Loading...
  • ethical
  • Information on presidential actions and legislative activities related to the ethical and moral issues surrounding cloning is provided, as well as relevant Web sites. (unt.edu)
  • Outi Hovatta, in "The new reproductive biology medical and technical possibilities vs. ethical and legal concerns" "In the future, stem cell lines may be created from an HLA-identical embryo as identified by PGD. (oecd-ilibrary.org)
  • But it hopes the ethical and scientific questions about when and how embryos are used will be determined by a parliamentary committee that begins hearings this fall, Health Minister Allan Rock's spokesman said in late July. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Human cloning has moved closer to reality, and even therapeutic cloning is fraught with ethical perils. (washingtontimes.com)
  • However, clinical application of stem cells raises numerous ethical and safety concerns. (medsci.org)
  • In this review, we provide an overview of the most important ethical issues in stem cell therapy, as a contribution to the controversial debate about their clinical usage in regenerative and transplantation medicine. (medsci.org)
  • We describe ethical challenges regarding human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, emphasizing that ethical dilemma involving the destruction of a human embryo is a major factor that may have limited the development of hESC-based clinical therapies. (medsci.org)
  • We describe and discuss ethical challenges regarding human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, therapeutic potential and clinical translation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and safety issues of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy. (medsci.org)
  • These ethical concerns have prompted several nations to pass laws regarding human cloning and its legality. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to ensure that federal funds are used to support only stem cell research that is scientifically sound, legal, and ethical, the NIH will examine the derivation of all existing stem cell lines and create a registry of those lines that satisfy this criteria. (archives.gov)
  • Since the first fertilization of a human egg in the laboratory in 1968, scientific and technological breakthroughs have raised ethical dilemmas and generated policy controversies on both sides of the Atlantic. (scribd.com)
  • Over time, he argues, partisan debate and religious-secular polarization have come to overshadow ethical reflection and political deliberation on the moral status of the embryo and the promise of biomedical research. (scribd.com)
  • I believe that the moral status of the embryo and the promise of biomedical research to reduce human suffering are critical and complex ethical issues. (scribd.com)
  • Taiwan Department of Health, "Ethical Regulations for Embryonic Stem Cell Research," 2002. (umn.edu)
  • While the principal source of the controversy surrounding HESC research lies in competing views about the value of human embryonic life, the scope of ethical issues in HESC research is broader than the question of the ethics of destroying human embryos. (stanford.edu)
  • Technical and financial hurdles add to ethical and safety concerns over embryonic stems cells while adult stem cells are achieving remarkable clinic successes. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • ISIS had already pointed out at the time that research on hES cells was ethically unjustifiable, especially given that adult stem cells, easily obtainable from the patients themselves (see Box 1), appeared just as developmentally flexible as ES cells, and showed much greater promise in the clinic without either the ethical concerns or the risks of cancer from hES cells [2- (i-sis.org.uk)
  • The donation of eggs, sperm and embryos to support this work is essential and I ensure that we are compliant with all the necessary ethical and regulatory procedures. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • To this regard, a scientific, ethical, and political debate is recently reviving in Italy about the utilization of stem cells in regenerative medicine. (hindawi.com)
  • Above all, it is universally agreed that the use of adult stem cells does not entail any ethical problems. (vatican.va)
  • Technical problems aside, the need to extract these cells from living human embryos raises ethical questions of the highest order. (vatican.va)
  • Indeed, even putting aside fundamental ethical considerations other than the patient's expectations, the present state of 'therapeutic cloning' precludes, now and in the near future, any clinical application. (vatican.va)
  • Around the world, researchers and politicians have struggled to develop guidelines that will allow for ethical and socially responsible stem cell research. (spusa.org)
  • Upon this base of activities and relationships, GPI serves as a communications channel, helping to build the knowledge base needed for ethical and thoughtful policy-making in support of scientifically and medically worthy research and clinical translation in the broad field of stem cells and the even broader field of developmental biology. (nih.gov)
  • In making this point, GPI fully recognizes the gravity of the ethical responsibilities entailed by hESC and human induced pluripotent stem cell ( iPSC ) research and regenerative medicine and the need for the stem cell research guidelines as adopted by NIH to fully respect and reflect these responsibilities. (nih.gov)
