• Over the last decade the histories of religion and of medicine in the early modern period have developed a more conceptually robust demeanour embracing the achievements and examples of works like Keith Thomas' Religion and the Decline of Magic (1971) and Charles Webster's The Great Instauration (1975). (history.ac.uk)
  • Funding for RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY is provided by Lilly Endowment. (pbs.org)
  • He has written and spoken widely on medical ethics and the role of religion in healing, and he has worked in a clinic on the west side of Chicago, a North Carolina clinic for migrant workers, and a garbage dump in Guatemala City. (wabash.edu)
  • Whether exploring and interpreting the impact of diverse Protestant theologies and beliefs upon the universities, the parishes, or the popular mentalité, historians of religion have become comfortable with exploring the nature, meaning and function of 'religion' in early modern historiography. (history.ac.uk)
  • Another strategy has concentrated upon 'popular' religion, the beliefs and activities of the common people performed in the parish or the environment of the family. (history.ac.uk)
  • I just need the opinions and beliefs of various people, of different ages and religions. (livejournal.com)
  • indeed, religion makes a virtue out of ignoring the evidence and accepting various beliefs on faith alone. (respectfulinsolence.com)
  • Embryology was a site for both religious and medical theorists to contemplate profound questions of being and becoming, where topics such as pharmacology and nosology were left to shape secular medicine. (bookdepository.com)
  • The author of the Book of Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) highly respected the medical profession, even at a time (second century B.C.) when medicine was in its infancy. (mentalhealth.com)
  • This has alarmed many in the medical profession who believe religion and medicine should not mix. (balkaninsight.com)
  • For Western medicine, and perhaps for all scientific and technological thinking, the most important problem in the medical world is how to manipulate the body or the psyche in order to get the effects that we desire. (abc.net.au)
  • According to associate professor Farr Curlin, it is a first step in which people will learn to deal religion broadly with medical education and profession. (ebscohost.com)
  • According to Farr A. Curlin, co-director of the Program on Medicine and Religion, shared prayer between a patient and a physician is not a clinical intervention or a medical technique. (ebscohost.com)
  • Religion had a fairly big impact on medicine in the Egyptian times, it helped to increase medical knowledge. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Priests had quite a big role in medicine, they were the beginnings of professional doctors - often turned to for medical advice. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • The development of science and medicine pioneered by Galen, a philosopher whose medical knowledge and theory guided practitioners for almost two millennia, hit levels of exploration and understanding in ancient Rome that warranted its basis as common medical theory. (wmich.edu)
  • There are medical documents available for analysis, but it is just as important to look at the literature that reflects fears and public opinion about medicine. (wmich.edu)
  • He received his B.A. and M.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has received numerous awards, including the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship, the Terri Brenneman Award for 'the graduating student who has most demonstrated a commitment to the underserved,' the Cecil G. Sheps Award in Social Medicine, and the Norris Brookens Award as the Outstanding Internal Medical Resident in Illinois. (wabash.edu)
  • Over the years, I've often likened non-science-based medical belief systems to religion. (respectfulinsolence.com)
  • Through religion it is taught that birth is not a disease that needs treatment but a part of the life. (gvsu.edu)
  • The public, then as well as now, used literature as a medium through which they projected how they viewed their reality, including views of medicine and disease. (wmich.edu)
  • After all, what is the German New Medicine, other than the claim that cancerous tumors are not the disease, but rather a manifestation of buried emotional traumas that cause the "protective" mechanism of a tumor to result? (respectfulinsolence.com)
  • Religion' to a Christopher Haigh or a John Morrill, or a Jonathon Clark or a Christopher Hill, may invoke very different, contradictory and perhaps radically incommensurable understandings of ecclesiastical institutions, patterns of belief, articulations of meaning, processes of communal identity, or discourses of legitimation. (history.ac.uk)
  • Doctors that follow this form of "Christian medicine" typically endorse the apparent health benefits of prayer and fasting, advocated by the Church, while sharing the Church's view of abortion, contraception and homosexuality as grave sins. (balkaninsight.com)
  • Of course, as I've also mentioned before, it is that insistence on belief and total commitment shared by religion and alternative medicine that provides quacks with an "out" when their treatments don't yield the promised results, their frequent excuse being to blame the patient. (respectfulinsolence.com)
  • It is recognized by now that religious people generally enjoy more quality of life, live more healthily and longer and tend less to depression and suicide provided that it is a religion which emphasizes positive human values like love, justice, welfare, freedom, etc. (unexplained-mysteries.com)
