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  • negligible senescence
  • The discovery, in 1934, that calorie restriction can extend lifespan by 50% in rats, and the existence of species having negligible senescence and potentially immortal species such as Hydra, have motivated research into delaying and preventing senescence and thus age-related diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Negligible senescence is the lack of symptoms of aging in some organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • The phenomenon of negligible senescence in some animals is a traditional argument for attempting to achieve similar negligible senescence in humans by technological means. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent studies have indicated a connection between phenomena related to negligible senescence and the general stability of an organism's genome, specifically transcription processes, over its lifetime. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Biological immortality DNA damage theory of aging Indefinite lifespan Maximum lifespan Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence Warner, Daniel A. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence (SENS) is the term coined by British biogerontologist Aubrey de Grey for the diverse range of regenerative medical therapies, either planned or currently in development, for the periodical repair of all age-related damage to human tissue with the ultimate purpose of maintaining a state of negligible senescence in the patient, thereby postponing age-associated disease for as long as the therapies are reapplied. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term "negligible senescence" was first used in the early 1990s by professor Caleb Finch to describe organisms such as lobsters and hydras, which do not show symptoms of aging. (wikipedia.org)
  • senescent
  • Ectopic expression of the embryonic transcription factor, NANOG, is shown to reverse senescence and restore the proliferation and differentiation potential of senescent stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some fish, such as some varieties of sturgeon and rougheye rockfish, and some tortoises and turtles are thought to be negligibly senescent, although recent research on turtles has uncovered evidence of senescence in the wild. (wikipedia.org)
  • Senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal or SABG) is a hypothetical hydrolase enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-galactosides into monosaccharides only in senescent cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Notably, while most senescence markers, irrespective of their specificity and sensitivity, may only be assessed in endpoint assays, we would like to emphasize here the strength of viable fSA-β-gal to track single-cell fate in senescent populations over time. (springer.com)
  • secretory
  • The results of this study were published on-line by the Public Library of Science (PLoS) in a paper entitled: "Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor. (eurekalert.org)
  • mitochondrial
  • Provision of a drug, a quasi-drug, and a food or beverage, which are effective for senescence inhibition, mitochondrial function improvement, muscle dysfunction inhibition, muscular atrophy inhibition, prevention of a bedridden state, muscle senescence inhibition, or motor function improvement. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • A senescence inhibitor, a mitochondrial function-improving agent, a muscle dysfunction inhibitor, a muscular atrophy inhibitor, and an agent for preventing a bedridden state, containing a catechin as an effective ingredient. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Title Mitochondrial group II introns, cytochrome c oxidase, and senescence in Podospora anserina. (bio.net)
  • It expresses a degenerative syndrome called senescence, which is always associated with the accumulation of circular molecules (senDNAs) containing specific regions of the mitochondrial chromosome. (bio.net)
  • Mitochondrial mutants that escape the senescence process are missing this intron, as well as the first exon of the COX1 gene. (bio.net)
  • proliferation
  • Given the lack of a single specific senescence-defining marker, we previously exploited co-staining of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity with immunohistochemical detection of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3), an established S-phase gene expression-controlling, repressive chromatin mark, and the proliferation marker Ki67. (springer.com)
  • Chang BD, Xuan Y, Broude EV, Zhu H, Schott B, Fang J, Roninson IB (1999) Role of p53 and p21waf1/cip1 in senescence-like terminal proliferation arrest induced in human tumor cells by chemotherapeutic drugs. (springer.com)
  • And still others are investigating how senescence limits stem cell proliferation. (afar.org)
  • undergo
  • Unlike animals, plants continually form new organs and older organs undergo a highly regulated senescence program to maximize nutrient export. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism ages
  • that exhibit negative senescence, whereby mortality chronologically decreases as the organism ages, for all or part of the life cycle, in disagreement with the Gompertz-Makeham law of mortality (see also Late-life mortality deceleration). (wikipedia.org)
  • marker
  • Furthermore, small hybrid RNAs were used to decrease expression of Wnt2 in young fibroblasts, and this promoted formation of SAHF, the authors' marker of senescence. (sciencemag.org)
  • leaf
  • Chlorophyll degradation during leaf senescence reveals the carotenoids, and is the cause of autumn leaf color in deciduous trees. (wikipedia.org)
  • Leaf senescence has the important function of recycling nutrients, mostly nitrogen, to growing and storage organs of the plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cytokinins help to maintain the plant cell and expression of cytokinin biosynthesis genes late in development prevents leaf senescence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abscission in these deciduous plants is often considered as a part of their senescence, although the process of leaf abscission and the formation of a leaf scar is an active process. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Leaf senescence is directly related to plant productivity and therefore its implication in the area of agricultural biotechnology is important. (springer.com)
  • Biswal B (1995) Carotenoid catabolism during leaf senescence and its control by light. (springer.com)
  • Biswal UC and Biswal B (1984) Photocontrol of leaf senescence. (springer.com)
  • genes
  • Macromolecular degradation and mobilization of the breakdown products that participate in the nutrient recycling mechanism are mediated by up-regulation of senescence-related genes. (springer.com)
  • proteins
  • In the present study, we have employed immunohistochemistry (IHC) and analysed a cohort of 17 MLS/RCLS cases for expression of proteins associated with growth control and senescence. (hindawi.com)
  • diseases
  • The ultimate objective of SENS is the eventual elimination of age-related diseases and infirmity by repeatedly reducing the state of senescence in the organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • This chapter focuses on immune senescence and inflammaging and their potential role in the etiopathogenesis of neurological diseases. (springer.com)
  • biological
  • Senescence (/sɪˈnɛsəns/) or biological aging (also spelled biological ageing) is the gradual deterioration of function characteristic of most complex lifeforms, arguably found in all biological kingdoms, that on the level of the organism increases mortality after maturation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whether senescence as a biological process itself can be slowed down, halted or even reversed, is a subject of current scientific speculation and research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Senescence pertains to the biological aging of a living thing. (biology-online.org)
  • ingredient
  • These results suggest that embelin has a potential as an antiaging cosmetic ingredient with antioxidant and anti-senescence properties. (springer.com)
  • plant
  • Plant senescence is the process of aging in plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Programmed senescence seems to be heavily influenced by plant hormones. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a world increasingly dominated by global markets for fruits, vegetables, and horticultural products, including cut flowers, people's ability to control the rate of senescence in plant tissues has become one of the most important technologies. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Strategies
  • These strategies do not presuppose that the underlying metabolic mechanisms of aging be fully understood, only that we take into account the form senescence takes as directly observable to science, and described in scientific literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • markers
  • These new data and concepts provide a possible explanation for the expression patterns observed in MLS/RCLS and prompted a renewed investigation with focus on senescence markers. (hindawi.com)
  • represents
  • Recent advances have convincingly demonstrated that senescence represents a true barrier to the progression of many types of cancer, including melanoma. (nih.gov)
  • mechanism
  • In fact, some hypothesize that the senescence program originally evolved as an antiviral mechanism. (qiagen.com)
  • Thus, understanding the mechanism(s) by which melanoma evades senescence has become a priority in the melanoma research community. (nih.gov)
  • 1988
  • Biswal UC and Biswal B (1988) Ultrastructural modifications and biochemical changes during senescence of chloroplasts. (springer.com)
  • lethal
  • Once senescence is overcome, the nevus can exhibit dysplastic features and readily progress to more lethal stages. (nih.gov)