taxidermy has a robust history, and specimens can be found in a number of public and private institutions, as well as personal collections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Natural history museums, zoos, science & nature centers, historic houses, art museums, and children's museums are examples of institutions that may have taxidermy specimens in their collections. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History houses Martha, the last passenger pigeon and a some collections still have Great Auk specimens, a bird species that went extinct in 1844. (wikipedia.org)
  • perform
  • The Instron Automated Testing Systems for Metals are configured to perform unattended tensile testing of metallic specimens of varying lengths and thicknesses. (instron.us)
  • possible
  • Whenever possible, specimens should be collected prior to antibiotic therapy. (sclhealth.org)
  • Specimens should be transported to the lab as soon as possible to minimize loss of viability of the pathogen and overgrowth of contaminating organisms. (sclhealth.org)
  • useful
  • Also, the specimen disaggregates during processing so the cells are widely separated (or lost) and less useful than they could be otherwise. (histosearch.com)
  • manner
  • Pack clotted and anticoagulated specimens in such a manner as to avoid hemolysis. (sclhealth.org)
  • Because of the many different ways that fungal examination of nails can be ordered, 4path's policy is to triage nail fungal specimens in the following manner, based on what is generally thought to be best medical practice. (4path.com)
  • impact
  • Gravity can also negatively impact taxidermy specimens by pulling unsupported components, such as tails and horns, away from the main structure, thus causing tears and breaks. (wikipedia.org)