  • Here we want to emphasize a common theme that runs through this letter: the concept that the Final Guidelines should be regarded as a safe harbor , not as the only set of procedures by which applicants for NIH funding can establish that the derivation of hESCs proposed for use in research can meet the ethical requirements embodied in the Draft Guidelines. (nih.gov)
  • Application of this framework demonstrates that in certain instances these other sources may offer means of compliance with ethical responsibilities that extend beyond the Draft Guidelines.1 We believe a safe harbor approach also promotes the collaborative, cross-jurisdictional studies required for global progress in stem cell science and regenerative medicine. (nih.gov)
  • gametes
  • Bill containing rules relating to the use of gametes and embryos (Embryos Bill), Parliamentary Documents II, 2000/01, 27 423, nos. (umn.edu)
  • The Canadian legislation, which must still pass through the Senate to become law, bans human cloning (for both reproductive and therapeutic purposes), the creation of human-animal hybrid embryos, sex selection of embryos for non-medical reasons, payments to women acting as surrogates, payment for donated gametes and the buying or selling of human embryos. (ivf.net)
  • Under the Act, donors must give fully informed written consent before their gametes or embryos are used, and children born following donation will be entitled to receive medical information about the donors. (ivf.net)
  • Meiosis is the process of cell division in sexually reproducing organisms that results in a reduction in the number of chromosomes in reproductive cells and leads to the production of gametes in animals (male gametes are sperm and female gametes are eggs) and spores in plants. (highlighthealth.com)
  • While somatic cells are diploid, gametes are only haploid. (biomedcentral.com)
  • regulation
  • The "government's preference" is outlined in a draft bill on regulation of reproductive technologies, allowing use of eggs fertilized in a laboratory for the original purpose of impregnating a woman who had been unable to conceive. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • The poll suggested that 86 per cent of Canadians would allow use of embryos in research with proper government regulation. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Minister of Education and Science, Guidelines to the "Law Concerning Regulation Relating to Human Cloning Techniques and Other Similar Techniques," [PDF] December 4, 2001. (umn.edu)
  • This chapter reviews current state and federal regulation of hES cell research in the United States, noting where gaps in regulatory coverage are addressed by the guidelines proposed later in this report ( Chapter 6 ). (nap.edu)
  • More specifically, an important question deals with the impact upon national regulation and social behaviours of the scientific community experts' advice regarding stem cells research and its exploitation for health care purposes. (hindawi.com)
  • Peter R. Brinsden, "Regulation of Assisted Reproductive Technology: The UK Experience," in Peter R. Brinsden, ed. (lifeissues.net)
  • The definition proposed in this paper was subsequently adopted by the Australian Parliament in the Prohibition of Human Cloning for Reproduction and Regulation of Human Embryo Research Amendment Act 2006 to replace the previously used definition. (nhmrc.gov.au)
  • HESCs
  • Scope: This document describes when research activities involving human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), human embryonic germ cells derived from fetal tissue , or hESC- or germ cell-derived test articles are considered human subjects research and what regulatory controls apply to that research. (lifeissues.net)
  • HESCs are characterized by their capacity for self-renewal and their ability to differentiate into all types of cells of the body. (stanford.edu)
  • HESCs are harvested from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, which consists of 30-34 cells. (stanford.edu)
  • 2007). The reprogrammed cells-"induced pluripotent stem cells" (iPSCs)-could ultimately eliminate the need for HESCs. (stanford.edu)
  • However, at present, the consensus in the scientific community is that both HESC and iPSC research should be pursued, as we do not yet know whether iPSCs have the same potential as HESCs or whether it is safe to transplant them into humans. (stanford.edu)
  • It is worth noting that this argument, if sound, would not suffice to show that all or even most HESC research is impermissible, since most investigators engaged in HESC research do not participate in the derivation of HESCs but instead use cell lines that researchers who performed the derivation have made available. (stanford.edu)
  • existing stem cell lines
  • The embryos from which the existing stem cell lines were created have already been destroyed and no longer have the possibility of further development as human beings. (archives.gov)
  • More than 60 existing stem cell lines from genetically diverse populations around the world are expected to be available for federally-funded research. (archives.gov)
  • Today's decision relates only to the use of federal funds for research on existing stem cell lines derived in accordance with the criteria set forth above. (archives.gov)
