Loading...
  • India
  • The researchers spent two years documenting the distribution of 70 bird species across the Himalayas in India and found that temperature and habitat predominantly determine the elevations where the birds live. (phys.org)
  • Scientists
  • Earlier research by other scientists on tropical birds had shown that competition limited the ranges of most species, a conclusion often presumed to be true for temperate zones as well. (phys.org)
  • If scientists and conservationists know the factors that determine why species live where they do, they can more effectively target their efforts and resources to ensure those species' survival, said Wilcove, who was Elsen's doctoral adviser at Princeton. (phys.org)
  • Now scientists have mapped which critters normally live in or on us and where. (wilmington.net)
  • PhysOrg.com) -- Thanks to genetic data gleaned from the bones found in a several museum collections, an international team of researchers led by scientists from Yale believes it may be possible to resurrect a tortoise species hunted to extinction by whalers visiting the Galapagos Islands during the early 19th century, before Charles Darwin made his famous visit. (phys.org)
  • Scientists across the globe participated in the Human Microbiome Project to map out the trillions of microbes living in and on the human body, finding that microbes outnumber human cells 10 to 1. (theweek.com)
  • the ant was, however, mistakenly identified as the type species of Rhytidoponera by some scientists. (wikipedia.org)
  • IUCN
  • The IUCN Red List was founded in 1963 and is the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of biological species. (care2.com)
  • The IUCN Red List is critical as an indicator of the health of biodiversity, in identifying conservation needs and informing necessary changes in policy and legislation to drive conservation forward, says Jean-Christophe Vi , Deputy Director of IUCN s Global Species Programme. (care2.com)
  • The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (wikipedia.org)
  • bird species
  • The researchers found, however, that competition sets the boundaries for a mere 12 percent of Himalayan bird species, while temperature and habitat dictate where 48 and 40 percent of species, respectively, feather their nests. (phys.org)
  • The researchers found that competition set the boundaries for a mere 12 percent of Himalayan bird species, while temperature and habitat dictate where 48 and 40 percent of species live, respectively. (phys.org)
  • Predators include the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and a number of bird species. (wikipedia.org)
  • animal species
  • Plants are a crucial resource for human wellbeing and are a critical part for wildlife habitats, yet they often play second fiddle in the media to animal species that are in danger. (care2.com)
  • There are also many animal species that depend on their environment for transportation, a type of mobility called passive locomotion, e.g., sailing (some jellyfish), kiting (spiders) and rolling (some beetles and spiders). (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • Daoudi S, Badihi G & Buchanan-Smith HM (2017) Is Mixed-Species Living Cognitively Enriching? (stir.ac.uk)
  • Hastings, P.A. & Conway, K.W. (2017): Gobiesox lanceolatus, a new species of clingfish (Teleostei: Gobiesocidae) from Los Frailes submarine canyon, Gulf of California, Mexico. (wikipedia.org)
  • captivity
  • There are a number of benefits to exhibiting such species in mixed communities in captivity, for instance the increased social complexity provides both environmental and social enrichment and appropriate cognitive challenges, ultimately enhancing their welfare in restricted captive enclosures. (stir.ac.uk)
  • The team believes that the similar genetic hybrids living in captivity on the Galapagos were descendents of tortoises that were taken by whalers as future meals but then thrown overboard to make room for the more lucrative cargo of whale blubber. (phys.org)
  • rapidly
  • They are also increasingly being used to make predictions about where species will live in the future under a rapidly changing climate. (ucsb.edu)
  • The world is full of marvelous species that are rapidly moving towards becoming things of myth and legend if conservation efforts are not more success fully implemented if we do not act now, future generations may not know what a Chinese Water Fir or a Bizarre-nosed Chameleon look like. (care2.com)
  • ranges
  • This working group proposes to develop such a state-of-the-art compilation of environmental factors likely to have a strong impact on species ranges. (ucsb.edu)
  • Across the world, we've already seen species shifting their ranges in response to climate change. (phys.org)
  • commonly
  • Due to the computer revolution in biology, it has now become commonplace to build correlational models that link the range of a species to commonly measured (and easily available) climate variables like mean annual temperature. (ucsb.edu)
  • human
  • Background: The completion of the sequencing of human, mouse and rat genomes and knowledge of cross-species gene homologies enables studies of differential gene expression in animal models. (sciweavers.org)
  • We have used various bioinformatics approaches to examine microarray expression profiles from liver neoplasms that arise in albumin-SV40 transgenic rats to elucidate genes, chromosome aberrations and pathways that might be associated with human liver cancer. (sciweavers.org)
  • This study examined patterns of space use in two mixed-species groups of Sapajus and Saimiri housed at the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre, RZSS Edinburgh Zoo. (stir.ac.uk)
  • Many human residents never know coyotes are living nearby. (jsonline.com)
  • It also supports the idea that modern human ancestors could have interbred with another human species, the Neanderthals, as posited by genome analyses. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • First author Paul Elsen, who led the study as a Princeton graduate student in ecology and evolutionary biology, explained that the findings indicate that species living in temperate mountain habitats-particularly in the northern latitudes-could face even greater repercussions from climate change than previously thought as temperatures rise and habitats change or are disrupted. (phys.org)
  • likely
  • The researchers selected birds for their ubiquity, variety and ease of observation, but the results could likely apply to many other warm-blooded mountain species, he said. (phys.org)
  • Genes co-expressed across multiple species are most likely to have conserved functions. (sciweavers.org)
  • among
  • For decades, among the most enduring questions for ecologists have been: "Why do species live where they do? (phys.org)
  • Over a few generations, a selective breeding program among these tortoises should be able to revive the C. elephantopus species, said Adalgisa Caccone, senior research scientist in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology at Yale and senior author of the piece published this week in the online journal PLoS ONE . (phys.org)
  • largest
  • The giant manta ray is the largest living ray, which can grow to more than seven meters across. (care2.com)
  • With a maximum length exceeding 20 centimeters, this species is the largest land slug. (wikipedia.org)
  • available
  • Monitoring how these species interact and utilize their available space is important for effective care and management. (stir.ac.uk)
  • share
  • The goal is to share this compilation with the research community at large, and to use the information to explore what factors are actually the most important and most predictive in determining where a species lives. (ucsb.edu)
  • We predicted that if Sapajus and Saimiri were attracted to the presence of the other species then they would share the same space when in mixed enclosures. (stir.ac.uk)
  • plants
  • Anybody who has ever opened a guidebook to birds or plants is familiar with the range maps showing where a particular species lives. (ucsb.edu)
  • List
  • Named after the town of Tarzanville in Madagascar where it was discovered in 2009, Tarzan's chameleon is one of the most colorful of the 61,900 species on this year's updated Red List. (care2.com)
  • host
  • Instead of constantly feeding on a live host, females attack salps, using their mouths and claws to eat the animal and hollow out its gelatinous shell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most species of lice are host specific, with the sucking lice being more host specific than chewing lice. (wikipedia.org)
  • wild
  • The Rhynchophthirina, the elephant lice, consists of only 3 species that parasitize elephants and wild pigs in Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • reduce
  • This species is thermophilic, anaerobic, and can reduce thiosulfate. (theinfolist.com)
  • Although this is not the end of the Javan rhino, it does reduce the species to a single, minuscule, decreasing population on Java. (care2.com)