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  • theories
  • The study used two key criminological perspectives, social disorganization theories and opportunity theories, to inform their identification of risk factors in the study and then contrast the impacts of these perspectives in the context of multivariate statistical models. (umich.edu)
  • state's
  • The first six municipalities listed reported numbers that were notably above the state's average, 4 even after controlling for population size. (il.us)
  • behaviors
  • It was designed to advance the understanding of the developmental pathways of both positive and negative human social behaviors. (umich.edu)
  • At the same time, the project also provided a detailed look at the environments in which these social behaviors take place by collecting substantial amounts of data about urban Chicago, including its people, institutions, and resources. (umich.edu)
  • crime
  • This course will enable you to develop an understanding of society and social factors and how this affects crime and criminals, giving you a solid human understanding that will put you in a good position for range of careers or further study. (bcu.ac.uk)
  • Both left and right realism are concerned with building practical responses to crimes which are of public concern, predatory crimes such as violence, street crime and burglary, with this they advocate effective measures that could be used to control crime and the containment of crime and to establish policies in order to reduce crime. (markedbyteachers.com)
  • crime is behaviour that strays outside of the formal, written laws of a society. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • this means to literally move/stray away from set standards in society, it is much more general than crime and refers to behaviour that while different to the norm, it is not necessarily controlled legally. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • society
  • Because this vast social experiment is going on, the question of what our society is willing to pay for the regularization of the use of any intoxicant must be raised and answered. (druglibrary.org)
  • legally
  • INVISIBILTYAND VISIBILITY- Tagging, CCTV, legally enforceable drug routines for the mentally ill are all part of an ever-growing and invisible net or control. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • commitment
  • It is also hypothesized that social bond, in the form of attachment, commitment, involvement and belief, has a positive effect on status achievement. (illinois.edu)
  • Descriptor
  • Medicare Part A" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (harvard.edu)
  • Advisory Committees" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (rush.edu)
  • political
  • The first was an intensive study of Chicago's neighborhood's, particularly the social, economic, organizational, political, and cultural structures and the dynamic changes that take place in the structures over time. (umich.edu)
  • Environment
  • Most significant for this paper, critical and feminist drug researchers emphasize qualitative interviews as a methodological tool that successfully brings to light how people who use drugs learn and make sense of the drugs they consume and the social environment where they use them. (biomedcentral.com)
  • order
  • INDIVIDUALS WHO EITHER DO NOT USE intoxicants (whether alcohol or illicit drugs) or who use them only infrequently in order to keep up with their friends often fail to recognize that others may benefit from regular, controlled use because it brings them relaxation and a sense of freedom from inhibition. (druglibrary.org)
  • groups
  • In other social groups permission may be granted to 'turn on' with marihuana, take a sniff of white powder, or tell of an experience with a psychedelic. (druglibrary.org)
  • class
  • In most communities social contacts are limited by barriers of class, ethnic identity, or other group affiliations, and most rumors are nurtured in well-established informal networks. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Community
  • On the one hand, it is found that family background, personal differences and social bond to family, school and community have strong effects on status achievement in early adulthood. (illinois.edu)
  • important
  • From this date until the near extermination of buffalo in 1883, the relationship between the trading companies and the Blackfoot was important to the Blackfoot's economic and social lives. (encyclopedia.com)
  • experience
  • We use cookies to provide the best experience possible including delivering personalised content on this website, other websites and social media. (bcu.ac.uk)
  • promote
  • This study aims to inform this ongoing debate by answering: (1) whether or not legal sanctions have adverse effects on status achievement of delinquents, and (2) what type of social control, formal or informal, is the best way to promote legitimate social opportunities among troubled youths. (illinois.edu)