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  • world's
  • Species 2000 is a federation of database organizations across the world that compiles the Catalogue of Life, a comprehensive checklist of the world's species, in partnership with the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Over 40% of the world's species are estimated to be at risk of extinction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strange and endangered species - A schoolboy reaches out to touch a humpheaded Maori wrasse as it swims in the world's largest Great Barrier Reef exhibit at the Sydney Aquarium in June 2003. (cnn.com)
  • taxa
  • The list below includes all of the taxa recognized as species in recent works on Mentha . (wikipedia.org)
  • Two or more taxa once considered conspecific (of the same species) may later be subdivided into infraspecific taxa (taxa within a species, such as bacterial strains or plant varieties ), but this is not a species complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • An example of a superspecies is Species aggregate Used for a species complex, especially in plant taxa where polypoidy and apomixis are common. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based upon chloroplast DNA analysis and differences in morphologies and mating systems, however, Soreng [ 47 , 48 , 49 ] has classified the two taxa as distinct species. (fed.us)
  • taxonomy
  • The intricate pattern of morphologic, geographic, and ecologic variation within the species has frustrated all efforts to organize an intraspecific taxonomy on a circumboreal or even a strictly North American basis [ 26 ]. (fed.us)
  • Prosopis
  • Eleven countries in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world participated in the systematic collection of seeds of some 281 provenances of 43 species, mainly of the genera Acacia and Prosopis , and in the establishment of comparative trials. (fao.org)
  • 2001
  • Altered Species, early knowned as Rodentz, is a 2001 horror film, about a scientist who has found a way to regenerate damaged tissue in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • The creation of Species 2000 was initiated by Frank Bisby and colleagues at the University of Reading in the UK in 1997 and the Catalogue of Life was first published in 2001. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • While administrators and member organizations of Species 2000 are located across the world, the secretariat is located at the University of Reading. (wikipedia.org)
  • goal of species
  • One goal of species theory is to be able to analyse complicated structures by describing them in terms of transformations and combinations of simpler structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The goal of species reintroduction is to establish a healthy, genetically diverse, self-sustaining population to an area where it has been extirpated, or to augment an existing population. (wikipedia.org)
  • binomial
  • In open nomenclature it indicates that available material or evidence suggests that the proposed species is related to, has an affinity to, but is not identical to, the species with the binomial name that follows. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diego
  • Strange and endangered species - A baby Buergers tree kangaroo appears out of her mother's pouch at the San Diego Zoo in January 2003 in San Diego, California. (cnn.com)
  • meanings
  • Several terms are used synonymously for a species complex, but some of them may also have slightly different, or more narrow meanings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike their more general use elsewhere, the List uses the terms "endangered species" and "threatened species" with particular meanings: "Endangered" (EN) species lie between "Vulnerable" (VU) and "Critically Endangered" (CR) species, while "Threatened" species are those species determined to be Vulnerable, Endangered or Critically Endangered. (wikipedia.org)
  • distinguish
  • Introduction of a species outside its native range is all that is required to be qualified as an "introduced species" such that one can distinguish between introduced species that may not occur except in cultivation, under domestication or captivity whereas others become established outside their native range and reproduce without human assistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • 20th century
  • In the first part of the 20th century, plant ecologists often used the species-area curve to estimate the minimum size of a quadrat necessary to adequately characterize a community. (wikipedia.org)
  • habitat
  • Listed as Near Threatened because its Extent of Occurrence is probably not much greater than 20,000 km2, and its habitat is in decline, thus making the species close to qualifying for Vulnerable. (iucnredlist.org)
  • The species-area relationship or species-area curve describes the relationship between the area of a habitat , or of part of a habitat, and the number of species found within that area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Frank W. Preston , an early investigator of the theory of the species-area relationship, divided it into two types: samples (a census of a contiguous habitat that grows in census area, also called "mainland" species-area relationships), and isolates (a census of discontiguous habitats, such as islands, also called "island" species-area relationships). (wikipedia.org)
  • Regardless of census design and habitat type, species-area relationships are often fit with a simple function. (wikipedia.org)
  • is a constant which depends on the unit used for area measurement, and equals the number of species that would exist if the habitat area was confined to one square unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • biology
  • In biology, a species is the basic unit of biological classification and a taxonomic rank, as well as a unit of biodiversity, but it has proven difficult to find a satisfactory definition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modern biology understands a species as "separately evolving metapopulation lineage " but acknowledges that the criteria to delimit species may depend on the group studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Western juniper may hybridize with Utah juniper ( J. osteosperma ) where the two species occur together in northwestern Nevada east of California's Warner Mountains. (fed.us)
  • Governments
  • The effects of introduced species on natural environments have gained much scrutiny from scientists, governments, farmers and others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Governments should strengthen protected areas as a way to save their countries' species. (iucn.org)
  • reproductive
  • They are identified by the rigorous study of differences between individual species, making use of minute morphological details, tests of reproductive isolation , or DNA -based methods such as molecular phylogenetics or DNA barcoding . (wikipedia.org)
  • example
  • An example is the species of dink frog, Diasporus ventrimaculatus, originally described as Diasporus ventrimaculatus sp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many nations have laws that protect conservation-reliant species: for example, forbidding hunting, restricting land development or creating preserves. (wikipedia.org)
