• Scientists say they have created five grams of yellowcake - a powdered form of uranium used to produce fuel for nuclear power production - using acrylic fibers to extract it from seawater. (reuters.com)
  • Seawater includes uranium in low concentrations but great quantities, and many scientists see it as a key to meeting the world's future energy needs through nuclear power. (csmonitor.com)
  • Scientists have tried to extract uranium from seawater since the 1960s, Rogers noted. (csmonitor.com)
  • Now, an electrochemical method using modified carbon electrodes is shown to be promising for the extraction of uranium from seawater. (osti.gov)
  • article{osti_1361344, title = {Uranium extraction: Fuel from seawater}, author = {Tsouris, Costas and Oak Ridge National Lab. (osti.gov)
  • Alkaline conditioning of the amidoxime based adsorbents is a significant step in the preparation of the adsorbent for uranium uptake from seawater. (osti.gov)
  • In order to ensure a sustainable reserve of fuel for nuclear power generation, tremendous research efforts have been devoted to developing advanced sorbent materials for extracting uranium from seawater. (osti.gov)
  • December 17, 2015 - An ultra-high-resolution technique used for the first time to study polymer fibers that trap uranium in seawater may cause researchers to rethink the best methods to harvest this potential fuel for nuclear reactors. (ornl.gov)
  • Despite the low concentration of uranium and the presence of many other metals extracted from seawater, we were able to investigate the local atomic environment around uranium and better understand how it is bound by the polymer fibers," Abney said. (ornl.gov)
  • Abney and colleagues plan to use this knowledge to design adsorbents that can harness the vast reserves of uranium dissolved in seawater. (ornl.gov)
  • But Navrotsky and others have since discovered a new way in which seawater can corrode nuclear fuel, forming uranium compounds that could potentially travel long distances, either in solution or as very small particles. (eponline.com)
  • Japan used seawater to avoid a much more serious accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi plant, and Navrotsky said, to her knowledge, there is no evidence of long-distance uranium contamination from the plant. (eponline.com)
  • In other words, these clusters could form on the surface of a fuel rod exposed to seawater and then be transported away, surviving in the environment for months or years before reverting to more common forms of uranium, without peroxide, and settling to the bottom of the ocean. (eponline.com)
  • Aside from calcium chloride salts, seawater also contains sulfates (7.7% of dissolved salts), magnesium (3.7%), calcium (1.2%), potassium (1.1%), and minor constituents (0.7%), including trace amounts of inorganic carbon (0.2%), bromide (0.08%), uranium (0.00000001%), and gold (similar amount). (wisegeek.com)
  • It calls for seawater desalination to produce about 116,000 acre-feet of new water supply per year by 2070. (rgj.com)
  • This article describes a technique for optimizing the flocculant dosing rate in the water treatment process by using machine learning, which requires experienced staff, and also a system that improves the recovery rate of seawater desalination to produce more fresh water from a given size of plant. (hitachi.com)
  • The key for understanding critical processes of the marine carbon cycle is a sound knowledge of the seawater carbonate chemistry, including equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties as well as stable isotope fractionation. (elsevier.com)
  • It also deals with the nonequilibrium properties of the seawater carbonate chemistry. (elsevier.com)
  • I want to get the latest chemistry news from C&EN in my inbox every week. (acs.org)
  • Unfortunately, these natural sinks aren't equipped to handle the high levels of gases humans generate, and when oceans absorb a large amount of CO 2 -, the gas changes the chemistry of the seawater so that the natural weathering of rocks can't balance acidification. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Seawater chemistry is characterized by long phases of stability, which are interrupted by short intervals of rapid change,' says geoscientist Ulrich Wortmann of the University of Toronto, lead author of a paper reporting the results and published this week in the journal Science . (nsf.gov)
  • When India and Eurasia collided, it caused dissolution of ancient salt deposits, which resulted in drastic changes in seawater chemistry. (nsf.gov)
  • Abrupt changes in seawater composition are a new twist in our understanding of the links among ocean chemistry, plate tectonics, climate and evolution,' says Candace Major, program director in NSF's Division of Ocean Sciences. (nsf.gov)
  • While it's been known for a long time that gypsum deposits can be formed and destroyed rapidly, the effect of these processes on seawater chemistry has been overlooked,' says Wortmann. (nsf.gov)
