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  • organism
  • Dr. Paul McHugh, psychiatry professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, argues that "without fooling around with it," the cloning process does not produce a viable human organism and should be regarded as tissue culture. (lifeissues.net)
  • As a noun, a clone is an identical genetic copy of either a piece of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), a cell, or a whole organism. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Reproductive cloning is used initially to produce a cell with the same nuclear DNA as its parent cell, a process also referred to as nuclear transfer technology, with the final goal of producing an entire cloned organism. (smore.com)
  • bioethics
  • The most public debate in bioethics today centers on the technology of cloning. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • The Bioethics Advisory Committee consisted of thirteen members who contribute expertise from many professions including law, medicine, politics, journalism, and university research. (asu.edu)
  • Issues of human genetics and bioethics in Europe have been widely accepted as human rights issues concerning human dignity and fundamental freedoms of the citizens," according to Emilia Ianeva, director of the Center for Human Rights at California State University, Hayward. (publicintegrity.org)
  • Controversy continues to swirl around killing even long-abandoned human embryos for research," said John Kilner, president of the Chicago-based Center for Bioethics and Human Dignity. (religionnewsblog.com)
  • There are some undecided people out there, and California is a state where a lot of biotech research will take place,' said Arthur Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania. (wired.com)
  • Years earlier, in October of 1995, Clinton had established the National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC) in light of bioethical concerns over research on humans. (scribd.com)
  • gene
  • To find which of the colonies includes the human insulin gene, use a probe. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In this type of cloning, a fragment of DNA is inserted into an element capable of self-replication such as a bacterial plasmid, which in turn is inserted into a host cell, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, in order to create multiple copies of the original gene. (smore.com)
  • Using a special technique called DNA microarray analysis, in which large numbers of genes are examined on a gene chip, the researchers were able to measure the functioning of more than 10,000 genes in cells from cloned mice. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • 2. In addition to HGA's Director, Dr David King, who is a molecular biologist, the signatories of the letter include Dr Michael Antoniou, a leading gene therapy research, Dr Richard Nicholson. (hgalert.org)
  • Adult DNA cloning is a process of cloning a gene. (writework.com)
  • diseases
  • The potential uses of therapeutic cloning include cures and treatments for many diseases. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Cloned cells could be used to create replacement tissue for diseased hearts, pancreatic cells for diabetics, treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, nerve cells for victims of spinal cord injuries, and skin cells for burn victims. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Groups that advocate cures for specific diseases disagree - and note that human embryos are destroyed daily in fertility clinics, in abortions, and in natural miscarriages. (religionnewsblog.com)
  • Cloning of human cells has numerous applications in medical research that may lead to cures and treatments for diseases and disabilities such as diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, various types of cancer, heart disease, and spinal cord injury. (bio.org)
  • Thus far, these human replacement cells appear to function normally in vitro, raising the possibility for their application in the treatment of devastating chronic diseases affecting these tissue types. (bio.org)
  • The so-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC's) that a Japanese group figured how to make from ordinary body cells in 2007 are already being used in many labs to study the genetics of these diseases, along with cells from the most controversial source: donated human embryos. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Senator Brownback and I may have different views about stem cell research -- and that debate will take place sometime in the Senate in the near future -- but we are in complete agreement on the need to ban human cloning, which is very different than stem cell research and the procedures used to try to find cures for diseases. (votesmart.org)
  • The main goal of HESC research is to identify the mechanisms that govern cell differentiation and to turn HESCs into specific cell types that can be used for treating debilitating and life-threatening diseases and injuries. (stanford.edu)
  • While the benefits of stem cells in the treatment of a myriad of diseases can hardly be disputed, there is also a consciousness of the potential deleterious effects on society if flesh-and-blood human copies were ever created. (outerplaces.com)
  • But the researchers insist that this concern is separate from the purely medical interest in treatments for diseases such as diabetes, and that nearly all professionals are opposed to human cloning. (outerplaces.com)
  • With further research, stem cells may be used to generate replacement cells that can treat conditions such as heart disease, Alzheimer's, cancer, and other diseases where a person has damaged tissues. (customtermpapers.org)
  • Second, cloning should not continue, because the cloned creature does not have any special abilities or special characteristics, therefore it could still be affected by common illnesses and diseases. (writework.com)
  • ethics
  • EDITOR'S NOTE: Two of the most hotly debated and currently controversial topics-in the fields of science, religion, ethics, and politics-are human cloning and stem-cell research. (apologeticspress.org)
  • This was all done before much debate had been had over the ethics of human cloning. (scribd.com)
  • Editor of the Bulletin of Medical Ethics, Dr Bill Albert, a member of the government's Human Genetics Commission and Professor Hilary Rose, a leading feminist academic. (hgalert.org)
  • ethically
  • One does wonder, however, how Catholic bioethicist Tauer "ethically" condones reproductive cloning, an activity that is condemned by the Church? (lifeissues.net)
  • The fact that they cannot develop into healthy offspring is sometimes cited as a reason why their destruction in research is less problematic ethically than the destruction of embryos with better developmental potential. (thehastingscenter.org)
  • While we understand the good intentions behind the proposal, we believe it to be unnecessary and highly unlikely to offer significant benefits: moreover it is ethically problematic and risks facilitating reproductive cloning. (hgalert.org)
