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  • viscosity
  • In rheology, the Farris Effect describes the decrease of the viscosity of a suspension upon increasing the dispersity of the solid additive, at constant volume fraction of the solid additive. (wikipedia.org)
  • plasticity
  • Rheology unites the seemingly unrelated fields of plasticity and non-Newtonian fluid dynamics by recognizing that materials undergoing these types of deformation are unable to support a stress (particularly a shear stress, since it is easier to analyze shear deformation) in static equilibrium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rheology unites the seemingly unrelated fields of plasticity and non-Newtonian fluids by recognizing that both these types of materials are unable to support a shear stress in static equilibrium . (thefullwiki.org)
  • behavior
  • Rheology generally accounts for the behavior of non-Newtonian fluids, by characterizing the minimum number of functions that are needed to relate stresses with rate of change of strain or strain rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • characteristics
  • As well as research, we can offer consultancy, industrial theory and practical training measuring the rheology characteristics of a range of products. (dmu.ac.uk)
  • dynamics
  • There is a large body of literature on food rheology because the study of food rheology entails unique factors beyond an understanding of the basic rheological dynamics of the flow and deformation of matter. (wikipedia.org)
  • For this reason, examples of food rheology are didactically useful to explain the dynamics of other materials we are less familiar with. (wikipedia.org)
  • flow
  • Much of theoretical rheology is concerned with associating external forces and torques with internal stresses and internal strain gradients and flow velocities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rheology is the science of the flow of matter. (sgs.com)
  • Contact SGS today to find out more about our rheology and slurry flow services. (sgs.com)
  • Dies for rheology are used in melt flow instruments and capillary rheometers. (instron.us)
  • materials
  • There are different sorts of stress [ 4 ] and materials can respond in various ways, so much of theoretical rheology is concerned with forces and stresses. (thefullwiki.org)
  • below
  • A small amount of rheology may be given during the first degree, but the professional will extend this knowledge during postgraduate research or by attending short courses and by joining one of the professional associations (see below). (thefullwiki.org)
  • structure
  • In contrast, there is far less knowledge about sensory-emulsion structure relationships, but the development of rheology-sensory relationships can be the first step in building understanding about how sensory attributes are infl uenced by changing the emulsion structure. (cosmeticsandtoiletries.com)
  • relationships
  • One of the major tasks of rheology is to empirically establish the relationships between deformations (or rates of deformation) and stresses, by adequate measurements, although a number of theoretical developments (such as assuring frame invariants) are also required before using the empirical data. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the tasks of rheology is to empirically establish the relationships between deformations and stresses, respectively their derivatives by adequate measurements. (thefullwiki.org)