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  • clinicians
  • Independent addiction experts and clinicians repeatedly assert that some controlled substances, including cannabis and 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), are wrongly placed in the drug conventions' most restrictive schedules. (hhrjournal.org)
  • Research
  • While the effects of criminalization under drug policy limit the right to health in multiple ways, we draw on research and documented examples to highlight the impact of drug control and criminalization on access to medicines. (hhrjournal.org)
  • Committee
  • 3 To this end, WHO convenes an Expert Committee on Drug Dependence (WHO Expert Committee) to study controlled substances and make recommendations on the level of risk of harm and the therapeutic utility of a substance, which should subsequently be reflected in the substances' scheduling under the drug conventions. (hhrjournal.org)
  • 4 On several occasions, however, the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) rejected the recommendation of the WHO Expert Committee, particularly when it comes to recognizing the potential therapeutic benefits of certain cannabinoids that are controlled (as is discussed below). (hhrjournal.org)
  • Justice
  • Despite the mandate that these obligations be enforced equally, the dominant paradigm enshrined in the drug conventions is an enforcement-heavy criminal justice response to controlled substances that prohibits and penalizes their misuse. (hhrjournal.org)
  • This paper argues that the drug conventions' prioritization of criminal justice measures-including efforts to prevent non-medical use of controlled substances-undermines access to medicines and infringes upon the right to health and the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress. (hhrjournal.org)
  • Despite the mandate that these two obligations be enforced equally, the dominant paradigm-in both the text of the drug conventions and their implementation-is an enforcement-heavy criminal justice response to controlled substances that centers on preventing what is deemed in law to be their misuse. (hhrjournal.org)
  • substances
  • Drug conventions serve as the cornerstone for domestic drug laws and impose a dual obligation upon states to prevent the misuse of controlled substances while ensuring their adequate availability for medical and scientific purposes. (hhrjournal.org)
  • The international drug control conventions (hereinafter "the drug conventions") impose varying levels of control on a range of substances based, in theory, on their perceived risk of misuse and medicinal value. (hhrjournal.org)
  • Substances are listed in four separate "schedules," with each schedule determining the requisite level of control for the substance listed within it. (hhrjournal.org)
  • Indeed, the World Health Organization's (WHO) Model List of Essential Medicines includes 12 medicines that contain internationally controlled substances, such as morphine, methadone, buprenorphine, diazepam, and phenobarbital. (hhrjournal.org)
  • Many controlled substances embody the duality in the drug conventions-that is, they have both licit (medical) uses and uses defined as illegal in some jurisdictions. (hhrjournal.org)
  • Balancing the medical merits of substances with their likelihood for non-medical use is, in theory, a matter of scientific judgment, and the drug conventions provide that the scheduling of controlled medicines should be based on WHO recommendations. (hhrjournal.org)
  • drug
  • The prioritization and protection of human rights-specifically the right to health and the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress-are critical to rebalancing drug policy. (hhrjournal.org)
  • 2 Essential controlled medicines are used across the spectrum of health care, from childbirth, surgical anesthesia, and pain relief in palliative care (such as for people with end-stage AIDS or terminal cancer), to mental health treatment, drug dependence treatment, and neurological care. (hhrjournal.org)
  • poverty
  • A social worker is a professionally trained person employed in the administration of charity, social service, welfare, and poverty agencies, advocacy, or religious outreach programs (Hudson, 2000). (ivoryresearch.com)
  • Imprisonment has become the response of first resort to far too many of the social problems that burden people who are ensconced in poverty. (colorlines.com)
  • Welfare reform, cynical manipulation and vulnerability ', The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice , 15 , 171 -85. (cambridge.org)
  • So much of the adverse impacts of poverty and other social determinants of health are mediated to children through the care and stimulation they receive in their early years. (caac.org.au)
  • Policing
  • Mathieu Deflem's Policing World Society is a highly scholarly and groundbreaking book on a subject largely neglected by social science - the globalization of police work. (oup.com)
  • Organization of academic panel on Policing for Criminal Justice Department Campus Ministries: Mary Brennan Soup Kitchen, Midnight Homeless Run Division or College Committees, Special Programs AAUP Membership Chairperson Dean's Advisory Committee on the Library English Department Search Committee Faculty Moderator: Not for Sale Club Global Learning Chaperone Sicily May 2014 Graduate Academic Policies & Programs (GAPP) Committee Faculty Recognition Award May 2013 Faculty Scholarship Recognition March 2016, 2017, 2018. (livecareer.com)