  • Approaches like the latter are isolated from their cultural and religious roots by the Western complementary and alternative medicine and directed against migraine. (unexplained-mysteries.com)
  • Medicine and "fringe" religious traditions (e.g. (rsa.org)
  • More specifically, I was reminded that the similarity between religious thinking and quackery can lead to situations where religion facilitates belief in quackery. (respectfulinsolence.com)
  • Many of these papers attempt to correct shortcomings in the previous religion-health literature, including a lack of good theoretical grounding and lack of longitudinal, or long-duration, research methodologies. (patheos.com)
  • This paper examines both sides of the Roman reality: literature and medicine. (wmich.edu)
  • These theories differ between the Indian religions, with esoteric Buddhist literature mentioning four Chakras, while esoteric Hindu texts stating seven. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ahmed Ragab is the Richard T. Watson Assistant Professor of Science and Religion at Harvard Divinity School, where he also directs the Science, Religion, and Culture Program. (cambridge.org)
  • Both science and religion offer parts to the whole of reality. (wmich.edu)
  • It is both fascinating and necessary to evaluate the balance and relationship between science and religion. (wmich.edu)
  • Organization promoting the involvement and study of all races, genders, religions and ethnicities in the field of orthopedic surgery. (dmoztools.net)
  • Generally, it is acknowledged that religions regulate the feelings of the people and therefore have an effect on the immune system and the psyche. (unexplained-mysteries.com)
  • Also on the show was Jeff Polish, executive director of The Monti , who is curating a storytelling show featuring stories about the intersection of medicine and religion this Friday at the Carolina Theatre. (duke.edu)
  • The article reports on the launch of a new program regarding the role of religion in practicing medicine, by the University Of Chicago School Of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois, trusted by the John Templeton Foundation. (ebscohost.com)
  • New program will study the role of religion in practicing medicine. (ebscohost.com)
  • Nonprofit program for comprehensive end-of-life care for all individuals without regard to race, religion or financial situation. (dmoztools.net)
  • Her ethnographic research on the Great Way of Former Heaven sectarian movement and Cantonese women's vegetarian halls in Singapore in the 1950s was an early contribution to the study of sub-cultural groups in a complex urban society, and she asked insightful questions about the relationship between religion, secularism, and modernity. (universitypressscholarship.com)
  • More recently, developing from the writings of two Cambridge historians in the 1980s, the study of religion has become more political. (history.ac.uk)
  • Among the small group assisting with the catering are a pharmacy student and Ciprian's younger sister, who hopes to study medicine herself. (balkaninsight.com)
  • Amiable and neatly bearded, he wears a rosary on his wrist and long gave up watching TV in order to make time for medicine and voluntary work. (balkaninsight.com)
  • Religion has had positive and negative effects on the development of medicine through time. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • This conference therefore aims to explore the connection between medicine and religion across the time-span of the late medieval and early modern eras, and from an intercultural perspective. (rsa.org)
  • In the five states where it's legal, physician-assisted dying involves rigorous regulations, including how long a person has lived there, says Cathy Lynn Grossman, senior national correspondent for Religion News Service. (pbs.org)
  • They have great faith in prayer for healing, but somehow feel that medicine and prayer are opposed. (mentalhealth.com)
  • The following passage from the New American Bible (Book of Sirach [Ecclesiasticus] 38:1-15) helps to explain how medicine and prayer are not opposed. (mentalhealth.com)
  • If the anthropological tradition was interested in exploring (very crudely) the meaning that religion had for early modern society, those who emphasized the political dimensions of religion ultimately stressed the connections between religion and power. (history.ac.uk)
  • Chakra (IAST: C̣akra, meaning "wheel, circle"), sometimes spelled Cakra or Cakka, is any center of subtle body believed to be a psychic-energy center in the esoteric traditions of Indian religions. (wikipedia.org)
  • An understanding of how to improve patient adherence to treatment plans can also be found through religion. (gvsu.edu)
  • Angelical Conjunction" was the term coined by the seventeenth-century New England Puritan Cotton Mather to denote the mutual affinity of medicine and religion. (rsa.org)
  • The medicine man would sing and dance to send the patient into a trance before asking the spirit to leave the body. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • This biblical passage clearly states that God cures through the skill of the doctor and through medicine. (mentalhealth.com)
  • With a similar intent the collection of essays edited by M.A. Goldie, and others, invoked the phrase 'the politics of religion' to identify the importance of the ecclesiological nexus between Church and State. (history.ac.uk)
  • Religion then was as much a system of administration, a tool of state formation or legitimation, as a generator of meaning and cultural order. (history.ac.uk)