  • Space shuttle view of Earth's 'gypsum belt,' which likely changed seawater chemistry. (nsf.gov)
  • A SWAC system consists of a cold seawater supply pipe (intake), a pumping unit and heat exchanger (at the shoreline), and a closed loop with fresh water distribution to cover cooling needs of each building connected through a secondary heat exchanger. (slideshare.net)
  • The objective of this study was to determine the biodegradation of dispersant surfactants in cold seawater, relevant for deep sea or Arctic conditions. (sintef.no)
  • In an effort to better understand those cycles, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences David Johnston, Ph.D. student Andrew Masterson, and research assistant Erin Beirne worked with colleagues to develop a tool to measure levels of seawater sulfate in situ , giving researchers a clearer picture of how much sulfur cycling is taking place in oxygen minimum zones. (harvard.edu)
  • To make the discovery, the researchers combined past seawater sulfur composition data collected by Paytan with Wortmann's recent discovery of the strong link between marine sulfate concentrations and carbon and phosphorus cycling. (nsf.gov)
  • The study - ' The establishment of a marine focused biorefinery for bioethanol production using seawater and a novel marine yeast strain ' - has been published in Scientific Reports and was carried out by researchers at the University of Nottingham. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • The water that soaked out of these cores was noticeably saltier than anything you'd expect to find in seawater, and the researchers were compelled to ask why. (motherjones.com)
  • Lawrence Livermore scientists, in collaboration with researchers at Northeastern University, have developed carbon nanotube pores that can exclude salt from seawater. (beforeitsnews.com)
  • As most of the plants for seawater desalination are relying on reverse osmosis, and they are dumping all separated salts back into the seas, consequently the salinity of seas increased dramatically. (environmental-expert.com)
  • At typical salinity, it freezes at about −2 °C (28 °F). The coldest seawater ever recorded (in a liquid state) was in 2010, in a stream under an Antarctic glacier, and measured −2.6 °C (27.3 °F). Seawater pH is typically limited to a range between 7.5 and 8.4. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the vast majority of seawater has a salinity of between 31 g/kg and 38 g/kg, that is 3.1-3.8%, seawater is not uniformly saline throughout the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historically, several salinity scales were used to approximate the absolute salinity of seawater. (wikipedia.org)
  • The density of surface seawater ranges from about 1020 to 1029 kg/m3, depending on the temperature and salinity. (wikipedia.org)
  • At a temperature of 25 °C, salinity of 35 g/kg and 1 atm pressure, the density of seawater is 1023.6 kg/m3. (wikipedia.org)
  • The density of seawater also changes with salinity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The density of typical seawater brine of 120 g/kg salinity at 25 °C and atmospheric pressure is 1088 kg/m3. (wikipedia.org)
  • The speed of sound in seawater is about 1,500 m/s (whereas speed of sound is usually around 330 m/s in air at roughly 1000hPa pressure, 1 atmosphere), and varies with water temperature, salinity, and pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • The thermal conductivity of seawater is 0.6 W/mK at 25 °C and a salinity of 35 g/kg. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the adoption of the 1978 Practical Salinity Scale (PSS-78) and the 1980 International Equation of State of Seawater (EOS-80) about three decades ago, only slow scientific progress was made on understanding the thermophysical properties of IAPSO Standard Seawater , handling regional seawater composition anomalies, or characterizing the thermodynamic properties of seawater in contact with ice or humid air. (io-warnemuende.de)
  • It is based on a Gibbs function for seawater , that was first developed at the IOW 20 years ago, in combination with a redefinition of salinity in g/kg, and thermodynamic potentials for ice and humid air . (io-warnemuende.de)
  • Apparatus for seawater acidification including an ion exchange, cathode and anode electrode compartments and cation-permeable membranes that separate the electrode compartments from the ion exchange compartment. (rexresearch.com)
  • The high-rejection seawater membranes are commercially available and the system is fully upgradable from 600 to 2,200 GPD/2,271 to 8,328 LPD. (dometic.com)
  • The Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology Tuesday announced that it has developed the world s first next generation seawater distillation technology that allows consumable water to be produced in low temperatures and under low pressure, which increases energy efficiency and production capacity. (freerepublic.com)