  • Beyond providing a renewable source of material that might be transplanted into a patient without suppressing their immune system, the generation of autologous pluripotent stem cells provides two key advantages over the large number of existing stem cell lines. (stembook.org)
  • Research
  • With certain restrictions, the President has announced that federal funds may be used to conduct research on human embryonic stem cells. (unt.edu)
  • At the moment, the government would allow stem-cell research using embryos that are less than 14 days old and would otherwise be destroyed. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • The government's draft bill would allow surplus embryos to be used for medical research with the consent of the egg and sperm donors. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Mr. Rock's draft appeared only after the government received polling data showing that most Canadians would allow the use of donated embryos for stem-cell research. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • The federal government does not provide funding for scientific research involving stem cells, but has received patent applications from biotech firms planning to clone embryos for research purposes. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • On Thursday, August 9, 2001, U.S. President George W. Bush's decided to allow federal funding for limited stem-cell research, as provided by the White House. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Federal funding will apply only to research using existing embryonic stem-cell lines, that is, stem cells already harvested from destroyed embryos. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • want to halt stem-cell research that uses fertilized human eggs. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • In a direct appeal to George W. Bush at the papal summer retreat on July 23rd, the Pope told the visiting U.S. President that the creation of human embryos for research purposes is morally wrong. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • But a Vatican spokesman said later that the Pope opposes any stem-cell research using embryos. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • As a consequence, several countries have prohibited human cloning but are racing forward with stem cell research. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Two years ago, the Australian government decided to allow human embryos existing in fertility clinics to be used in stem cell research. (washingtontimes.com)
  • This past December, a Japanese government panel recommended allowing limited stem-cell research on human embryos. (washingtontimes.com)
  • U.S. studies have gone at a slower pace, a consequence of President Bush's decision to limit federal funding of stem-cell research to a small number of lines. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Those issues are examined in some detail in the recently issued report of the President's Council on Bioethics, "Monitoring Stem Cell Research," available at www.bioethics.gov. (washingtontimes.com)
  • BAC's deliberations on embryonic stem cell research helped shape the government policies that helped Singapore pursue its goal of becoming one of the biggest investors of embryonic stem cell research in the early twenty-first century. (asu.edu)
  • One biomedical endeavor the government sought to fund was embryonic stem cell (ESC) research. (asu.edu)
  • By 2000, several countries had declared their stances on the legality of conducting and funding embryonic stem cell research , many with the aid of institutional bioethics boards. (asu.edu)
  • For example, the Human Genetics Subcommittee was created in 2001 and the Subcommittee on Research Involving Human Participants was created in 2007. (asu.edu)
  • In December 2000, BAC began to examine embryonic stem cell research . (asu.edu)
  • Federal funding of research using existing embryonic stem cell lines is consistent with the President's belief in the fundamental value and sanctity of human life. (archives.gov)
  • The President's decision reflects his fundamental commitment to preserving the value and sanctity of human life and his desire to promote vital medical research. (archives.gov)
  • The potential of embryonic stem cell research. (archives.gov)
  • To create embryonic stem cells for research, a "stem cell line" must be created from the inner cell mass of a week-old embryo. (archives.gov)
  • In Embryo Politics , Thomas Banchoff provides a comprehensive overview of political struggles aboutembryo research during four decades in four countries-the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, and France. (scribd.com)
  • Embryo research is one of the few political issues with no historical precedent. (scribd.com)
  • Given the recent false distinction in the cloning debates between "research" and "reproductive" purposes , the Dickey Amendment could be construed in the cloning debates as allowing the cloning of human embryos for "reproductive" purposes" . (lifeissues.net)
  • And if, as with Weissman et al, human cloning is not cloning if it is for " research " purposes, then the Dickey Amendment could even be construed to allow human cloning for "research" purposes . (lifeissues.net)
  • The Dickey Amendment would actually allow the use of living human embryos and fetuses sexually reproduced in purely experimental research under certain dubious circumstances and if the Secretary of DHHS says so. (lifeissues.net)
