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  • soils
  • In Finland, selenium salts are added to chemical fertilizers, as a way to increase selenium in soils. (wikipedia.org)
  • These plants are able to grow only on seleniferous soils, and are called primary selenium indicators. (news-medical.net)
  • Other selenium accumulators also exist, which can grow on selenium-poor soils, and these are secondary soil accumulators. (news-medical.net)
  • Exposure to selenium is primarily through food, and in some areas with seleniferous soils, through drinking water. (news-medical.net)
  • Demonstrations of its essentiality to rats and farm animals were followed by appreciation that the development of selenium-responsive diseases often reflected the distribution of geochemical variables which restricted the entry of the element from soils into food chains. (fao.org)
  • Values from 3 mg in New Zealanders to 14 mg in some Americans reflect the profound influence of the natural environment on the selenium contents of soils, crops, and human tissues. (fao.org)
  • Maine soils are generally very low in selenium. (mofga.org)
  • Bruce Hoskins of the Maine Soil Testing Service does not recommend Se fertilization but suggests that livestock producers feed the animals supplements, or buy in soy meal, alfalfa meal or grains produced in the West, where soils are high in selenium. (mofga.org)
  • Selsun Blue
  • Zinc pyrithione, an antimicrobial agent used in many off the shelf shampoos Selsun Blue, a shampoo with selenium disulfide as its active ingredient Ketoconazole, another antifungal agent used in medicated shampoos WHO Model Formulary 2008 (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • toxicity
  • As of now, selenium toxicity is diagnosed based upon the presence of features of selenosis in humans, since there are no accurate biochemical or preclinical parameters. (news-medical.net)
  • Selenium toxicity in animals was detected by the occurrence of neurological and muscular symptoms in cattle during the 1930's. (news-medical.net)
  • In animals, selenium toxicity has also been associated with abnormal fetal development in cattle, swine and sheep, but with infertility and a higher proportion of runt offspring and fetal deaths. (news-medical.net)
  • The symptoms of chronic selenium toxicity or selenosis first appear as a garlicky odor in the breath, and a metallic taste in the mouth. (news-medical.net)
  • In China, people who ingested corn grown in extremely selenium-rich stony coal (carbonaceous shale) have suffered from selenium toxicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • disulfide
  • Selenium disulfide , also known as selenium sulfide , is a medication used to treat pityriasis versicolor , seborrhoeic dermatitis , and dandruff . (wikipedia.org)
  • Selenium disulfide was approved for medical use in the United States at least as early as 1951. (wikipedia.org)
  • Selenium disulfide is available as a generic medication and over the counter . (wikipedia.org)
  • Selenium disulfide is sold as an antifungal agent in shampoos for the treatment of dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis associated in the scalp with fungi of genus Malassezia . (wikipedia.org)
  • At the 2.5% strength, selenium disulfide is also used on the body to treat Tinea versicolor , a type of fungal skin infection caused by a different species of Malassezia . (wikipedia.org)
  • Selenium disulfide can cause discoloration of the hair and alter the color of hair dyes . (wikipedia.org)
  • trace
  • Selenium salts are toxic in large amounts, but trace amounts are necessary for cellular function in many organisms, including all animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • In humans, selenium is a trace element nutrient that functions as cofactor for glutathione peroxidases and certain forms of thioredoxin reductase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although selenium is an essential trace element, it is toxic if taken in excess. (wikipedia.org)
  • thyroid hormone
  • Selenium is also involved in converting thyroid hormone, converting methionine to cysteine, and producing the immunoglobulin antibodies IgM and IgG in the immune system and in the colostrum. (mofga.org)
  • atom
  • It converts hydrazones of hindered ketones into the corresponding selones, the structural analogs of ketones whereby the oxygen atom is replaced with a selenium atom. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitamin
  • SELECT stands for the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial. (cancer.gov)
  • However, the independent Data and Safety Monitoring Committee (DSMC) for the trial met on September 15, 2008, to review SELECT study data and found that selenium and vitamin E, taken alone or together did not prevent prostate cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • Men taking selenium alone, or vitamin E and selenium, were also more likely to develop prostate cancer than men taking placebo, but those increases were smaller and are not statistically significant and may be due to chance. (cancer.gov)
  • In concert with vitamin E, selenium is also involved in the protection of cell membranes against oxidative damage (see Chapter 6 , Chapter 9 , and Chapter 17 ). (fao.org)
  • iodine
  • The consequences of a low selenium status on physiologic responses to a shortage of iodine are complex. (fao.org)
  • dietary
  • In general, absorption of dietary selenium is lower in ruminants than in non-ruminants, and is lower from forages than from grain. (wikipedia.org)
  • A reduction of 21% on TPO antibodies was reported with the dietary intake of 0.2 mg of selenium. (wikipedia.org)
  • amorphous
  • When prepared in chemical reactions, selenium is usually an amorphous, brick-red powder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Owing to its use as a photoconductor in flat-panel x-ray detectors (see below), the optical properties of amorphous selenium (α-Se) thin films have been the subject of intense research. (wikipedia.org)
  • The selenium starting material is reduced to selenium, and precipitates as a red amorphous solid which can easily be filtered off. (wikipedia.org)