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  • cassava
  • Neurological disorders are known to occur in populations consuming food containing cyanogenic glucosides (e.g. cassava), particularly in combination with poor nutrition (when cyanide detoxification is impaired). (ecetoc.org)
  • potent
  • Cyanide is a potent inhibitor of respiration, acting on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase and hence blocking electron transport. (ttnet.net)
  • Cyanide is considered, in a broad sense, to be the most potent ligand for many transition metals . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Cyanide is a potent cellular asphyxiant inhibiting multiple enzyme systems but most importantly it inhibits cytochrome oxidase, an enzyme in the electron transport chain responsible for aerobic production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). (calpoison.org)
  • Cyanide is also a potent neurotoxin with direct effects on the central nervous system (CNS) particularly in areas of the brain with the highest oxygen needs and metabolic activity. (calpoison.org)
  • cyanogenic
  • In plants, cyanides are usually bound to sugar molecules in the form of cyanogenic glycosides and serve the plant as defense against herbivores . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Some plants, particularly pitted fruits from the Prunus species (apricots, cherry, peaches), contain the cyanogenic glycoside, amygdalin, which is converted to cyanide and other substances following ingestion. (calpoison.org)
  • physiological
  • Most of these cyanides under physiological and environmental conditions will be present as HCN, which is the common toxic species (ACH dissociates into acetone and HCN). (ecetoc.org)
  • humans
  • Worker health studies with cyanides are inadequate for determining a no-adverse effect level in humans. (ecetoc.org)
  • The acutely toxic cyanide concentration that can be tolerated by humans may be of the same order of magnitude. (ecetoc.org)
  • substances
  • These guidelines provide technical information on how to identify and manage the public health hazards and risks associated with the use of the following vertebrate toxic agents: all substances containing sodium fluoroacetate, potassium and sodium cyanide, yellow phosphorous and 3-chloro-p-toluidine hydrochloride. (health.govt.nz)
  • tablets
  • For example, companies processing ore may dissolve potassium cyanide tablets in liquid to create a diluted solution that helps separate the precious metal from other components of the ore. (reference.com)
  • gold
  • Sodium cyanide is used industrially across the globe, most frequently in the mining of gold. (theconversation.com)
  • The various cyanides have numerous commercial uses, including extracting gold and silver from ore, use as insecticides, exterminating pests such as rats , production of acrylic fibers and synthetic rubbers, and even for collecting fish for the aquarium trade. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Gold is extracted from its ores by mechanical means and separated from other metals by chemical processes, notably the cyanide process cyanide process or cyanidation, method for extracting gold from its ore. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • laboratory
  • From 2007-2011, there 1,148 exposures to cyanide reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers with the majority of cases being categorized as unintentional involving chemical laboratory personnel. (calpoison.org)
  • chemical
  • Airborne HCN undergoes slow photolysis, but the major part is absorbed into the oceans, where cyanide is removed by chemical and/or biological degradation. (ecetoc.org)
  • Workers exposed to potassium cyanide on the job are typically required to wear chemical-resistant clothing and protective breathing apparatuses to avoid health risks. (reference.com)
  • Al(CN)3 is the chemical formula for aluminum cyanide, according to EndMemo. (reference.com)
  • For plants , cyanide offers an effective chemical defense against herbivores. (newworldencyclopedia.org)