• Hydrogen cyanide has a distinctive bitter almond odor, but some individuals cannot detect it and consequently, it may not provide adequate warning of hazardous concentrations. (cdc.gov)
  • Hydrogen cyanide is very volatile, producing potentially lethal concentrations at room temperature. (cdc.gov)
  • Harmful exposure to potassium cyanide may occur after consuming contaminated food or beverages, inhaling droplets in the air or accidentally absorbing the chemical through the skin or eyes. (reference.com)
  • Exposure to hydrogen cyanide can cause skin and eye irritation. (cdc.gov)
  • For example, companies processing ore may dissolve potassium cyanide tablets in liquid to create a diluted solution that helps separate the precious metal from other components of the ore. (reference.com)
  • inadequate warning because rapid olfactory fatigue can occur and 20-40% of the general population cannot smell hydrogen cyanide. (cdc.gov)
  • Workers exposed to potassium cyanide on the job are typically required to wear chemical-resistant clothing and protective breathing apparatuses to avoid health risks. (reference.com)
  • Al(CN)3 is the chemical formula for aluminum cyanide, according to EndMemo. (reference.com)
  • Children exposed to the same levels of hydrogen cyanide as adults may receive larger doses because they have greater lung surface area:body weight ratios and increased minute volumes:weight ratios. (cdc.gov)
  • Potassium cyanide is most often found in pellets or capsules used for gold and silver ore extraction, fumigation and electroplating in industrial settings. (reference.com)
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