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  • proteins
  • Long stretches of DNA once considered inert "dark matter" of the genome - the over 98% of DNA that doesn't code for proteins - appear to be uniquely active in a part of the brain known to control the body's 24-hour cycle, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health . (highlighthealth.com)
  • Induced ncRNAs allosterically modify RNA-binding proteins in cis to inhibit transcription," Nature , vol. 454, no. 7200, pp. 126-130, 2008. (hindawi.com)
  • Evidence is mounting that MORT acts as a regulator of protein translation through interactions with RNA binding proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • The transcription of DNA into RNA and subsequent translation into proteins determines the form and function of all living things. (wikipedia.org)
  • chromosome
  • Telomerase is a fascinating biochemical system because a large DNA-protein complex (the chromosome end) must interact productively with an RNA-protein complex (telomerase). (hhmi.org)
  • cellular
  • Our lab's early work on catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) helped to establish that RNA is not restricted to being a passive carrier of genetic information, but can have an active role in cellular metabolism. (hhmi.org)
  • arbitrary
  • 200 bases, as an arbitrary cutoff) of RNA that don't seem to be associated with any particular gene, but are nonetheless transcribed and turned loose to float around. (sciencemag.org)
  • describing the same
  • I would very much want to avoid having to bring order to even a small part of the literature in this area - there are so many reports, some of them describing the same RNA with different names, and some of them describing, no doubt, slightly different ones with the same name. (sciencemag.org)
  • cell
  • RNA in situ hybridization using 33P-labeled riboprobes was used to identify the cell types that expressed Pod-1 in the developing kidney and other tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • short
  • They don't seem to be translated into protein, but even that is the subject of argument, with some groups saying that there are so-called noncoding RNAs that have been misannotated, and other proposals that they're somehow translated into short-lived peptides that are difficult to detect. (sciencemag.org)
  • Examples of decreasing the levels of oncogenic long noncoding RNAs via silencing with short interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, or low molecular-weight inhibitors are also described. (springer.com)
  • protein
  • The cleaved RNAs are then loaded onto a Piwi family protein to aid in the cleavage of complementary based RNA, a reaction known as the "ping-pong cycle. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In molecular biology, ghrelin opposite strand (non-protein coding), also known as GHRLOS, is a long non-coding RNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • The protein consists of four conserved domains (RNA-Binding Domain (TRBD), fingers, palm and thumb), organized into a ring configuration that shares common features with retroviral reverse transcriptases, viral RNA polymerases and bacteriophage B-family DNA polymerases. (wikipedia.org)
  • The L RNA encodes the L protein, which functions as the viral transcriptase/replicase. (wikipedia.org)
  • These domains are important in Dicer activity regulation, dsRNA processing, and RNA interference protein factor functioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene expression
  • In the study, Wahlestedt and his colleagues used a synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA) - which can inhibit gene expression - to decrease BACE1-AS expression in animal models and reduce amyloid generation successfully. (scripps.edu)
  • Small RNAs (sRNAs) are essential regulators of eukaryotic gene expression and function. (frontiersin.org)
  • Epigenetics refers to the study of long-term changes in gene expression, which may or may not be heritable, which are not caused by changes to the DNA sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • eukaryotic
  • The nonlinear correlation for eukaryotes, although claim of its existence contrasts the previous view that no correlation exists for this group of organisms, reflects disproportionately fast increasing noncoding DNA in increasingly large eukaryotic genomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzyme
  • Dicer was given its name in 2001 by Emily Bernstein, a graduate student in Greg Hannon's lab at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, who sought to discover the enzyme responsible for generating small RNA fragments from double-stranded RNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dicer's ability to generate ~22 nucleotide RNA fragments was discovered by separating it from the RISC enzyme complex after initiating the RNAi pathway with dsRNA transfection. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • What makes it so dangerous is that even initial small changes in BACE1 activity may snowball to a long-lasting and chronic process of amyloid-β 1-42 accumulation in the brain. (scripps.edu)
  • Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) in plants have important roles in regulating biological processes, including development, reproduction, and stress responses. (frontiersin.org)
  • The host counteracts this deleterious effect through various pathways, including Piwi-interacting small RNAs (piRNAs). (biomedcentral.com)
  • This family was identified in Shotgun sequencing approach of full-length cDNA libraries from small RNAs from Dictyostelium discoideum. (wikipedia.org)
  • The possibility of using Small Interfering RNAs, or siRNAs, to target the miRNAs mentioned above has been discussed, but there are currently no known methods to do so. (wikipedia.org)
  • transcripts
  • Recent technological breakthroughs suggest that systemic administration of modified siRNAs, which cross the blood-brain barrier, could in fact target RNA transcripts there. (scripps.edu)
  • enzymes
  • Subsequent experiments testing RNase III family enzymes abilities to create RNA fragments narrowed the search to Drosophila CG4792, now named Dicer. (wikipedia.org)
  • target
  • A target-specific probe, composed of 20 oligonucleotide pairs, hybridizes to the target RNA(s). (wikipedia.org)
  • structure
  • The RNA structure of HAR1A has been shown to be stable, with a secondary structure unlike those previously described. (wikipedia.org)
  • messenger
  • The new study's findings show that when BACE1-AS (pronounced base) is exposed to stress, it stabilizes BACE1 messenger RNA, increasing expression of BACE1 and leading to higher levels of amyloid-β 1-42, the peptide believed to be the primary cause of Alzheimer's disease. (scripps.edu)
  • form
  • JUPITER, FL, June 26, 2008-Scientists from Scripps Florida, a division of The Scripps Research Institute, have shown for the first time that a specialized form of RNA is directly linked to increased levels of amyloid plaque in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. (scripps.edu)