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  • genome sequences
  • Continued study of exome and genome sequences can help determine whether new genetic variations are associated with health conditions, which will aid disease diagnosis in the future. (nih.gov)
  • Transcription factor binding sites ( TFBSs ) are the functional elements that determine transcriptional activity, and the identification of individual TFBS in genome sequences is a major goal to inferring regulatory networks. (plantcell.org)
  • cDNA
  • A small number of laboratories reported the development of new techniques (at that time, for example, exon trapping, cDNA hybrid selection, direct cDNA screening, use of splice junction conserved sequences,etc.), but data were too limited to permit comparisons of their relative efficiencies. (springer.com)
  • For those of you that don't know, we do the informatics side of Tom Newman's Arabidopsis cDNA sequencing, which, for the moment is ESTs, but there are plans for complete sequencing in the future. (bio.net)
  • exons
  • Together, all the exons in a genome are known as the exome, and the method of sequencing them is known as whole exome sequencing. (nih.gov)
  • Because most known mutations that cause disease occur in exons, whole exome sequencing is thought to be an efficient method to identify possible disease-causing mutations. (nih.gov)
  • However, researchers have found that DNA variations outside the exons can affect gene activity and protein production and lead to genetic disorders--variations that whole exome sequencing would miss. (nih.gov)
  • lengths
  • Use a distance method such as neighbor-joining, and calculate distances between sequences as percent difference--you can calculate this even with sequences of different lengths, though it will not be as accurate as it would with full sequences, especially if variability is not randomly distributed across your gene. (bio.net)
  • identification
  • DNA sequencing may be used along with DNA profiling methods for forensic identification and paternity testing . (wikipedia.org)
  • The First International Workshop on the Identification of Transcribed Sequences in the Human Genome was held in 1991 and was attended by 23 investigators. (springer.com)
  • Sequencing is increasingly important in forensic science and in the rapid and positive identification of potential pathogens that can be exploited by bioterrorists. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Algorithm
  • In 1970, Saul B. Needleman and Christian D. Wunsch published the first computer algorithm for aligning two sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two important algorithms for aligning pairs of sequences are the Needleman-Wunsch algorithm and the Smith-Waterman algorithm. (wikipedia.org)
  • repetitive
  • Assembly of complex genomes is additionally complicated by the great abundance of repetitive sequences , meaning similar short reads could come from completely different parts of the sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • cytosine
  • Depending on the sequencing technique, a particular modification, e.g., the 5mC ( 5 methyl cytosine ) common in humans, may or may not be detected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sequencing refers to the techniques used to determine the order of the constituent bases (i.e., adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine) of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or protein. (encyclopedia.com)
  • canonical form
  • 4 . Interoperability Considerations The advantage of using ASCII character RS "0x1e" to denote a text is that sequence producers and parsers need not enforce a canonical form of GeoJSON. (ietf.org)
  • While there is no canonical form for JSON texts, and pretty-printed and compact forms are equally valid, GeoJSON text sequences containing compact GeoJSON texts with no internal newlines are more interoperable with existing non-standardized parsers. (ietf.org)
  • computational
  • From the computational results reported in this paper (see Table 1 ) it appears that there may be only finitely many sporadic normal sequences. (hindawi.com)
  • Abstract
  • Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) S. Gillies Request for Comments: 8142 Mapbox Category: Standards Track April 2017 ISSN: 2070-1721 GeoJSON Text Sequences Abstract This document describes the GeoJSON text sequence format and "application/geo+json-seq" media type. (ietf.org)
  • method
  • The Halton sequence is constructed according to a deterministic method that uses coprime numbers as its bases. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2. Make a number of subtrees (using whatever method you would normally prefer)--for example, one that includes every sequence for which you have C-terminus data, truncating the long ones, and another that includes every sequence for which you have N-terminus data. (bio.net)
  • GenBank
  • Sequences of Chlamydomonas and other Volvocales appearing on GenBank in the past month: LOCUS CRU27120 875 bp mRNA PLN 15-JUN-1995 DEFINITION Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) mRNA, complete cds. (bio.net)
  • reads
  • However, GBS has unique technical considerations, including a substantial amount of missing data and a nonuniform distribution of sequence reads. (genetics.org)
  • Multiple overlapping reads for the target DNA are obtained by performing several rounds of this fragmentation and sequencing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Computer programs then use the overlapping ends of different reads to assemble them into a continuous sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this extremely simplified example, none of the reads cover the full length of the original sequence, but the four reads can be assembled into the original sequence using the overlap of their ends to align and order them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many overlapping reads for each segment of the original DNA are necessary to overcome these difficulties and accurately assemble the sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • that is, each base in the final sequence was present on average in 12 different reads. (wikipedia.org)
  • fragment
  • As sequencing projects began to take on longer and more complicated DNA sequences, multiple groups began to realize that useful information could be obtained by sequencing both ends of a fragment of DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the time, there was community consensus that the optimal fragment length for pairwise end sequencing would be three times the sequence read length. (wikipedia.org)
  • The preceding steps should be repeated with a different fragment pattern so that the overall protein sequence can be reconstructed with minimal errors. (news-medical.net)
  • increasingly
  • In sociology, sequence methods are increasingly used to study life-course and career trajectories, patterns of organizational and national development, conversation and interaction structure, and the problem of work/family synchrony. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • The first DNA sequences were obtained in the early 1970s by academic researchers using laborious methods based on two-dimensional chromatography . (wikipedia.org)
  • Another
  • Another solution is the leaped Halton, which skips points in the standard sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Elliptic divisibility sequences are another class of such sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another protein sequencing technique is called fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, or FAB-MS. This is a powerful technique in which the sample is bombarded with a stream of fast atoms, such as argon. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Still another protein sequencing strategy is the digestion of the protein with specialized protein-degrading enzymes called proteases. (encyclopedia.com)
  • process
  • In reality, this process uses enormous amounts of information that are rife with ambiguities and sequencing errors. (wikipedia.org)
  • In bioinformatics, sequence analysis is the process of subjecting a DNA, RNA or peptide sequence to any of a wide range of analytical methods to understand its features, function, structure, or evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • methods
  • both methods rely on new technologies that allow rapid sequencing of large amounts of DNA. (nih.gov)
  • Following the development of fluorescence -based sequencing methods with a DNA sequencer , DNA sequencing has become easier and orders of magnitude faster. (wikipedia.org)
  • In statistics , Halton sequences are sequences used to generate points in space for numerical methods such as Monte Carlo simulations . (wikipedia.org)
  • Although sequences are the primary multivalue data type in JavaFX, there is also basic support for Java arrays, which are supported only to make it possible to efficiently work with Java methods that require array arguments or return array values. (oreilly.com)
  • rely
  • In a distributed system where order and exactly-once delivery of messages are difficult to achieve, GeoJSON text sequences that do not rely on order of texts for extra semantics are more interoperable than those that do. (ietf.org)