  • NOTE: What we are clearly beginning to see emerge here is the massive contradictions accruing among several major federal research documents interwoven as "authorities" over the years, using erroneous (or no) scientific definitions for "political" purposes now concretized as stare decisis , ultimately rendering them unconstitutional due to vagueness, and impotent in protecting the lives of both sexually and asexually reproduced human beings in research and in reproduction. (lifeissues.net)
  • This document would seem to directly address the use of cells and tissues derived from living human embryos and fetuses reproduced sexually or asexually in research. (lifeissues.net)
  • Under HHS [OHRP federal] regulations at 45 CFR Part 46, human subject means a living individual about whom an investigator (whether professional or student) conducting research obtains (1) data through intervention or interaction with the individual, or (2) identifiable private information . (lifeissues.net)
  • 1. The definition of " human subject research " is the focus of these Guidances, and references are given to both the current OHRP federal regulations (45 CFR 46) and to Public Law 103-43 (the NIH Revitalization Act). (lifeissues.net)
  • The team, at Massachusetts-based Advanced Cell Technology and the Institute for Stem Cell Research in Los Angeles, say they used the cloning methods to create the stem cells to match a 35-year-old man and a 75-year-old man. (bioethics.net)
  • Countries colored in brown have both a highly competitive economy and a flexible policy on human embryonic stem cell research. (umn.edu)
  • Map is designed to reflect national policy and whether or not public funds may be used to pursue stem cell research using IVF embryos donated from fertility clinics. (umn.edu)
  • Option 3 in Walters, LeRoy , in References , below: "Research is permitted only on remaining embryos no longer needed for reproduction. (umn.edu)
  • California in the U.S. supports embryonic stem cell research through Proposition 71, a $3 billion bonding initiative that is projected to provide about $300 million in stem cell research funding annually for 10 years. (umn.edu)
  • Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: An Intercultural Perspective. (umn.edu)
  • International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). (umn.edu)
  • Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities Bioethics Advisory Committee, "The use of Embryonic Stem Cells for Therapeutic Research," August 2001. (umn.edu)
  • The Council for Science and Technology Policy, chaired by Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, issued its approval of cloning human embryos for basic research, based on recommendations by a subpanel on bioethics in its final report, July 13, 2004. (umn.edu)
  • Human embryonic stem cell (HESC) research offers much hope for alleviating the human suffering brought on by the ravages of disease and injury. (stanford.edu)
  • Opponents of HESC research argue that the research is morally impermissible because it involves the unjust killing of innocent human beings. (stanford.edu)
  • If looked at from a strictly consequentialist perspective, it's almost certainly the case that the potential health benefits from the research outweigh the loss of embryos involved and whatever suffering results from that loss for persons who want to protect embryos. (stanford.edu)
  • However, most of those who oppose the research argue that the constraints against killing innocent persons to promote social utility apply to human embryos. (stanford.edu)
  • Thus, as long as we accept non-consequentialist constraints on killing persons, those supporting HESC research must respond to the claim that those constraints apply to human embryos. (stanford.edu)
  • The standard view of those who oppose HESC research is that a human being begins to exist with the emergence of the one-cell zygote at fertilization. (stanford.edu)
  • In addition, the bill allows embryonic stem (ES) cell research to take place on surplus IVF embryos, but prohibits the creation of embryos specifically for stem cell derivation. (ivf.net)
  • It would be a mistake to assume that the restrictions on federal funding for human embryonic stem (hES) cell research result in an absence of oversight of such work. (nap.edu)
  • Animal care committee reviews of hES cell research that uses nonhuman animals. (nap.edu)
  • and presents comparisons with regulations in other nations that have substantial hES cell research programs. (nap.edu)
  • Recommendations about the application of existing regulatory conventions to hES cell research are offered. (nap.edu)
  • In the context of privately funded research it is particularly difficult to explore mechanisms by which discoveries made using hES cells can be made widely accessible for the benefit of human health. (nap.edu)
  • Several policy statements developed regarding patenting and licensing issues more generally applied in biomedical science can serve as aspirational goals for the hES cell research community. (nap.edu)
