• Neural control of respiration (like neural control of many other physiological functions, micturition, for example) is highly complex and not fully elucidated. (merlot.org)
  • Control of ventilation ( control of respiration ) refers to the physiological mechanisms involved in the control of physiologic ventilation. (bionity.com)
  • Thus the control of respiration is centered primarily on how well this is achieved by the lungs . (bionity.com)
  • Drugs can greatly influence the control of respiration. (bionity.com)
  • These molecules, including the enzymes involved in respiration, are in contact with soil particles. (inra.fr)
  • The only things needed to form an Exomet are the death of microorganisms and the stabilisation by molecules of respiration enzymes, so it's very likely that the phenomenon is widespread in nature! (inra.fr)
  • Respiration, not to be confused with breathing, is any process by which a cell releases energy from the chemical bonds of complex molecules, such as glucose. (ehow.co.uk)
  • The reactions involved in respiration are catabolic reactions , which break large molecules into smaller ones, releasing energy in the process, as weak so-called "high-energy" bonds are replaced by stronger bonds in the products. (wikipedia.org)
  • In other situations, bacteria use one or more different molecules as a final electron acceptor for respiration. (livestrong.com)
  • The purpose of respiration is to provide the cell with the appropriate molecules for creating energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate, ATP. (livestrong.com)
  • Soil particles play a major role in protecting enzymes from respiration. (inra.fr)
  • We observed this kind of extracellular respiration in every type of soil we tested. (inra.fr)
  • Although we cannot make any generalisations for the moment, it appears that the texture and pH of a soil affect the intensity of the Exomet: the finer the soil particles, the more the enzymes appear to be stabilised by absorption, and the better the extracellular respiration. (inra.fr)
  • Here we show that historical rainfall controls soil respiration responses to current moisture. (pnas.org)
  • This finding was robust, with historical climate repeatedly limiting current respiration regardless of alterations to soil moisture, rainfall, or the arrival of new taxa. (pnas.org)
  • We focus on respiration responses to soil moisture, which remain unresolved in ecosystem models. (pnas.org)
  • Here, we show that soil respiration is constrained by historical climate. (pnas.org)
  • Historical contingencies are supported by observed spatial variation in the temperature sensitivity of soil microbial respiration, decomposition, and C use efficiency across boreal to tropical sites ( 3 , 4 ), albeit with no indication of mechanism. (pnas.org)
  • A global database of soil respiration dat. (mendeley.com)
  • Soil respiration (Rs) is an important source of CO2 to the atmosphere, yet understanding the processes controlling the combined autotrophic and heterotrophic components has proven challenging. (environmental-expert.com)
  • What Is Bacterial Respiration? (livestrong.com)
  • context":"http:\/\/schema.org","@type":"NewsArticle","headline":"What Is Bacterial Respiration? (livestrong.com)
  • Handbook of Physiology (Sec. 3, Respiration, Vol. 2). (springer.com)
  • Analysis of respiration-incompetent yeast with specific deletions in the electron transport chain and the machinery of mitochondrial ATP synthesis indicated that the ability to respire is critical for Bax toxicity. (sciencemag.org)
  • In which Hank does some push ups for science and describes the "economy" of cellular respiration and the various processes whereby our bodies create energy in the form of ATP. (youtube.com)
  • Respiration is the utilization of energy within the plant and results in the release of oxygen back into the atmosphere. (ehow.com)
  • Conversely, heterotrophs use respiration to yield energy from the food that they consume. (ehow.com)
  • What is the energy from respiration used for? (reference.com)
  • The energy from respiration is used to utilize stored energy within an organism's body when necessary. (reference.com)
  • All animals use biochemical respiration to deliver oxygen across the cell wall, and they use the gas to acquire energy. (reference.com)
  • Aerobic respiration is the release of energy from glucose or another organic substrate in the presence of Oxygen. (mixbook.com)
  • The term is sometimes (inaccurately) used to refer to labored, gasping breathing patterns accompanying organ failure (e.g. liver failure and renal failure), SIRS, septic shock, and metabolic acidosis (see Kussmaul breathing, or in general any labored breathing, including Biot's respirations and ataxic respirations). (wikipedia.org)
  • The physiological processes that lead to the development of Cheyne-Stokes respiration, which involves the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and sympathetic nervous systems, are not fully understood. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Physiological respiration is also known as ventilation and breathing, and it involves inhalation and exhalation processes. (reference.com)
  • A respiration assistor (10) for use in an anaesthesia breathing system. (google.com)
  • It consists of cycles of breathing, which become increasingly deeper, followed by periods where respiration becomes gradually shallower. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Animal respiration: walrus, frog, and butt-breathing turtle. (slate.com)
  • Respiration is taking a breath or the act of breathing. (yourdictionary.com)
  • In air-breathing vertebrates, respiration takes place in the lungs. (yourdictionary.com)
  • If you tell the patient/client that you're going to count their respirations, wouldn't they be tempted to control their breathing pattern? (allnurses.com)
  • You'll also consider how respiration disorders occur and the rational basis for treatment for these disorders. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Cheyne-Stokes respiration can occur in people with neurological conditions, or congestive heart failure. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This might occur if you're pushing your limits during an aerobic activity, like spinning or a cardio workout, and the oxygen supply to your muscles is insufficient to maintain aerobic-only respiration. (livestrong.com)
  • Unit 4: Respiration, circulation and excretion Sistema digestivo Glándulas digestivas Tracto digestivo Sistema respiratorio Alvéolos Bronquios Bronquiolos Capilares Dióxido de carbono Laringe Pulmones Faringe Tráquea Sistema circulatorio Arterias Vasos. (calameo.com)
  • Look up respiration or respire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Respiration is sometimes called BIOLOGICAL OXIDATION and thus may be compared to BURNING. (angelfire.com)