  • penal
  • She has pioneered community-based learning methods in legal education, having introduced the first community-based learning module partnering with nongovernmental organisations on penal policy, and supervised the first Employment-Based PhD student researching penal policy to work with a nongovernmental organisation. (tcd.ie)
  • Professor Rogan is committed to using research to improve penal policy and the policymaking process. (tcd.ie)
  • She is a member of the Board of the Irish Association for the Social Integration of Offenders, the Victims' Rights Alliance, and is a former Chairperson of the Irish Penal Reform Trust. (tcd.ie)
  • When prisons disappear human beings in order to convey the illusion of solving social problems, penal infrastructures must be created to accommodate a rapidly swelling population of caged people. (colorlines.com)
  • reforms
  • In addition to making Australia a more equal and fairer society through redistributive policies, including taxation reforms, there is an urgent need to provide key evidence based early childhood programs for disadvantaged children. (caac.org.au)
  • engage
  • Social work " is the work produced by social workers who engage in intervention and assistance to provide change in the feelings, well-being and behaviour of an individual, or a specific social group in a community (Hudson, 2000). (ivoryresearch.com)
  • and social mobilization to engage society, especially the poor, and all allies and partners in the campaign to Stop TB. (stoptb.org)
  • The school's undergraduate criminology and criminal justice programs help prepare students to think critically about, and engage thoughtfully with, the legal system and issues of crime, social policies and systems of punishment and social control. (merrimack.edu)
  • vulnerable
  • Brown , K. ( 2014 ) ' Questioning the vulnerability zeitgeist: care and control practices with "vulnerable" young people ', Social Policy and Society , 13 , 3 , 371 -87. (cambridge.org)
  • Advocates for vulnerable adults are beginning to see the need to enlist many other professionals, including animal care and control professionals and veterinarians, in the effort to identify and respond to people in need. (vactf.org)
  • However, few agencies provided special training or had policies in place to address these issues, and there had been little attempt to coordinate activities of humane societies, animal control agencies, and social services involved in protecting vulnerable adults. (vactf.org)
  • disability
  • Students will understand the leading causes of illness, death, and disability and approaches to prevention and control of those conditions in resource-constrained settings. (buffalo.edu)
  • international
  • Introduces students to the interconnections among culture, social expectations, and international business. (buffalo.edu)
  • Advocacy is intended to secure the support of key constituencies in relevant local, national and international policy discussions and is expected to prompt greater accountability from governmental and international actors. (stoptb.org)
  • The International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board sets high-quality international standards for auditing, assurance, and quality control that strengthen public confidence in the global profession. (ifac.org)
  • With no systematic evaluation of data from developing countries, no forewarning of the impending spread of HIV/AIDS or of the demise of the Soviet Union, and no coherent approach to control, TB was invisible to international donors and taken to be a fact of life in the most-affected parts of the world. (sciencemag.org)
  • Labour
  • Although the Coalition government announced their intention to 'move beyond the ASBO' last July (Home Office, 2010a), a concern with the 'anti-social behaviour' of young people is still firmly rooted in political, public and media rhetoric and looks set to become one of the enduring legacies of New Labour. (shu.ac.uk)
  • outreach
  • As Hal Foster pointed out a decade earlier, the "quasi-anthropological artist today may seek to work with sited communities with the best motives of political engagement and institutional transgression, only in part to have this work recoded by its sponsors as social outreach, economic development, public relations … or art. (e-flux.com)
  • public
  • The aim, therefore, of mass - or public - education was not a benevolent concept of expanding and sharing knowledge (as is purported in liberal thought), but rather as a means to foster patriotism and support the state system in preserving the social class structures. (thepeoplesvoice.org)
  • The complexities of our current society call for a new vision and a new practice in the preparation of individuals committed to the education, empowerment and transformation of our public commons. (merrimack.edu)
  • Problems
  • Deflem is elected Chair of the Law and Society division of the Society for the Study of Social Problems. (oup.com)
  • Societies today face several kinds of problems. (ivoryresearch.com)
  • Issues as complicated as the high rate of criminality or others which may appear easier to deal with such as the traffic congestion in the motorways impose problems which modern societies need to deal with. (ivoryresearch.com)
  • The current study will shed some light to these modern problems by looking at the actions and measurements taken by social policy. (ivoryresearch.com)