  • The first human embryonic stem (hES) cell bank was officially opened in the UK in May 2004 , with Health Minister Lord Warner saying, "This potentially revolutionary research could benefit thousands of patients. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • The centre contains just two stem cell lines developed by research teams at King s College London and the Centre for Life in Newcastle. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • There is simply no case for supporting research in hES cells any longer. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Scientific research within the department is helping to understand the earliest stages of human development from oocyte maturation to the first few days after fertilisation. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • To evaluate the Italian physicians' knowledge/information level about the therapeutic potential of stem cells, the research choice between embryonic and cordonal stem cells, and the preference between autologous and heterologous storage of cordonal stem cells, we performed a national survey. (hindawi.com)
  • They prefer research on cordonal stem cells rather than on embryo stem cells. (hindawi.com)
  • Stem cells research is recently reproposing the paradigmatic case of the reciprocal influence between science and ideological (e.g., political, religious, economic, and social) issues. (hindawi.com)
  • Translational medicine thus represents a stem of scientific research that aims to move "from bench to bedside" or from laboratory experiments through clinical trials to point-of-care patient applications. (hindawi.com)
  • In the United Kingdom, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority has granted permission to research groups at the Roslin Institute and the Newcastle Centre for Life. (bootstrike.com)
  • Proposals to use nucleus transfer techniques in human stem cell research raise a set of concerns beyond the moral status of any created embryo. (bootstrike.com)
  • Much of the hope invested in embryonic stem (ES) cell research surrounds its promise to provide a broad spectrum of medical applications. (stembook.org)
  • This respect demands that any research that is inconsistent with the dignity of the human being is morally excluded. (vatican.va)
  • The Holy See opposes the cloning of human embryos for the purpose of destroying them in order to harvest their stem cells, even for a noble purpose, because it is inconsistent with the ground and motive of human biomedical research, that is, respect for the dignity of human beings. (vatican.va)
  • 3) By contrast, research using human embryonic stem cells has been hampered by important technical difficulties (4). (vatican.va)
  • Induction-Dependent and Lineage-Dependent Models for Cell-Diversification Are Mutually Exclusive," Progress in Clinical Biological Research 175, (1985): 3-11. (lifeissues.net)
  • Stem cell research is one of the hot fields in biomedical science, both in terms of research potential and public controversy. (spusa.org)
  • In 2006, the landscape of stem cell research changed when the creation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were first announced. (spusa.org)
  • Embryonic stem cells have the unique ability to self-replicate indefinitely before creating specialized cells, which is one of the advantages of performing research on them. (spusa.org)
  • At this time researchers are still uncertain of what clinical differences may exist between iPS cells and embryonic stem cells, meaning that, at this time, further research on both kinds of stem cells is necessary to fully understand the medical potential of these new discoveries. (spusa.org)
  • An important part of this research would be the identification of how and why undifferentiated cells become differentiated. (spusa.org)
  • In Australia, human embryonic stem cells are derived from human embryos that are excess to the needs of patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment programs and have been donated to research by the couple for whom they were created. (nhmrc.gov.au)
  • GPI is a not-for-profit organization formed in 2003 with the mission of promoting and defending stem cell research and its application in medicine to develop therapeutics and cures for many otherwise intractable diseases and disorders. (nih.gov)
  • GPI congratulates NIH on its tireless efforts over the past 35 years to achieve a position of global leadership in the field of human embryology through both extramurally funded and intramurally conducted human embryonic stem cell ( hESC ) and related medical research. (nih.gov)
  • fetal
  • Only one group has ever succeeded, and their lines were generated using fetal and infant cells. (bioethics.net)
  • The differential diagnosis includes a pure dysgerminoma, sex cord tumor with annular tubules (SCTAT), unclassified germ cell-sex-cord-stromal tumors, and normal fetal and neonatal ovary (4). (upmc.edu)
  • 78:7634-7638, 1981) or from fetal germ cells (Matsui, et al. (google.es)
  • germ cells
  • Histologic hallmarks are nests containing germ cells (larger cells with clear cytoplasm) and stromal cells of granulosa-Sertoli type. (upmc.edu)
  • In this review, we consider the mRNAs and novel genes with unique expression and imprinting patterns that were discovered using systems biology approaches with primate pluripotent stem and germ cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • differentiate
  • Stem cells have raised tremendous expectations among the medical doctors, researchers, patients, and the general public due to their capacity to differentiate into a broad range of cell types. (medsci.org)
  • This finding is exciting since little is known about the direct signals that allow early ES cells to differentiate into not only somatic tissue but especially germline tissue. (upmc.edu)