  • This method wastes much less energy than earlier desalination techniques, such as heating seawater and harvesting fresh water from the steam. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Ocean desalination-a process that converts seawater into drinking water-is being hailed as the solution to water supply problems. (care2.com)
  • The water-splitting device lasts roughly 12 hours, unable to withstand seawater corrosion. (engadget.com)
  • Once the water is cleared of an acceptable level of impurities it is run through the highly technical "reverse osmosis" process to remove salt from the seawater. (breitbart.com)
  • From each two gallons of seawater, one gallon of drinking water and one gallon of highly concentrated salt water or "brine" is produced. (breitbart.com)
  • To add to the company's array of desalination solutions , Fluence's water experts have designed a family of pre-engineered building blocks that can be assembled into cost-effective seawater desalination systems that match any water sourcing need. (environmental-expert.com)
  • This process does not consume any energy while separating pure water from seawater. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Santa Barbara has completed a $71 million reactivation of its seawater desalination plant to bolster its water supplies. (scpr.org)
  • Today's methods are energy intensive and expensive because the magnesium concentration in seawater is so low that significant energy is needed to evaporate off water and precipitate magnesium chloride salt. (energy.gov)
  • The use of seawater for industrial cooling is a vital technology that poses some of the most profound environmental impact on the water quality in the Arabian Gulf. (scirp.org)
  • Will Turning Seawater Into Drinking Water Help Drought-Hit California? (npr.org)
  • This edition of the Industrial Bioprocessing TOE features trends and innovations in production of bioplastic for packaging applications and seawater fermentation process enabling to reduce water footprint in bioethanol production. (frost.com)
  • Seawater is water from a sea or ocean . (fact-index.com)
  • Corpus Christi was one of the first cities where seawater desalination feasibility studies were conducted by the water development board in 2002. (rgj.com)
  • In a statement, the water development board said the funding would help the city continue development conducting planning tasks related to seawater desalination, such as plant site selection, source water characterization, and economic impact and cost modeling. (rgj.com)
  • building a brackish water desalination plant is usually cheaper than a seawater desalination plant because brackish water is generally cleaner and contains less total dissolved salts. (rgj.com)
  • The state later created a water plan that included seawater desalination as a water management strategy. (rgj.com)
  • Seawater, or salt water, is water from a sea or ocean. (wikipedia.org)
  • Average density at the surface is 1.025 kg/L. Seawater is denser than both fresh water and pure water (density 1.0 kg/L at 4 °C (39 °F)) because the dissolved salts increase the mass by a larger proportion than the volume. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, although seawater contains about 2.8 times more bicarbonate than river water based on molarity, the percentage of bicarbonate in seawater as a ratio of all dissolved ions is far lower than in river water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bicarbonate ions also constitute 48% of river water solutes but only 0.14% of all seawater ions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Desalination plant means we are making freshwater from seawater and here, as you can see, we are in front of red sea water. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • So we need pressure to pressurise seawater much above 30 bars in order to get this fresh water from the other side. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • So we put waste water in one side of the membrane and on the other side we put our sea water, So according to what I explained, what will happen is the dirty water, which is the wastewater, will start moving towards the seawater but this membrane only allows clean water to pass. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • So if you have diluted seawater, which is something equivalent to brackish water, let's say, then the energy required for reverse osmosis is much, much, less. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • The technique involves pumping seawater (or allowing it to gravitate if below sea level) to an arid location and then subjecting it to two processes: first, it is used to humidify and cool the air, and second, it is evaporated by solar heating and distilled to produce fresh water. (wikipedia.org)
  • The technology was introduced by British inventor Charlie Paton in the early 1990s and is being developed by his UK company Seawater Greenhouse Ltd. The more concentrated salt water may either be further evaporated for the production of salt and other elements, or discharged back to the sea. (wikipedia.org)
