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  • produce a somatic
  • In this area of study, SSPs are used as markers to determine the embryogenic potential and competency of the embryogenic system to produce a somatic embryo biochemically similar to its zygotic counterpart (Flinn et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • The somatic fusion process occurs in four steps: The removal of the cell wall of one cell of each type of plant using cellulase enzyme to produce a somatic cell called a protoplast The cells are then fused using electric shock (electrofusion) or chemical treatment to join the cells and fuse together the nuclei. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • Developments on the viability of the two main competing molecular models on the mechanism of somatic hypermutation (SHM) since 1987 have now reached a resolution, particular molecular data published since 2000. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Somatic anxiety is the physical symptoms of anxiety, such as butterflies in the stomach. (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic experiencing is a form of alternative therapy aimed at relieving the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental and physical trauma-related health problems by focusing on the client's perceived body sensations (or somatic experiences). (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic dysfunction is diagnosed via physical examination by an osteopathic physician, which is a physician with the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree (D.O.). The osteopathic physician looks for signs and symptoms related to the somatic dysfunction commonly represented by the mnemonic device "TART" (tissue texture change, asymmetry, restriction, and tenderness) or "STAR" (sensitivity, tissue texture change, asymmetry, restriction). (wikipedia.org)
  • Of the signs and symptoms associated with somatic dysfunction, tenderness is the only purely subjective finding, while the others are objective findings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Functional somatic syndrome is a term used to refer to physical symptoms that are poorly explained. (wikipedia.org)
  • Functional somatic syndrome is characterized by ambiguous, non-specific symptoms that appear in otherwise-healthy populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some have proposed to group symptoms into clusters or into one general functional somatic disorder given the finding of correlations between symptoms and underlying etiologies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic symptom disorders are not the result of conscious malingering (fabricating or exaggerating symptoms for secondary motives) or factitious disorders (deliberately producing, feigning, or exaggerating symptoms). (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic symptom disorders are a group of disorders, all of which fit the definition of physical symptoms similar to those observed in physical disease or injury for which there is no identifiable physical cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic symptoms may be generalized in four major medical categories: neurological, cardiac, pain, and gastrointestinal somatic symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • [ 1 ] category of Somatic Symptom Disorders and Other Related Disorders represents a group of disorders characterized by thoughts, feelings, or behaviors related to somatic symptoms. (medscape.com)
  • This category represents psychiatric conditions because the somatic symptoms are excessive for any medical disorder that may be present. (medscape.com)
  • Clinicians need to estimate the relative contribution of psychological factors to somatic symptoms. (medscape.com)
  • Somatic symptoms can dramatically improve with successful treatment of the anxiety or mood disorder. (medscape.com)
  • cognitive
  • The Drive Theory (Zajonc 1965) says that if an athlete is both skilled and driven (by somatic and cognitive anxiety) then the athlete will perform well. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Inverted-U Hypothesis (Yerkes and Dodson, 1908), also known as the Yerkes-Dodson law (Yerkes 1908) hypothesizes that as somatic and cognitive anxiety (the arousal) increase, performance will increase until a certain point. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Multi-dimensional Theory of Anxiety (Martens, 1990) is based on the distinction between somatic and cognitive anxiety. (wikipedia.org)
  • The theory predicts that there is a negative, linear relationship between somatic and cognitive anxiety, that there will be an Inverted-U relationship between somatic anxiety and performance, and that somatic anxiety should decline once performance begins although cognitive anxiety may remain high, if confidence is low. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Catastrophe Theory (Hardy, 1987) suggests that stress, combined with both somatic and cognitive anxiety, influences performance, that somatic anxiety will affect each athlete differently, and that performance will be effected uniquely, which will make it difficult to predict an outcome using general rules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Edward Slingerland applies Damasio's somatic-marker hypothesis to the cognitive linguistics of Gilles Fauconnier and Mark Turner and George Lakoff and Mark Johnson, especially Fauconnier and Turner's theory of conceptual blending and Lakoff and Johnson's embodied mind theory of metaphor. (wikipedia.org)
  • His goal in importing somatic theory into cognitive linguistics is to show that the primary purpose of achieving human scale is not to help us apprehend a situation, but rather to help us to know how to feel about it. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetics
  • somatic crossing-over In genetics, crossing-over during mitosis of somatic cells , such that parent cells heterozygous for a given allele , instead of giving rise to two identical heterozygous daughter cells, give rise to daughter cells one of which is homozygous for one of these alleles, the other being homozygous for the other allele. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Studies of somatic crossing-over, somatic assortment, and cell fusion make up somatic-cell genetics, a modern asexual genetic technique that allows a wide range of in vitro manipulation of higher cells, including human cells, as well as those of other organisms. (encyclopedia.com)
  • mechanisms
  • Physically, the somatic epitype corresponds to changes in DNA methylation, oxidative damage (replacement of GTP with oxo-8-dGTP), or changes in DNA-chromatin structure that are not reversed by normal cellular or nuclear repair mechanisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • The term somatic is often used in biology to refer to the cells of the body in contrast to the germ line cells which usually give rise to the gametes (ovum or sperm). (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic recombination, as opposed to the genetic recombination that occurs in meiosis, is an alteration of the DNA of a somatic cell that is inherited by its daughter cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The somatic hybrid cell then has its cell wall induced to form using hormones The cells are then grown into calluses which then are further grown to plantlets and finally to a full plant, known as a somatic hybrid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic cells of different types can be fused to obtain hybrid cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chromosome mapping through somatic cell hybridization is essentially based on fusion of human and mouse somatic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • As multicellularity evolved many times, sterile somatic cells did too. (wikipedia.org)
