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  • Dose Aspirin
  • In the United States low dose aspirin is deemed reasonable in those between 50 and 70 years old who have a more than 10% risk of cardiovascular disease and are not at an increased risk of bleeding who are otherwise healthy. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacteria
  • Much of what is known about the bacteria that cause rheumatic fever is from work done by Dr. Rebecca Craighill Lancefield of the Rockefeller Institute. (faqs.org)
  • rash
  • The most common symptoms include a fever that lasts for more than five days not affected by usual medications, large lymph nodes in the neck, a rash in the genital area, and red eyes, lips, palms or soles of the feet. (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation of the joints
  • What results may be a fever, inflammation of the joints (sometimes incorrectly called " growing pains"), and Sydenham's chorea--uncontrollable, spastic movements (traditionally called St. Vitus' Dance) caused by the immune system disorder's affect on the nervous system. (faqs.org)
  • headache
  • Aspirin, either by itself or in a combined formulation, effectively treats certain types of a headache, but its efficacy may be questionable for others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirin or other over-the-counter analgesics are widely recognized as effective for the treatment of tension headache. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] This combination is used for the relief of pain such as headache, toothache, menstrual discomfort, pain and fever associated with colds and flu, and for postoperative and rheumatic pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • medications
  • Aspirin is one of the most widely used medications globally, with an estimated 40,000 tonnes (44,000 tons) (50 to 120 billion pills) consumed each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Specific inflammatory conditions in which aspirin is used include Kawasaki disease, pericarditis, and rheumatic fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later, during the convalescent or the subacute phase, desquamation of the fingers and toes usually begins in the periungual region within two to three weeks after the onset of fever and may extend to include the palms and soles. (wikipedia.org)
  • valvular
  • In the older generation and in much of the less-developed world, valvular disease (including mitral valve prolapse, reinfection in the form of valvular endocarditis, and valve rupture) from undertreated rheumatic fever continues to be a problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • pain
  • For pain or fever, effects typically begin within 30 minutes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Topical aspirin may be effective for treating some types of neuropathic pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like its ability to control pain, aspirin's ability to control fever is due to its action on the prostaglandin system through its irreversible inhibition of COX. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirin is believed to act against fever, pain, and inflammation by interfering with the synthesis of specific prostaglandins in the body. (infoplease.com)
  • A 'strep throat' often starts suddenly with throat pain and fever and without signs of a cold. (ne.jp)
  • Rectal aspirin is given as a suppository to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. (adventisthealthcare.com)
  • Saridon was first launched by Roche in 1933, initially containing pyrithyldione and phenacetin, widely used remedies for fever and pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapies worked on: Amebiasis Insomnia Tetanus Rheumatic Fever Dextrose Phleboclysis Conjunctivitis Fresh Accidental Wounds Ersipelas Furunculosis Fever Regimen Barbiturate Poisoning Mycoses Anthrax Carbuncles Eczema Burns Glaucoma Chanoroid Bubo Bedsores Pain Ulcer Uncinariasis Trichiniasias Varicose Veins Acne Acne Rosacaea Arterial Thrombosis of the Extremities Eclampsia Throughout his career, Fantus became acutely aware of the importance of having access to blood for transfusions and the lack of accessibility that existed at the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chest pain is often pleuritic in nature (associated with respiration) which is aggravated when lying down and relieved on sitting forward, sometimes, accompanied by fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typhoid
  • Tetracycline, Chlortetracycline (Aureomycin), Choramphenicol (Chloromycetin) - which became standard treatment for Typhoid (Enteric Fever) and Erythromycin, all came in the latter part of the 1950s. (island.lk)
  • The bilberry has been historically used as a remedy for a range of conditions from kidney stones to typhoid fever as well as amenorrhea. (theherbpeddler.com)
  • chronic
  • Information gained during recent epidemics suggests that chikungunya fever may result in a chronic phase as well as the phase of acute illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • onset
  • Later, during the convalescent or the subacute phase, desquamation of the fingers and toes usually begins in the periungual region within two to three weeks after the onset of fever and may extend to include the palms and soles. (wikipedia.org)
  • epidemic
  • He was medical superintendent at Dundee Royal Infirmary from 1864 to 1866, during which time he had to cope with a major fever epidemic and became noted for pioneering the clinical use of thermometers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kawasaki
  • Children with fever and neck adenitis who do not respond to antibiotics should have Kawasaki disease considered as part of the differential diagnoses. (wikipedia.org)
  • unclear
  • There is some evidence that aspirin is effective at preventing colorectal cancer, though the mechanisms of this effect are unclear. (wikipedia.org)
  • antibiotics
  • The recurrence of rheumatic fever is relatively common in the absence of maintenance of low dose antibiotics, especially during the first three to five years after the first episode. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • A precursor to aspirin in the form of leaves from the willow tree has been used for its health effects for at least 2,400 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pain
  • Indigenous people have also used Devil's Claw for fever, as a blood purifier, and to ease the pain of childbirth. (smart-publications.com)
  • Therapies worked on: Amebiasis Insomnia Tetanus Rheumatic Fever Dextrose Phleboclysis Conjunctivitis Fresh Accidental Wounds Ersipelas Furunculosis Fever Regimen Barbiturate Poisoning Mycoses Anthrax Carbuncles Eczema Burns Glaucoma Chanoroid Bubo Bedsores Pain Ulcer Uncinariasis Trichiniasias Varicose Veins Acne Acne Rosacaea Arterial Thrombosis of the Extremities Eclampsia Throughout his career, Fantus became acutely aware of the importance of having access to blood for transfusions and the lack of accessibility that existed at the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Topical aspirin may be effective for treating some types of neuropathic pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like its ability to control pain, aspirin's ability to control fever is due to its action on the prostaglandin system through its irreversible inhibition of COX. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chest pain is often pleuritic in nature (associated with respiration) which is aggravated when lying down and relieved on sitting forward, sometimes, accompanied by fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mild
  • This illness was called 'Valley Fever,' was common, and was considered to be a mild local condition. (army.mil)
  • risk
  • In the United States low dose aspirin is deemed reasonable in those between 50 and 70 years old who have a more than 10% risk of cardiovascular disease and are not at an increased risk of bleeding who are otherwise healthy. (wikipedia.org)