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  • lung
  • In the first 4 months of life, foals must be protected from potentially serious damage to the lung caused by inhalation of the Rhodococcus equi bacteria. (gov.on.ca)
  • thus
  • To prevent Rhodococcus equi infections, foals should thus ideally be born in January (when the organism remains frozen in the ground). (gov.on.ca)
  • ability
  • The purpose of this study was to perform a genome-wide bioinformatic analysis of key genes encoding metabolism of diverse storage compounds by Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and to examine its ability to synthesize and accumulate triacylglycerols (TAG), wax esters, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), glycogen and polyphosphate (PolyP). (biomedcentral.com)
  • The ability of the organism to multiply in foals, but not in adult horses is likely another reason why horse breeding farms may become progressively infected with Rhodococcus equi. (gov.on.ca)
  • equi
  • A vaccine for Rhodococcus equi , the common bacteria that affects foals, often causing severe infections, pneumonia, and sometimes death, is in the final stages of development. (bloodhorse.com)
  • We've all been working towards immunization against Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals, since this is the best way to control the infection,' said John F. Prescott, MA, VetMB, PhD, professor in the department of pathobiology at the University of Guelph's Ontario Veterinary College. (bloodhorse.com)
  • While this organism is generally known as Rhodococcus equi, there has been taxonomic debate since the 1980s about whether this name is the valid name, with Rhodococcus hoagii and Prescottella equi both proposed as official alternative names. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacterial examples include: Bartonella henselae Francisella tularensis Listeria monocytogenes Salmonella Typhi Brucella Legionella Mycobacterium Nocardia Rhodococcus equi Yersinia Neisseria meningitidis Fungal examples include: Histoplasma capsulatum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strains
  • Fully sequenced in October 2006, the genome is known to be 9.7 megabasepairs long and 67% G/C. Strains of Rhodococcus are important owing to their ability to catabolize a wide range of compounds and produce bioactive steroids, acrylamide, and acrylic acid, and their involvement in fossil fuel biodesulfurization. (wikipedia.org)
  • While studies on the biodegradation of nitrile pollutants focus on the screening and discovery of strains, the industrial application of these enzymes as biocatalysts focuses on engineering combined with immobilization of both Rhodococcus cells and enzymes to improve their performance under the adverse conditions in the catalytic process. (springer.com)
  • bioremediation
  • Rhodococcus has been greatly researched as a potential agent for the bioremediation of pollutants as it is commonly found in the natural environment, and they possess certain characteristics that allow them to thrive under a variety of conditions, and they have the capability to metabolize many hydrocarbons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently developed optimization procedures for their biosynthesis and recovery would broaden potential applications of Rhodococcus biosurfactants in new advanced technologies, such as environmental bioremediation, improved material construction, and biomedicine. (springer.com)
  • toluene
  • Another important application of Rhodococcus comes from bioconversion, using biological systems to convert cheap starting material into more valuable compounds, such as its ability to metabolize harmful environmental pollutants, including toluene, naphthalene, herbicides, and PCBs. (wikipedia.org)
  • focuses
  • The present chapter summarizes recent research on Rhodococcus biosurfactants and focuses on biosynthesis features, physicochemical and bioactive properties, and their potential applications. (springer.com)