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  • genes
  • We used a systematic approach where we utilized similar studies in other species, some biological criteria, results from deep sequencing of small RNAs and, finally, experimental validation of candidate reference genes by qPCR to identify the most suitable reference genes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • genomic
  • hnRNPA2B1 is also implicated in the transport of the genomic RNA of viruses such as HIV to sites of exit to the cell exterior. (phys.org)
  • vesicles
  • Before this study, we already knew that these small molecules could be packaged into small vesicles and exported to the extracellular space, to be later captured by other cells and in this way play an important role in intercellular communication," explains CNIC researcher Carolina Villarroya, the first author on the study. (phys.org)
  • This establishes a parallel between the secretion of vesicles loaded with RNA and the production of viruses that parasitize the cellular machinery to extend infection. (phys.org)
  • Without a magnetic field (0 Tesla, left), the vesicles have a small opening. (phys.org)
  • They have stretched the walls of the vesicles by aligning the molecules in the wall using the strong magnets of the High Field Magnet Laboratory (HFML). (phys.org)
  • scientists
  • The EMBL scientists looked at the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii, which is thought to have changed little over the past 600 million years.They found that in Platynereis these microRNAs are highly specific for certain tissues and cell types and, what is more, discovered that tissue specificity was conserved over hundreds of millions of years of evolutionary time. (dailygalaxy.com)
  • The scientists reasoned that if an ancient microRNA is found in a specific part of the brain in one species and in a very similar location in another species, then this brain part probably already existed in the last common ancestor of those species. (dailygalaxy.com)
  • Knowing where microRNAs were expressed in our ancestors could also help scientists understand the role of specific microRNA molecules today, as it gives them a clue of where to look. (dailygalaxy.com)
  • Last fall Dr. Peter Sarnow and a team of Stanford University scientists reported that the hepatitis C virus needs a specific microRNA, named miR-122, in order to replicate in cultured liver cells. (innovations-report.com)
  • When the scientists inactivated the microRNA, the amount of hepatitis C virus RNA was reduced by approximately 80 percent. (innovations-report.com)
  • specific
  • The DNA circuit and protein activity was turned "on" by specific RNA/DNA sequence inputs, while in the absence of said inputs the system stayed "off. (technologynetworks.com)
  • Animals from different branches of the evolutionary tree - different lineages - possess specific microRNAs that evolved only in their lineage, but they also have microRNAs in common: ones which they inherited from their last common ancestor, and which have been conserved throughout animal evolution. (dailygalaxy.com)
  • We found that annelids such as Platynereis and vertebrates such as ourselves share some microRNAs that are specific to the parts of the central nervous system that secrete hormones into the blood, and others that are restricted to other parts of the central or peripheral nervous systems, or to gut or musculature', explains Foteini Christodoulou, who carried out most of the experimental work. (dailygalaxy.com)
  • These molecules appear to be cancer-specific and hold great promise for molecular profiling of tumors. (fredhutch.org)
  • The first strand, called the "sense" transcript, produces messenger RNA, which carries the recipe for making a specific protein. (innovations-report.com)
  • If we can establish that there is cancer in the pancreas because the sensor detects high levels of microRNA-10b or one of the other microRNAs associated with that specific cancer, we may be able to treat it sooner," said Murray Korc, M.D., the Myles Brand Professor of Cancer Research at the IU School of Medicine and a researcher at the IU Simon Cancer Center. (nanowerk.com)
  • After dipping it in a sample of blood or another body fluid, the scientist measures the change in the nanoprism's optical property to determine the levels of specific microRNAs. (nanowerk.com)
  • Prostate
  • Dr. Muneesh Tewari's project is on the cutting edge of a new technology whereby diagnosis, prognosis and optimal prostate-cancer treatment strategy might be determined by analysis of circulating microRNAs. (fredhutch.org)
  • Tewari will optimize the isolation of exosomes and purification of microRNAs from prostate cancer models followed by genetic probing of these materials. (fredhutch.org)
  • development
  • In addition, it is known that abnormal amounts of microRNA stimulate the onset and development of different diseases, such as cancer. (eurekalert.org)
  • The crosstalk achieved by this microRNA-based signaling was found to be necessary for normal blood vessel development. (yaledailynews.com)
  • Since its introduction on the commercial market little more than 10 years ago, real-time PCR has become the main technical platform for nucleic acid detection in research and development, as well as in routine diagnostics. (ddw-online.com)
  • cell
  • excess of this particular microRNA in cancer cells leads to significant suppression of Aurora B kinase, which is an essential protein needed for faithful cell division. (eurekalert.org)
  • levels
  • Because certain statin drugs - a class of medications that lower cholesterol levels - are known to influence this microRNA, the discovery will empower researchers to develop new treatments for vascular disease, according to the study. (yaledailynews.com)
  • They also report on the promising results of tests of the sensor's ability to identify pancreatic cancer or indicate the existence of a benign condition by quantifying changes in levels of microRNA signatures linked to pancreatic cancer. (nanowerk.com)
  • The beauty of the sensor designed by Dr. Sardar is its ability to accurately detect mild increases in microRNA levels, which could allow for early cancer diagnosis," Korc added. (nanowerk.com)
  • different
  • By looking at where in the body different microRNAs evolved, we can build a picture of ancestors for which we have no fossils, and uncover traits that fossils simply cannot show us,' says Detlev Arendt, who headed the study: 'But uncovering where these ancient microRNAs are expressed in animals from different branches of the evolutionary tree has so far been very challenging. (dailygalaxy.com)
  • They will also experiment with different types of wall molecules. (phys.org)
  • found
  • We found that maturation of blood vessels in vertebrates require 'turning on' or 'shutting off' of distinct signaling pathways through a microRNA," Chun said in a Sunday email to the News. (yaledailynews.com)
  • help
  • The next step in the research, Green said, will be to try to understand how microRNAs help rice plants respond to adverse environmental conditions, such as drought or limited nutrient availability. (innovations-report.com)
  • particles
  • Using gold nanoprisms may sound expensive, but it isn't because these particles are so very tiny," Sardar said. (nanowerk.com)
  • certain
  • If a certain microRNA is known to have evolved in the gut, for instance, it is likely to still carry out a function there', explains EMBL scientist Peer Bork, who also contributed to the study. (dailygalaxy.com)
  • diagnostic
  • Nanowerk News ) A simple, ultrasensitive microRNA sensor developed and tested by researchers from the schools of science and medicine at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center holds promise for the design of new diagnostic strategies and, potentially, for the prognosis and treatment of pancreatic and other cancers. (nanowerk.com)
  • present
  • When the cancer microRNAs were present and able to turn the DNA circuit on, cells were unable to grow. (technologynetworks.com)
  • Green noted that such microRNAs are not present in the common research plant Arabidopsis, which is a dicotyledon, a plant group that has two seed leaves (cotyledons) when it first sprouts. (innovations-report.com)
  • allow
  • Chemist Daniela Wilson explains how the two lines of research could ultimately be combined: 'Suppose you fill the vesicle with fuel and medicines, then you could transport the vesicle by creating a small opening and only allow the fuel to get out. (phys.org)
  • Heating to 95° would separate the strands of the double stranded nucleic acid template, a temperature between 50-60° will allow primer oligonucleotides to hybridise to the complementary template strands, and raising the temperature to 72° will activate the heat stable polymerase from Thermus aquaticus to extend the primers generating a copy of the template molecule. (ddw-online.com)