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  • stationary phases
  • The stationary phases are usually finely ground powders or gels and/or are microporous for an increased surface, though in EBA a fluidized bed is used. (wikipedia.org)
  • commercially
  • besides, it is very easily available commercially in many different forms and sizes and there is a lot of research and information that is provided by the manufacturers on its numerous uses, especially in chromatography. (list.ly)
  • another
  • Megaphone acetate was also isolated from the root of Endlicheria dysodantha, another plant of Laurel family, using chromatography of ethanolic solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chemistry
  • It was pioneering when it was reported by Werner Stöber and his team in 1968, and remains today the most widely used wet chemistry synthetic approach to silica nanoparticles. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The synthetic route for producing silica gel was patented by chemistry professor Walter A. Patrick at Johns Hopkins University in 1918. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • Other molecular sieves are used as desiccants (some examples include activated charcoal and silica gel). (wikipedia.org)
  • Silicon dioxide (used to make silica gel): 24 Å (2.4 nm) Mesoporous silica, 200-1000 Å (20-100 nm) Molecular sieves are often utilized in the petroleum industry, especially for drying gas streams. (wikipedia.org)
  • synthetic
  • In World War II, silica gel was indispensable in the war effort for keeping penicillin dry, protecting military equipment from moisture damage[citation needed], as a fluid cracking catalyst for the production of high octane gasoline, and as a catalyst support for the manufacture of butadiene from ethanol, feedstock for the synthetic rubber program. (wikipedia.org)
  • diameter
  • Eventually, chemists were using coiled glass or fused silica capillary tubes less than a millimeter in diameter and many yards long. (encyclopedia.com)
  • toxic
  • Since such packets may resemble sachets of sugar or salt and because silica gel may have added toxic chemical indicators (see below), silica gel packets usually bear warnings for the user not to eat the contents. (wikipedia.org)
  • material
  • Silica produced using the Stöber process is an ideal material to serve as a model for studying colloid phenomena because of the monodispersity (uniformity) of its particle sizes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type C - translucent, micro-pored structure, raw material for preparation of silica gel cat litter. (wikipedia.org)
  • specific
  • Applying supercritical drying techniques, a Stöber silica aerogel with a specific surface area of 700 m2 g−1 and a density of 0.040 g cm−3 can be prepared. (wikipedia.org)
  • Silica gel's high specific surface area (around 800 m2/g) allows it to adsorb water readily, making it useful as a desiccant (drying agent). (wikipedia.org)
  • main
  • Because of the abundant separating columns, elution systems, and detectors available, chromatography has developed into the main method for ion analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • Once saturated with water, the gel can be regenerated by heating it to 120 °C (250 °F) for 1-2 hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Highly effective thermal insulators known as aerogels can also be prepared using Stöber methods, and Stöber techniques have been applied to prepare non-silica aerogel systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • produce
  • An aqueous solution of sodium silicate is acidified to produce a gelatinous precipitate that is washed, then dehydrated to produce colorless silica gel. (wikipedia.org)
  • similar
  • It is common for a small compressed air system (similar to a small home aquarium pump) to be employed to circulate the air inside the waveguide over a jar of silica gel. (wikipedia.org)