  • The seawater greenhouse is a response to the global water crisis and peak water. (wikipedia.org)
  • The enterprise is now independently operating with an evolved set of technologies as Sundrop Farms Pty Ltd . A seawater greenhouse uses the sun, the sea and the atmosphere to produce fresh water and cool air. (wikipedia.org)
  • A seawater greenhouse evaporates much more water than it condenses back into freshwater. (wikipedia.org)
  • In particular, Sundrop Farms uses a more robust desalination technique in favour of the water vapour technique employed by Seawater Greenhouse, thus allowing them to construct larger scale facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jason Reese, Weir Professor of Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, and his research group say that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) - essentially sheets of one-atom thick carbon rolled into cylinders - can transform abundant seawater into pure, clean drinking water. (medindia.net)
  • A student from Ottawa University in Canada has developed a technology that turns seawater into clean, drinking water much more efficiently than is available today. (medindia.net)
  • The unique chemical properties of seawater mean that it is a drastically different living environment than fresh water, and many animals that live in it have never adapted to live in fresh water. (wisegeek.com)
  • Seawater is about 2.5% denser than fresh water. (wisegeek.com)
  • Desalination is the process of separating salt from seawater to produce fresh drinking water. (veolia.com)
  • This is done in one of two ways - thermal desalination (heating the seawater and condensing the vapour to produce fresh water) or reverse osmosis (pushing seawater through a membrane to separate salt and impurities from the fresh water). (veolia.com)
  • With the amount of rainfall expected to continue decreasing, and our population on the rise, seawater desalination, a completely non-rainfall dependent source of water, is being adopted as part of an integrated approach to managing water supply and demand. (veolia.com)
  • Further tests of the water's chemical composition only provided more evidence that this was not contemporary seawater: It was not only saltier, but also colder and more chlorinated-all features consistent with hypotheses regarding water quality during the LGM, according to Live Science . (motherjones.com)
  • Although 70% of our planet is covered with it, only 0.5% of our water needs are satisfied by desalinating seawater. (kcl.ac.uk)
  • Modi and Netanyahu had witnessed the demonstration of seawater purification technology pioneered by Israel at a water desalination unit on the Olga Beach during the Indian Prime Minister's visit to Israel. (ndtv.com)
  • These regions need to acquire new sources of water such as seawater and treated wastewater, depending on their geographic situations. (hitachi.com)
  • Seawater consists of a small quantity of salt dissolved in water. (orst.edu)
  • Ever since an unusually warm mass of seawater began spreading along the Pacific Coast of North America a year ago - wreaking havoc on the marine food chain - scientists have struggled to explain its presence. (latimes.com)
  • To counteract the overwhelmed oceans, scientists are proposing adding lime to seawater to boost the sink's efficiency. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Washington (AFP) - The US Navy believes it has finally worked out the solution to a problem that has intrigued scientists for decades: how to take seawater and use it as fuel. (rexresearch.com)
  • The overall process could be significantly less expensive and more efficient than any conventional magnesium extraction method available today and uses seawater as an abundant, free resource. (energy.gov)
  • The origin of the salts in seawater are both the land and salts that were present on the surface of the Earth when the oceans first formed, which could have been as soon as 100 million years after the Earth's formation. (wisegeek.com)
  • The plan involves the construction of large-scale seawater plants along the Mediterranean coast. (rockwellautomation.com)
  • When you and I walked shoeless along the Mediterranean shore, we drank seawater that was purified before our eyes using technology that will save untold lives. (ndtv.com)
  • What we've developed is an isotope tool - what we can do is measure the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater sulfate in these regions, and use that as a measurement to assess how much cycling is going on. (harvard.edu)
  • The temperature of the seawater around Antarctica is rising according to new research from the University of East Anglia. (eurekalert.org)
  • Chlorination of seawater has shown significant increase in total THMs (TTHMs) and in bromoform concentrations. (scirp.org)