  • Colored bodies constitute the main human raw material in this vast experiment to disappear the major social problems of our time. (colorlines.com)
  • The prison industrial system materially and morally impoverishes its inhabitants and devours the social wealth needed to address the very problems that have led to spiraling numbers of prisoners. (colorlines.com)
  • Toward a Better Understanding of Social Problems and Policy Making: Institutionalism of William R. Freudenburg. (emeraldinsight.com)
  • If the act causes problems in society here also the act must not continue. (writework.com)
  • services
  • Social workers provide several kinds of services designed to aid the poor and aged and to increase the welfare of children. (ivoryresearch.com)
  • Although many professionals within animal protection have provided case histories in which there was a clear overlap between elder abuse and animal cruelty, it was uncertain if social services professionals recognized this connection. (vactf.org)
  • Pension plans are being reneged on, schools shut down, and innumerable social services that are vital for the well-being of local communities drastically scaled back or eliminated. (socialequality.com)
  • crime
  • Michael Fisher: 'Crime: A Matter of Culture or Policy? (coursera.org)
  • This course seeks to discover alternatives to the current systems of crime and punishment in order to imagine a more inclusive, just and moral society. (coursera.org)
  • A recent Home Office consultation paper on anti-social behaviour strategy suggests that Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) will be dropped, but will be replaced by alternative powers such as 'Criminal Behaviour Orders' and 'Crime Prevention Injunctions' (Home Office, 2011). (shu.ac.uk)
  • welfare
  • It is considered to be a government's course of action designed to influence the welfare of its citizens by dealing with social issues. (ivoryresearch.com)
  • Topics include the social meanings of color, sex/gender systems in historical and contemporary perspectives, theories of power, stereotyping, affirmative action, and welfare debates. (utdallas.edu)
  • relations
  • Any change in social relations that cause a change in a society or transformation of its social structure can be considered to be a social change. (ivoryresearch.com)
  • Similar to homo economicus , the primary function of "artist as x" is to utilize and leverage all possible identities, situations, and social relations for their own benefit. (e-flux.com)
  • prevention
  • Although there are ways to reduce susceptibility to infection and disease, and a high-efficacy vaccine would boost TB prevention, early diagnosis and drug treatment to interrupt transmission remain the top priorities for control. (sciencemag.org)
  • young people
  • Although 'Anti-Social Behaviour Orders' (ASBOs) are likely be dropped by the Coalition government, young people considered to behave 'anti-socially' will continue to be disciplined using alternative legal measures and sanctions (Home Office, 2011). (shu.ac.uk)
  • 10), but young people considered to be transgressive seem set to continue to be disciplined through policies similar to ASBOs in nature. (shu.ac.uk)
  • Health
  • Social workers also happen to be occupied in community health agencies. (ivoryresearch.com)
  • Students will also understand the complex interrelationships between social, environmental, and political factors that affect health and well-being in low- and middle-income countries. (buffalo.edu)
  • More than 36 million patients have been successfully treated via the World Health Organization's strategy for tuberculosis (TB) control since 1995. (sciencemag.org)
  • Fourth, in response to all these observations, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched a new control strategy, based on Directly Observed Treatment and Short-course drug therapy (DOTS). (sciencemag.org)
  • practice
  • Merrimack's School of Education and Social Policy provides the opportunity to learn about, collaborate with and impact PreK-12 schools, colleges and communities through dynamic and focused programs that link theory to practice, excellence to impact, and classrooms with communities. (merrimack.edu)
  • believes
  • IFAC believes that establishing an integrated and effective system of governance, risk management, and internal control is desirable for all types of organizations and can make an invaluable contribution to achieving sustained organizational success. (ifac.org)
  • increasingly
  • The source of this tension requires an examination of the evolutionary roots of human judgement and how these fundamental features may be changing as our civilization increasingly becomes an information and knowledge-based society. (google.ca)
  • But with the end of the Jagiellonian dynasty in 1572, the kingdom once again fell apart as the landed gentry increasingly assumed local control, sapping the strength of the central government in Krakow. (encyclopedia.com)
  • culture
  • SOC 2300 Introduction to Gender Studies (3 semester hours) An introduction to the way gender shapes individuals, social institutions and culture. (utdallas.edu)
  • SOC 3314 Individual and Society (3 semester hours) The study of the relationship among the individual, social structure, and culture. (utdallas.edu)
  • complex
  • The implication, throughout the book, is that cybernetics might provide this new common tongue for the complex, technological societies of the twentieth century. (e-flux.com)