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  • acute respiratory
  • During the RSV season (November-May), health-care providers should consider RSV as a cause of acute respiratory disease in both children and adults. (cdc.gov)
  • A study of children age 7 and younger coming to Children's Emergency Department with acute respiratory illnesses found that those infected with RSV had more than twice as many emergency department visits and six times more hospitalizations than those with seasonal flu. (childrenshospital.org)
  • viral
  • Three proteins are associated with the nucleocaspid and include nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), and polymerase or large protein (L). The other five viral proteins are contained within the virus envelope and include nonglycosylated matrix protein (M), M2, fusion protein (F), glycoprotein (G), and short hydrophobic protein (SH). (msdsonline.com)
  • The calves vaccinated with the pre-F protein had high levels of neutralizing antibodies (more than 100-fold higher than those that received the post-F protein), and four of five were protected from RSV viral replication in the upper and lower respiratory tracts. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Fresh ginger (Zingiber officinale) has anti-viral activity against human respiratory syncytial virus in human respiratory tract cell lines. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Respiratory and Enteric Viruses Br, Div of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC. (cdc.gov)
  • secretions
  • RSV is spread from respiratory secretions through close contact with infected persons or contact with contaminated surfaces or objects. (integrisok.com)
  • In addition to a complete medical history and physical examination of your child, a test (nasal swab or nasal wash) of the baby's respiratory secretions may show the presence of a virus. (integrisok.com)
  • cough
  • Lower respiratory tract involvement is indicated by the onset of expiratory wheezing or inspiratory sounds, marked cough, tachypnea (rapid breathing) and retractions (heavy breathing), and varying degrees of cyanosis (bluish/purple color of the skin). (healthcentral.com)
  • specimens
  • These tests may be performed on upper and lower respiratory specimens. (cdc.gov)
  • Laboratories report weekly to CDC the number of specimens tested for RSV by antigen-detection and/or virus-isolation methods and the number of positive results. (cdc.gov)
  • Prevention
  • RSV is a winter virus in the northern hemisphere, November through April, so now is the time to be vigilant about prevention. (sheknows.com)
  • nose
  • Touching an object or surface contaminated with the virus and then touching your nose, eyes, or mouth without first washing your hands. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • The virus can live on surfaces, such as countertops, desks, phones and computer keyboards, so if you touch these items and then rub your eyes, or touch your nose or mouth, you may become infected. (sheknows.com)
  • The virus spreads through tiny droplets that go into the air when a sick person blows their nose, coughs, or sneezes. (umm.edu)
  • You touch your nose, eyes, or mouth after you have touched something contaminated by the virus, such as a toy or doorknob. (umm.edu)
  • surveillance
  • RSV activity in the United States is monitored by the National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS), a voluntary, laboratory-based system. (cdc.gov)
  • Reported by: National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System collaborating laboratories. (cdc.gov)
  • persons
  • Infected persons shed the virus for up to 27 days, a period that carries with it substantial potential for nosocomial (a new disorder, unrelated to the patient's primary condition, associated with being treated in a hospital) spread. (healthcentral.com)