  • organs
  • Some believe that it is possible to grow human organs outside a body, or perhaps in the body of another animal, that could then be harvested for transplanting into humans. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • Five piglets are cloned by a company the eventually wants to reproduce organs for humans. (infoplease.com)
  • subhuman creatures with usable organs but no head, no brain, no consciousness to identify them with the human family? (brightkite.com)
  • nucleus
  • Since the nucleus of virtually every animal cell contains the entire genome of the animal, it might seem easy enough to clone an animal by placing the nucleus in an egg cell from which the nucleus has been removed. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In 1938, Spelmann stated that the way forward for this area of research should be by inserting the nucleus of a differentiated cell into an enucleated egg. (smore.com)
  • When an animal is cloned, the nucleus of a mature adult cell is removed and inserted into an egg whose nucleus has been removed. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • cures
  • I'd say just as a very clear comment, we are all for cures and everybody is for cures of ailments that are affecting human society, that are affecting people in this country and around the world. (votesmart.org)
  • And I'm fearful that in the great intent that people have in moving forward with human cloning that what they're failing to do is to look at the human species as having inherent dignity and something that's worth standing up for and worth fighting for, instead -- in looking for cures, turning people into property and into research animals and spare parts. (votesmart.org)
  • 2000
  • In the August and September 2000 issues, I penned two articles on "Cracking the Code-The Human Genome Project in Perspective. (apologeticspress.org)
  • California has been the leader in the debate on cloning since it became the first state in the union to publicly address the subject of human cloning in January 2000 when the panel had its first meeting . (wired.com)
  • genetics
  • Tom Strachan and Andrew P. Read, Human Molecular Genetics 2 (2nd ed. (lifeissues.net)
  • Although these mutations might not be apparent at the time of cloning, genetics problems could become exacerbated in future generations. (yowusa.com)
  • The recommendation to go ahead with therapeutic cloning will clash with the government's stated policies,' said Stuart Newman, a member of the Council for Responsible Genetics . (wired.com)
  • 1. Human Genetics Alert is an independent watchdog group funded by a leading British charity. (hgalert.org)
  • 1998
  • Nineteen European countries including France, Spain, the United Kingdom, and Germany signed a treaty in 1998 prohibiting human cloning (DuPrau 77). (scribd.com)
  • prohibition
  • The specific bill is H.R.234 -- the Human Cloning Prohibition Act of 2003 (Introduced in House) January 8, 2003, by Dave Weldon (R) of Florida. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Today Senator Landrieu and myself and a total of 28 co-sponsors, along with Senator DeMint that's here with us today are introducing the human cloning prohibition act. (votesmart.org)
  • What our prohibition does is recognize that inherent dignity of every human being, regardless of how they're created, and say that this person has value and is special and should not be used as a research animal, should not be used as a commodity, should not be created for spare parts. (votesmart.org)
  • technology
  • Whenever the deliberations of BAC and all of its subcommittees are finalized, they send their recommendations to the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). (asu.edu)
  • In reality, a new clone war is developing over human cloning technology. (yowusa.com)
  • Nonetheless, human cloning technology has already reached a stage where there is nothing anyone can do to stop it from progressing on a covert basis. (yowusa.com)
  • The following background paper highlights BIO's perspective on the difference between using cloning technology to theoretically clone a human being and the beneficial uses of cloning technology in medicine and agriculture. (bio.org)
  • Recombinant DNA technology or molecular cloning has been in use since the 1970's and is commonplace in the field of molecular biology. (smore.com)
  • The promotion of such benefits has further obsucred the many social, economic and environmental aspects of health and disease -- what causes the ill-health and disease which these potential applications of cloning technology might treat? (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • Reproductive cloning is a technology used to generate an animal that has the same DNA as another currently or previously existing animal. (writework.com)
  • scientific
  • The "scientific" claims made in the article below are so absurd, profuse, and so blatantly fly in the face of internationally accepted scientific facts that it could only be construed as pure propaganda constructed solely to advance a research agenda that would otherwise be abhorrent to the public. (lifeissues.net)
  • A*STAR is Singapore's lead government agency that connects scientific research to economic policies. (asu.edu)
  • The incredible brouhaha created by global cloning efforts has spawned equally incredible scientific scenarios-which are turning into reality even as we write this series of articles. (apologeticspress.org)
  • These countries, along with countries from other regions of the world, have greatly expanded the scope of stem cell research, creating an array of scientific advances and medical applications. (pewforum.org)
  • See my article 6 listing reproductive cloning studies from various scientific journals, PubMed, etc. (lifeissues.net)
  • However, at present, the consensus in the scientific community is that both HESC and iPSC research should be pursued, as we do not yet know whether iPSCs have the same potential as HESCs or whether it is safe to transplant them into humans. (stanford.edu)
  • The American Medical Association, the National Academy of Sciences, the Association of American Universities, and many other medical, scientific, and educational associations endorse therapeutic cloning. (innovations-report.com)
  • Though actual human cloning has not yet been achieved, other relevant scientific endeavours have been successful. (scribd.com)
  • And this is indeed what we are experiencing today in these cloning debates -- the abuse of language, especially scientific language, in the pursuit of power. (lifeissues.net)
  • And all it will take is to present the simple objective scientific truth, the truth that a new unique innocent vulnerable living human being begins to exist immediately at both fertilization and at cloning . (lifeissues.net)
  • 3. See the attached letter for detailed scientific arguments concerning the weakness of the research. (hgalert.org)