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  • test
  • By labeling such complementary probe nucleic acids with some readily detectable chemical group, it was then made possible to detect the presence of any polynucleotide sequence of interest in a test medium containing sample nucleic acids in single stranded form. (google.ca)
  • The ability to resurrect sequences from the dead and test them relieves us from these temporal limitations. (openwetware.org)
  • function
  • It includes sophisticated editing options and provides a range of analysis tools to investigate the structure and function of macromolecules through a multiple window interface. (jalview.org)
  • RNAs
  • Analyses of histone modifications have provided insights on how the genome is organized and the functional domains across the entire genome which has enabled scientists to predict and validate an array of large, non-coding RNAs. (news-medical.net)
  • This was based on the observation that Spot42 contains structural features similar to other non-coding RNAs found in E. coli (such as 6S RNA and lambda bacteriophage), as well as features that are typically found in mRNAs (i.e., polypurine sequence followed by AUG, 14 amino acids and an UGA terminator). (wikipedia.org)
  • There, he sequenced the first large ribosomal RNAs via their genes utilizing the Maxam-Gilbert sequencing method. (wikipedia.org)
  • detects
  • tRNAscan-SE - tRNA detection in genome sequences, detects ~99% of eukaryotic nuclear or prokaryotic tRNA genes, with a false positive rate of less than one per 15 gigabases, and with a search speed of about 30 kb/second. (bioinformatics.org)
  • Targeted sequencing detects and provides understanding of cell-to-cell differences, which is essential to not only identifying key mechanisms of pathogenesis, but developing therapeutic strategies with an eye towards personalized medicine. (the-scientist.com)
  • tRNA
  • Subsequent sequence comparison revealed the full tRNA-like domain (TLD) formed by the 5' and 3' ends of tmRNA, including the acceptor stem with elements like those in alanine tRNA that promote its aminoacylation by alanine-tRNA ligase. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulatory
  • Transcription factor binding sites ( TFBSs ) are the functional elements that determine transcriptional activity, and the identification of individual TFBS in genome sequences is a major goal to inferring regulatory networks. (plantcell.org)
  • Particularly I am interesting in scaning, analysis and comparisons of the clusters of the transcription factors binding sites (such as regulatory sites in Drosophilian even-skipped, rhomboid or Kruppel genes). (bio.net)
  • Toucan - A Java tool for regulatory sequence analysis: detecting over-represented motifs and modules in sets of co-regulated genes. (bioinformatics.org)
  • Here, Brosius began to develop plasmid vectors for the selection of promoters and terminators, as well as widely used vectors for the high-level expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli, often employing regulatory sequences or modules from the rRNA operon. (wikipedia.org)
  • trajectories
  • In sociology, sequence methods are increasingly used to study life-course and career trajectories, patterns of organizational and national development, conversation and interaction structure, and the problem of work/family synchrony. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sequence analysis, originally developed in biology to analyse DNA sequences, is a longitudinal method that allows to analyse such trajectories, or sequences of different states in a life course, different states in a country's development or any other sequence of interest. (wzb.eu)
  • There has been a great deal of work on the sequential development of careers, and there is increasing interest in how career trajectories intertwine with life-course sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • identification
  • We have developed a phylogenetic footprinting approach for the identification of conserved noncoding sequences ( CNSs ) across 12 dicot plants. (plantcell.org)
  • For example, analysis of DNA binding sites in the mouse brain has led to the identification of new tissue-specific regulatpry areas (enhancers) of genes. (news-medical.net)
  • rRNA
  • It took ~2.5 years to sequence the 7.5 kilobases encompassing the entire rrnB rRNA operon in addition to some flanking regions. (wikipedia.org)
  • social sequence analysis
  • This body of research has given rise to the emerging subfield of social sequence analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social sequence analysis involves the examination of ordered social processes, ranging from microsocial interaction patterns (for example, turn-taking dynamics in conversations) and interpersonal contact dynamics to the development of social hierarchies and macrosocial temporal patterns. (wikipedia.org)
  • biology
  • Such a collection of sequences does not, by itself, increase the scientist's understanding of the biology of organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, comparing these new sequences to those with known functions is a key way of understanding the biology of an organism from which the new sequence comes. (wikipedia.org)
  • FASTA
  • All three programs accept sequence in plain, Fasta, EMBL or GenBank format, and output the sequence, with an added feature table, in EMBL or GenBank format. (bio.net)
  • repetitive elements
  • RepFind, Version 1.7 (download as repfin17.exe) RepFind identifies common repetitive elements in DNA sequence. (bio.net)
  • In the early 1980s, Brosius became interested in a small brain-specific RNA that was thought to be a waste product of a mechanism orchestrating the expression of genes by RNA polymerase III transcription of identifier sequence (ID) repetitive elements, classified as SINEs, short interspersed repeats, located in the introns of brain-specific genes by making chromatin accessible to RNA polymerase II. (wikipedia.org)
  • comparisons
  • Start Your Software Evaluation Today: Download a FREE demo of OMIGA 2.0 (or request a demo CD) at http://www.gcg.com/om-omiga For software comparisons, OMIGA has been singled out as the best sequence analysis desktop package by reviewers from 'Science,' 'HMS Beagle' and the 'Biotechnology Software and Internet Journal. (bio.net)
  • identify
  • The program is user-extendible to identify any repetitive sequence of interest in any organism. (bio.net)
  • information to identify these regions in a given sequence? (bio.net)
  • This is a structured attempt to identify and visually display sequences of behaviour, thinking, and emotions so that the patient becomes more aware of these and can start to modify them. (wikipedia.org)
  • increasingly
  • This focus on regularized patterns of social action has become an increasingly influential framework for understanding microsocial interaction and contact sequences, or "microsequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • repeats
  • As an option, repeats or vector sequence can be masked with the letter 'n' to facilitate database searches. (bio.net)