  • To accurately analyze phytoplankton growth, the Vernet lab has nutrient technician Lindsey Ekern measure the concentrations of these nutrients from all seawater samples, which includes the experimental cultures in the light van, CTD casts, trace-metal-clean Niskin casts, towfish deployments, and samples collected by the ROV. (mbari.org)
  • Sundrop Farms CEO Philipp Saumweber, a former investment banker, says the agriculture model as "innovative" in that it harnesses only seawater and sunlight. (greenprophet.com)
  • The seawater greenhouse technology was adopted and subsequently modified by Sundrop Farms in Port Augusta, Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Seawater is heated in a thermal process, flashed into steam in a series of evaporation chambers and then condensed. (outokumpu.com)
  • The AQUA-CSP study analyses the potential of concentrating solar thermal power technology for seawater desalination in the Middle East and North Africa. (dlr.de)
  • For technical data and manufacturing plants analysis, the report analyzes Seawater Desalination Membrane leading suppliers on capacity, commercial production date, manufacturing plants distribution, R&D Status, technology sources, and raw materials sources. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • The predicted cost of jet fuel using the technology is in the range of three to six dollars per gallon, say experts at the US Naval Research Laboratory, who have already flown a model airplane with fuel produced from seawater. (rexresearch.com)
  • For the first time we've been able to develop a technology to get CO2 and hydrogen from seawater simultaneously, that's a big breakthrough," she said, adding that the fuel "doesn't look or smell very different. (rexresearch.com)
  • Developing a game-changing technology like this, seawater to fuel, really is something that reinvents a lot of the way we can do business when you think about logistics, readiness. (rexresearch.com)
  • To resolve these challenges, Hitachi is using information technology to deskill plant operation and is improving its design techniques for seawater desalination plants. (hitachi.com)
  • Surprisingly, the spectrum for the seawater-contacted polymer fibers was distinctly different from what was expected based on small molecule and computational investigations. (ornl.gov)
  • Fritz Haber, the German scientist known for his invention of the Haber process and Zyklon poison gas, spent the last years of his life attempting to come up with an efficient way of extracting large quantities of gold from seawater so that Germany could pay off its war debts. (wisegeek.com)
  • The new plant takes in seawater through a 72-inch pipeline to the tune of 100 million gallons a day. (breitbart.com)
  • Part of that research included lab tests on machines that suck up seawater and spray it into the air, seeding white clouds that reflect rays of sunlight away from Earth. (inhabitat.com)
  • In South Australia, sunlight + seawater = tomatoes. (technologyreview.com)
  • Japan used seawater to cool nuclear fuel at the stricken Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant after the tsunami in March 2011 -- and that was probably the best action to take at the time, says Professor Alexandra Navrotsky of the University of California, Davis. (eponline.com)
  • The latest "German" Submarines before the end of the war were using seawater and peroxide as fuel, and were as efficient as if not more than nuclear according to Vladamir Terzisky, the Bulgarian born Engineer. (rexresearch.com)
  • Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a radically new process to produce magnesium from seawater. (energy.gov)
  • If successful, PNNL would enable a low-cost, low-energy metal-organic process for producing magnesium from seawater without the energy intensive steps associated with conventional processes. (energy.gov)
  • Seawater represents a virtually unlimited source of magnesium, which could supply worldwide demand for centuries given an economic and environmentally sound method for its extraction. (energy.gov)
  • For the first time since the first international oceanographic standard of 1902, TEOS-10 provides tools for the analysis of seawater composition anomalies, such as those in the Baltic See or in the deep Pacific. (io-warnemuende.de)
  • The seawater greenhouse concept was first researched and developed in 1991 by Charlie Paton's company Light Works Ltd, now Seawater Greenhouse Ltd. The first pilot project commenced in 1992 with the search for a test site that was eventually found on the Canary Island of Tenerife. (wikipedia.org)
  • Internal documents obtained by The Associated Press show that seawater has entered the engine compartment of the tanker, which hasn't been maintained for over five years, causing damage to the pipelines and increasing the risk of sinking. (ap.org)
  • Means is provided for feeding seawater through the ion exchange compartment and for feeding a dissociable liquid media through the anode and cathode electrode compartments. (rexresearch.com)