  • The underlying concept of addressing IAS and their impacts is that the most effective and cost efficient way is to prevent the introduction in the first place through the management of 'pathways', for example through regulation of trade or movement of certain species. (iucn.org)
  • organism
  • Species reintroduction is the deliberate release of a species into the wild, from captivity or other areas where the organism survives. (wikipedia.org)
  • The species-area relationship is usually constructed for a single type of organism, such as all vascular plants or all species of a specific trophic level within a particular site. (wikipedia.org)
  • slopes
  • It has been presumed that "island"-like species-area relationships have higher slopes (in log-log space ) than "mainland" relationships, but a 2006 metaanalysis of almost 700 species-area relationships found the former had lower slopes than the latter. (wikipedia.org)
  • defines
  • In the nomenclature codes of zoology and bacteriology, no taxonomic ranks are defined at the level between subgenera and species, while the botanical code defines four ranks below genera (section, subsections, series and subseries). (wikipedia.org)
  • systematic
  • In combinatorial mathematics, the theory of combinatorial species is an abstract, systematic method for analysing discrete structures in terms of generating functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Larger areas tend to contain larger numbers of species, and empirically, the relative numbers seem to follow systematic mathematical relationships. (wikipedia.org)
  • intentionally
  • Some species have been introduced intentionally to combat pests. (wikipedia.org)
  • Formal definition from the United States Environmental Protection Agency: A species that has been intentionally or inadvertently brought into a region or area. (wikipedia.org)
  • belongs
  • In a suitable context it also may suggest the possibility that the shell belongs to a species that has not yet been described. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Other ways of defining species include their karyotype, DNA sequence, morphology, behaviour or ecological niche. (wikipedia.org)
  • Herbaceous species typical in these areas include common lambsquarters ( Chenopodium album ) , narrowleaf globemallow ( Sphaeralcea angustifolia ), white sweetclover ( Melilotus alba ), and silverleaf nightshade ( Solanum elaeagnifolium ) [ 99 ]. (fed.us)
  • ecosystem
  • Some have a negative effect on a local ecosystem, while other introduced species may have no negative effect or only minor impact. (wikipedia.org)
  • extinction
  • Bonn, Germany, May 22, 2008 (IUCN/Wiley-Blackwell) - The first study to determine the global status of 21 species of oceanic pelagic sharks and rays reveals that 11 of them are threatened with extinction, says IUCN on International Biodiversity Day. (iucn.org)
  • The 2008 IUCN Red List Birds Update makes grim reading with 1,226 species of birds threatened with extinction. (iucn.org)
  • widely
  • At the time, however, it was still widely believed that there was no organic connection between species, no matter how similar they appeared. (wikipedia.org)
  • Origin
  • Charles Darwin's 1859 book The Origin of Species explained how species could arise by natural selection. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cryptogenic species ("cryptogenic" being derived from Greek "κρυπτός", meaning hidden, and "γένεσις", meaning origin) is a species whose origins are unknown. (wikipedia.org)
  • This term, introduced by Ernst Mayr in 1942, was initially used with the same meaning as cryptic species, but later authors emphasized the common phylogenetic origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • biodiversity
  • As a practical matter, species concepts may be used to define species that are then used to measure biodiversity, though whether this is a good measure is disputed, as other measures are possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • Internationally, 199 countries have signed an accord to create Biodiversity Action Plans that will protect endangered and other threatened species. (wikipedia.org)
  • another
  • If as Linnaeus thought, species were fixed, there would be no problem, but evolutionary processes cause species to change continually, and to grade into one another. (wikipedia.org)
  • one species never springs from the seed of another nor vice versa. (wikipedia.org)
  • aegis would mean that this shell somewhat resembles the shell of Lucapina aegis, but is thought more likely to be another species, either closely related to, or closely resembling Lucapina aegis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The difference between one species and another is that they build a different set of structures out of the same base set. (wikipedia.org)
  • Species-area relationships are often graphed for islands (or habitats that are otherwise isolated from one another, such as woodlots in an agricultural landscape) of different sizes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast, species-area relationships for contiguous habitats will always rise as areas increases, provided that the sample plots are nested within one another. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common
  • Common names are also given for species that have them. (wikipedia.org)
  • A species complex is in most cases a monophyletic group with a common ancestor, although there are exceptions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Commonwealth of Massachusetts [ 72 ] lists common snowberry as an endangered species. (fed.us)
  • important
  • The Seven Species have played an important role in the food of the Israelites (later: Jews) in the Land of Israel and the religious traditions of Judaism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The seven species are all important ingredients in Israeli cuisine today Cooper 1993, pp. 4-9. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the Arctic grayling, T. thymallus is one of the economically important Thymallus species, being raised commercially and fished for sport. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is an important species in many early- to late-seral and subclimax plant communities in Idaho [ 53 ]. (fed.us)
  • Scientists
  • Scientists and conservationists need a species definition which allows them to work, regardless of the theoretical difficulties. (wikipedia.org)
  • There have been calls from scientists to consider a species "invasive" only in terms of their spread and reproduction rather than the harm they may cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • conservation
  • Though labelled a list, the IUCN Red List is a system of assessing the global conservation status of species that includes "Data Deficient" (DD) species - species for which more data and assessment is required before their status may be determined - as well species comprehensively assessed by the IUCN's species assessment process. (wikipedia.org)