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  • siRNA
  • Unlike small interfering RNA (siRNA) therapeutics that turn over within a cell and consequently only silence genes transiently, DNA constructs are continually transcribed, replenishing the cellular 'dose' of shRNA, thereby enabling long-term silencing of targeted genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • viral
  • Multi-cassette constructs that target multiple sites within the same viral RNA circumvent this issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • machinery
  • Inside the cell, the DNA is transported to the nucleus where transcription machinery continually manufactures the encoded RNAs. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecules
  • On Monday, Andrew Fire from Stanford University in California and Craig Mello from the University of Massachusetts in Worcester won their laurels for working out how to use double-stranded RNA molecules to control the flow of genetic information. (newscientist.com)
  • Virtually all animals and plants utilize small RNA molecules to control protein expression during different developmental stages and in response to viral infection. (nih.gov)
  • cell's
  • But CRISPR interference acts one step earlier in the cell's protein manufacturing process, said Jonathan Weissman, Ph.D., a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator and a UCSF professor of cellular and molecular pharmacology, who is another senior author on the work. (genengnews.com)
  • inhibitory
  • Delivery of inhibitory RNAs to target tissues needs to be safe, efficient, and for many diseases, long-lasting, in order to exploit this endogenous mechanism for therapeutic purposes. (omicsonline.org)
  • Scientists
  • Building upon their initial worm work, the two scientists then slowly pieced together the molecular machinery behind this "RNA-interference" process, revealing as they did so what looks set to become one of the most powerful instruments in the molecular biologist's toolkit. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • technique
  • This discovery has quickly resulted in the widespread use of artificial interfering RNAs as an important laboratory research technique for altering the amount of specific proteins inside cells. (wikiversity.org)
  • RNA interference is now a widely used biology research technique that can be applied to both cultured cells and whole animals . (wikiversity.org)
  • RNA interference can be employed as a metabolic engineering technique for synthesis and production of economically important plant products, including alkaloid productions (such as scopolamine, quinine, codeine, vincristine), flavoring agents, and essential oil biosynthesis. (news-medical.net)
  • bind
  • The two dsRBPs bind a 16 base pair stretch of the RNA simultaneously on two sides of the helix. (nih.gov)
  • Rossi
  • They were the first to really describe the fact that this was a double-stranded RNA mediated phenomenon," says John Rossi of Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, California. (newscientist.com)
  • genome
  • The selected RNA serves as an adaptor that determines the target anywhere within the genome. (genengnews.com)
  • Applications
  • There is also active study of the potential value of RNA interference for medical applications . (wikiversity.org)
  • As with all patent applications, the company must demonstrate that its RNA interference technology has utility, is adequately described in the specification of the patent application, and is both novel and nonobvious. (law360.com)
  • known
  • This was a useful experimental system because the developmental orgin of all of this organism's cells is known and it is possible to inject RNA into early embryos and observe changes in the pattern of development. (wikiversity.org)
  • Known structures of RNA silencing factors are represented with same coloring throughout the article, while unknown structures are shown as 3D shapes. (nih.gov)
  • Historically, RNA interference was known by other names, including post transcriptional gene silencing, and quelling. (phys.org)
  • medicine
  • In 2006, Andrew Fire and Craig C. Mello shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work on RNA interference in the nematode worm C. elegans , which they published in 1998. (phys.org)