  • The embryonic stem cell lines also retain the ability, throughout the culture, to form trophoblast and to differentiate into all tissues derived from all three embryonic germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm). (patents.com)
  • Understanding the fundamentals of biological decisions, including what permits a cell to maintain pluripotency, that is, its ability to self-renew and thereby remain immortal, or to differentiate into multiple types of cells, is of profound importance. (biomedcentral.com)
  • If LIF is removed, mouse ES cells differentiate. (google.es)
  • Mouse ES cells cultured in non-attaching conditions aggregate and differentiate into simple embryoid bodies, with an outer layer of endoderm and an inner core of primitive ectoderm. (google.es)
  • embryology
  • The bill also establishes a regulatory body, the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada (AHRAC), which will license, monitor and enforce the new law and store data on ARTs, in a similar way to the UK's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA). (ivf.net)
  • Bruce M. Carlson, Human Embryology and Developmental Biology , 2nd ed. (lifeissues.net)
  • G.W. Corner, "The Observed Embryology of Human Single-Ovum Twins and Other Multiple Births," American Journal of Obstetrics and. (lifeissues.net)
  • One of the seminal achievements of mammalian embryology of the last decade is the routine insertion of specific genes into the mouse genome through the use of mouse ES cells. (google.es)
  • Thus
  • Thus, the Holy See earnestly encourages investigations that are being carried out in the fields of medicine and biology, with the goal of curing diseases and of improving the quality of life of all, provided that they are respectful of the dignity of the human being. (vatican.va)
  • Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from the embryo and are pluripotent, thus possessing the capability of developing into any organ or tissue type or, at least potentially, into a complete embryo. (google.es)
  • moral
  • Mr. Bush will create a new President's Council on Bioethics to study the human and moral ramifications of developments in biomedical and behavioural science and technology. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • The President will create a new President's Council on Bioethics, chaired by Dr. Leon Kass, an expert in biomedical ethics and a professor at the University of Chicago, to study the human and moral ramifications of developments in biomedical and behaviorial science and technology. (archives.gov)
  • In setting out an argument about the intersection of politics, ethics, and policy, I focus on national bioethics committees, elected leaders, and their efforts to reconcile the moral status of the embryo and the imperative of biomedical progress in practice. (scribd.com)
  • oocytes
  • Homer HA, McDougall A, Levasseur M, Murdoch AP, Herbert M. RNA interference in meiosis I human oocytes: Towards an understanding of human aneuploidy . (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Cytoplasmic factors present in mature, metaphase II (MII)-arrested oocytes have a unique ability to reset the identity of transplanted somatic cell nuclei to the embryonic state. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Therefore, we reasoned that, similar to other mammals, human MII oocytes must contain reprogramming activity. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • development
  • Recording and contextualizing the science of embryos, development, and reproduction. (asu.edu)
  • Diagram of the ways to reprogram cells along with the development of humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • This process of disaggregating the blastocyst's cells eliminates its potential for further development. (stanford.edu)
  • This is enounced by the European Court of Justice in the Brüstle case, which defines the human embryo as the beginning of the development of the human being. (europa.eu)
  • However, concerns regarding safety and differentaion efficiency exist, as mouse parthenogenetic embryos are unable to complete full development due to the absense of paternally expressed imprinted genes, and tissues derived from parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells appear to have growth defects . (highlighthealth.com)
  • Choudhary M, Zhang X, Lako M, Stojkovic M, Murdoch A. "Beauty and Beast" molecule: HA in early human development . (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Clifford Grobstein, "The Early Development of Human Embryos," Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10, (1985): 213-236. (lifeissues.net)
  • Studying human embryonic stem cells could provide information on the complex process of human development. (spusa.org)
  • The unlimited proliferative ability and plasticity to generate other cell types ensures that stem cells represent a dynamic system apposite for the identification of new molecular targets and the production and development of novel drugs. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Human ES cell lines may, therefore, prove clinically relevant to the development of safer and more effective drugs for patients presenting with diabetes mellitus. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Therefore, the ESCs are closely related to the inner cell mass, from which, via post-implantation development, the embryo and fetus form. (biomedcentral.com)