  • Those species with a separation between sterile somatic cells and a germ line are called Weismannists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like all cells, somatic cells contain DNA arranged in chromosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, in humans, somatic cells contain 46 chromosomes organized into 23 pairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • An example of this is the modern cultivated species of wheat, Triticum aestivum L., a hexaploid species whose somatic cells contain six copies of every chromatid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic cells have also been collected in the practice of cryoconservation of animal genetic resources as a means of conserving animal genetic material, including to clone livestock. (wikipedia.org)
  • Development of biotechnology has allowed for the genetic manipulation of somatic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Now, the same group of researchers have found that the cause of somatic cell conversion into pluripotent stem cells is the ribosome, a protein synthesizing cellular organelle. (news-medical.net)
  • cell
  • Somatic recombination occurs physiologically in the assembly of the B cell receptor and T-cell receptor genes (V(D)J recombination), as well as in the class switching of immunoglobulins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mistargeted somatic hypermutation is a likely mechanism in the development of B-cell lymphomas and many other cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • During proliferation, the B cell receptor locus undergoes an extremely high rate of somatic mutation that is at least 105-106 fold greater than the normal rate of mutation across the genome. (wikipedia.org)
  • A generalized scheme for somatic cell hybridization may be described as follows. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Somatic fusion, also called protoplast fusion, is a type of genetic modification in plants by which two distinct species of plants are fused together to form a new hybrid plant with the characteristics of both, a somatic hybrid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alvarado C, Beitel LK, Sircar K, Aprikian A, Trifiro M, Gottlieb B (2005) Somatic mosaicism and cancer: a micro-genetic examination into the role of the androgen receptor gene in prostate cancer. (springer.com)
  • Wide-ranging in coverage, the authors provide an updated view of somatic genomes and genetic theories while also offering interpretations of somatic genome variation. (recordedbooks.com)
  • evolutionary
  • Early mathematical modeling of cancer, by Armitage and Doll , set the stage for the future development of the somatic evolutionary theory of cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Experiencing
  • Somatic Experiencing attempts to promote awareness and release physical tension that remains in the aftermath of trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another element of Somatic Experiencing therapy is "pendulation", the movement between regulation and dysregulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic experiencing is used for both shock trauma and developmental trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to the horse's inherent therapeutic and somatic-based qualities, somatic equine therapy also incorporates principles and techniques from Somatic Experiencing (SE), a psychobiological model of trauma resolution that is also effective for relieving chronic stress. (sierratucson.com)
  • nervous system
  • It is also used in the term somatic nervous system which is the portion of the vertebrate nervous system which regulates voluntary movements of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • The somatic nervous system ( SNS or voluntary nervous system ) is the part of the peripheral nervous system associated with the voluntary control of body movements via skeletal muscles . (wikipedia.org)
  • The somatic nervous system controls all voluntary muscular systems within the body, and the process of voluntary reflex arcs . (wikipedia.org)
  • anxiety
  • Somatic anxiety is often pushed to the side and is not being treated as seriously as other forms of anxiety. (wikipedia.org)
  • The reason there is no cure for these somatic anxiety pains is that the treatment plans are too risky and might be harmful to the child. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although commonly overlooked, scientist are starting to study somatic anxiety more. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies are actually starting to show that some medically overlooked cases that could not relate physical pain to any type of organ disfunction typically could have been somatic anxiety. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapeutic
  • Somatic psychology is a form of alternative medicine that focuses on somatic experience, and the embodied self, including therapeutic and holistic approaches to body. (wikipedia.org)
  • skeletal
  • In osteopathic medicine and osteopathy, somatic dysfunction is defined as the impaired or altered function of related components of the somatic (bodywork) system including: the skeletal, arthrodial, and myofascial structures, and their related vascular, lymphatic, and neural elements. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • The guidelines for management were revised recently in the March 2017 issue of Chest and the condition was renamed somatic cough . (healthcentral.com)
  • Plant
  • Through somatic fusion, the crop potato plant Solanum tuberosum - the yield of which is severely reduced by a viral disease transmitted on by the aphid vector - is fused with the wild, non-tuber-bearing potato Solanum brevidens, which is resistant to the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • essentially
  • This argument is essentially an attempt to connect of conceptual blending theorists with those of neuroscientists who argue for the importance of somatic states and emotional reactions in human value-creation and decision-making. (wikipedia.org)
  • sensations
  • An example given by Charlotte Hanlon and Abebaw Fekeddu was that someone of sub African descent might describe their somatic pain as burning or crawling sensations all over the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Primary somatic symptom disorders may be associated with a heightened awareness of normal bodily sensations. (medscape.com)
  • primary
  • The primary relationship addressed in somatic psychology is the person's relation to and empathy with their own felt body. (wikipedia.org)
  • client's
  • Working with the client's implicit knowing of these early experiences, somatic psychology includes the non-verbal qualities that mark most human communication, especially in the first years of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • Somatic is also defined as relating to the wall of the body cavity, particularly as distinguished from the head, limbs or viscera. (wikipedia.org)
  • Somatic psychology is a framework that seeks to bridge the mind-body dichotomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pierre Janet can perhaps be considered the first somatic psychologist due to his extensive psychotherapeutic studies and writings with significant reference to the body (some of which pre-date Freud). (wikipedia.org)
  • As a field of study, somatic psychology has been defined as: 'the study of the mind/body interface, the relationship between our physical matter and our energy, the interaction of our body structures with our thoughts and actions. (wikipedia.org)
  • trauma
  • In 2005 Robinson began writing a series of books exploring somatic theory in different communicative contexts: modernist/formalist theories of estrangement (Robinson 2008), translation as ideological pressure (Robinson 2011), first-year writing (Robinson 2012), and the refugee experience, (de)colonization, and the intergenerational transmission of trauma (Robinson 2013). (wikipedia.org)