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  • system that targets
  • The findings reveal that C2c2-the first naturally-occurring CRISPR system that targets only RNA to have been identified, discovered by this collaborative group in October 2015 -helps protect bacteria against viral infection. (broadinstitute.org)
  • molecular
  • Previous wetlab experience in molecular microbiology, CRISPR or bacteriophages is an advantage. (researchschool.nl)
  • Ellen Jorgensen , a molecular biologist and science communicator whose latest project is the yet-to-launch Biotech Without Borders, said she thinks it's important to focus on the potential of CRISPR, rather than feed into the "hysteria" that can surround such life-altering scientific technologies. (cbsnews.com)
  • genetically
  • A scientist says he created the first genetically edited babies using CRISPR to protect them from HIV infection. (npr.org)
  • The summit was organized try to reach a global consensus on whether and how it would be ethical to create genetically modified human beings with CRISPR. (npr.org)
  • As approvals for field testing and commercialization have been limited in most crops, researcher Yuriko Osakabe from Tokushima University in Japan and colleagues explore genome editing to genetically improve apple and grapevine. (isaaa.org)
  • tool
  • While CRISPR is a useful tool, it can only be used to create loss-of-function modifications and often causes off-target effects due to the disruptive mechanism by which it works. (cancer.gov)
  • The team that first unveiled the rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive CRISPR-based diagnostic tool called SHERLOCK has greatly enhanced the tool's power, and has developed a miniature paper test that allows results to be seen with the naked eye - without the need for expensive equipment. (mit.edu)
  • That is something that is going to stay with us with CRISPR or any other tool we develop that cuts DNA. (whatisepigenetics.com)
  • Coral reefs on the precipice of collapse may get a conservation boost from the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators. (eurekalert.org)
  • This isn't surprising since CRISPR is considered the most effective and efficient gene-editing tool available. (talfeed.com)
  • It is important to identify and understand potential off-target effects of CRISPR-based DNA cleavage because this process has become a ubiquitous tool in research and is under intense development to produce potentially clinically relevant interventions. (technologynetworks.com)
  • Precise
  • Last year, Marson and Schumann successfully used CRISPR to perform precise DNA sequence replacements in primary human T cells for the first time by prefabricating the CRISPR machinery in test tubes, then adding it to the freshly donated immune cells. (eurekalert.org)
  • Innovations in gene editing using CRISPR, RNAi and other technologies can be found in the September 2015 special issue of the Journal of Biomolecular Screening (JBS) on Screening by RNAi and Precise Genome Editing Technologies by guest editors Marc Bickle, Hakim Djaballah and Lorenz Martin Mayr. (slas.org)
  • ethical
  • Genetics researcher He Jiankui said his lab considered ethical issues before deciding to proceed with DNA editing of human embryos to create twin girls with a modification to reduce their risk of HIV infection. (npr.org)
  • While it was named " Breakthrough of the Year " in 2015 by Science magazine, ethical debate has swirled around CRISPR over how it could be used - for good or ill - to make changes to our DNA down the line. (cbsnews.com)
  • scissors
  • Think of CRISPR as working somewhat like microscopic scissors that snip out an unwanted piece of DNA and then replace that with a new piece. (cbsnews.com)
  • biology
  • This [study] is the first step in understanding the biology that actually leads to obesity in order to solve it by helping researchers understand what to treat based on the obstructed pathways that affect an individual, their propensity toward obesity, and help to develop more individualized treatment," Carless said. (therivardreport.com)
  • The dual ability of CRISPR nucleases to nick and cleave DNA has implications for the use of CRISPR nucleases as genome editing tools and for basic biology of the bacterial immune system. (technologynetworks.com)
  • In a paper published in bioRxiv - a pre-print server for biology research which is not a peer reviewed journal - the researchers pointed out the CUMC study had several serious problems. (futurism.com)
  • allow researchers
  • Whereas DNA editing makes permanent changes to the genome of a cell, the CRISPR-based RNA-targeting approach may allow researchers to make temporary changes that can be adjusted up or down, and with greater specificity and functionality than existing methods for RNA interference. (broadinstitute.org)
  • cell
  • The desired editing occurs rapidly, and then the cell degrades the CRISPR machinery so it can't go on making changes. (eurekalert.org)
  • From these data, the researchers traced the cell lineages. (phys.org)
  • Researchers have known that p63 drives squamous cell cancers. (medicalnewser.com)
  • UC Davis stem cell scientist and blogger Paul Knoepfle r has been busy this week, posting updates on CRISPR and two persons who have been behind the drive against the research use of human emrbryonic stem cells. (blogspot.com)
  • time
  • This was the first time CRISPR has been used to shut down HIV replication and eliminate the virus from animal cells. (cbsnews.com)
  • I remember the first time I heard of CRISPR-reading the summary of a paper published in Science by Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley and colleagues. (slas.org)
  • controversy
  • Since first being developed a mere five years ago, CRISPR has generated excitement and controversy in equal measures. (cbsnews.com)
  • advantages
  • One of the advantages of CRISPR is its high efficiency on difficult to transfect cells," Cheng and Deng told The Scientist . (talfeed.com)
  • resistance
  • While this study isn't the first to use edited stem cells to develop HIV-resistance in immune cells , it is the first example of using CRISPR to edit CCR5. (talfeed.com)
  • science
  • Described today in Science , the innovations build on the team's earlier version of SHERLOCK (shorthand for Specific High Sensitivity Reporter unLOCKing) and add to a growing field of research that harnesses CRISPR systems for uses beyond gene editing. (mit.edu)
  • cells
  • In the future, researchers will be able to use the lineage trees of all cells traceable with LINNAEUS to formulate new hypotheses regarding questions such as these. (phys.org)
  • precision
  • I never thought that this CRISPR system was going to be working out so beautifully with such efficiency and precision when it first came onto the scene," Kamel Khalili, director of Temple's center for neurovirology, told CBS News. (cbsnews.com)
  • ability
  • The virus' ability to remain hidden in latent reservoirs makes eliminating it particularly challenging, which is why Chinese researchers decided to test a different approach. (talfeed.com)