Loading...
  • Saccadic
  • The combination of serial and parallel pathways in the saccadic system has led to two extreme hypotheses for the generation of anti-saccades. (jneurosci.org)
  • The inability to see your own saccadic eye movements is a simple yet powerful demonstration of saccadic suppression: You generally do not perceive events that occur while your eyes are moving, including (tautologically) your own saccades. (peerj.com)
  • O'Regan & NoĆ«, 2001 ), and here we use saccadic suppression as an umbrella term for various findings that show that vision is impaired around the time of saccades. (peerj.com)
  • cues
  • In addition, monkeys with unilateral lesions exhibited specific impairment only in the performance of memory-guided saccades directed toward visual cues in the visual field contralateral to the lesioned hemisphere. (frontiersin.org)
  • cognitive
  • To characterize the saccades in patients with Norrbottnian GD3 with respect to their neurological and cognitive status using a computer-based eye-tracking technique. (frontiersin.org)
  • signals
  • Because the attenuated pre-saccade activity that we found in the SC may be insufficient by itself to elicit correct anti-saccades, additional movement signals from other brain areas are presumably required. (jneurosci.org)
  • consistent
  • They are also consistent with the robust deficits in antisaccade performance frequently observed in disease states associated with PFC dysfunction. (jneurosci.org)
  • results
  • Phrased differently, the retinal-image motion that results from saccades is suppressed, at least in the sense that it is not consciously perceived. (peerj.com)
  • Preparation
  • Whether allocation of visuospatial attention can be divorced from saccade preparation has been the subject of intense research efforts. (jneurosci.org)
  • Thus, the relationship between visuospatial attention and saccade preparation remains unresolved. (jneurosci.org)
  • toward
  • This "anti-saccade" test shows if the brain is able to engage the planning centers of the prefrontal cortex to overcome the impulse to look toward the light rather than away from it, the researcher explained. (psychcentral.com)