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  • substances
  • The report goes on to compare Fukushima with the Chernobyl accident of 1986, where it says 5,200,000 TBq of "radioactive substances" were leaked into the atmosphere. (enenews.com)
  • The legislation could adversely affect our relations with our European allies, impact upon the civilian nuclear power industry, and raise questions regarding the use of radioactive substances in medical diagnosis and treatment. (ratical.org)
  • Tokyo (CNN) -- Reactors at two Japanese power plants can no longer cool radioactive substances, a government official said Saturday, adding that a small leak had been detected at one of the facilities. (cnn.com)
  • The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 authorizes EPA and other federal agencies to respond to releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances and created a trust fund to provide for certain cleanup activities. (gao.gov)
  • Radioactive substances are used in increasing numbers of hospitals, industries, and research establishments. (pitzer.edu)
  • The federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has released a final report of the public health assessment (PHA) the agency completed on the Safety Light Corporation Superfund Site located at 4150-A Old Berwick Road, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania. (cdc.gov)
  • ATSDR's analyses showed that various contaminants were detected in the samples, including radioactive substances, metals, and organic compounds. (cdc.gov)
  • HLRW
  • Thompson makes clear that a partial drain down of a high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) storage pool is an even worse-case scenario than a complete drain down, for air cooling provided by convection currents -- which might otherwise prevent ignition of the irradiated nuclear fuel's combustible zirconium cladding -- is blocked by the layer of water in the bottom of the pool. (beyondnuclear.org)
  • Using deep boreholes for the final disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) can take advantage of multiple geologic barriers as safety features and aims for the safe containment of radionuclides by containment-providing rock zones (CPRZ). (mdpi.com)
  • The disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) using deep boreholes in geological formations (salt rock) had been previously considered in Germany a long time ago [ 1 ] but was not pursued then. (mdpi.com)
  • Health
  • We discuss how to identify cement asbestos transite air ducts, what the safety & health hazards are, how to seal or abandon the ductwork, & alternative approaches. (inspectapedia.com)
  • This was countered by William H. Taft IV, general counsel for the Department of Defense who wrote that Cranston's bill created "the unmistakable impression that exposure to low-level ionizing radiation is a significant health hazard" and would be "damaging to every aspect of the Department of Defense's nuclear weapons and nuclear propulsion programs. (ratical.org)
  • Historical air monitoring data from the 1950s and deer thyroid data collected between 1979 and 1989 were supplied to ATSDR during Public Health Assessment research of I-131 releases from the X-10 Site. (cdc.gov)
  • Aside from the most recent fire in Williamsburg, most of these events have gone under-reported and little to no public information was released regarding the potential health and safety hazards presented by these fires. (nag-brooklyn.org)
  • You cannot see or smell radon, but it can become a health hazard when it accumulates indoors. (water-research.net)
  • Concern about granite building materials being health hazard arises due to these factors. (sbwire.com)
  • ATSDR determined that radon gas in the buildings formerly occupied on the site was a health hazard to workers during times the facility was operational. (cdc.gov)
  • ATSDR's analyses for the other contaminants detected indicated that no negative health effects are expected from exposure to those contaminants, because people were not exposed at levels high enough to be harmful.Therefore, the other contaminants are not a hazard to public health, and no further action is needed concerning those contaminants. (cdc.gov)
  • radium
  • Not all radioactive elements are dangerous in the same way as radium. (pitzer.edu)
  • It is quite possible that, for individuals prone to leukemia, strontium-90 poses hazards in addition to those that would be expected on the basis of criteria derived from experiences with radium. (pitzer.edu)
  • Waste
  • 3. Impacts on Radioactive Waste Management? (nirs.org)
  • Several of the underground storage tanks currently used to store waste at Hanford have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. (unt.edu)
  • Understanding and quantifying the physical mechanisms and waste properties that govern gas release during salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues. (unt.edu)
  • An unfinished $16.8 billion complex to treat chemical and radioactive waste at the Hanford site in Central Washington continues to have problems that risk explosions and radioactive releases from unintended nuclear reactions, according to a Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board report. (nuclear-news.net)
  • The goal is to transform 56 million gallons of chemical and radioactive waste into glass rods that can be safely put into long-term storage. (nuclear-news.net)
  • It will concentrate, and then filter out solid high-level radioactive waste that is some of the most challenging material stored in the tanks. (nuclear-news.net)
  • Historically, these communities have been overburdened by pollution from toxic waste sites, waste transfer stations, a sewage treatment plant, radioactive waste storage site, and Superfund sites. (nag-brooklyn.org)
  • toxic
  • Toxic chemicals like dioxins and furans, volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and elevated particulate matter are some of the potentially hazardous chemicals that may be released in the event of a major commercial/industrial fire. (nag-brooklyn.org)
  • radon
  • This article explains the potential hazards of transite (cement asbestos) air ducts - asbestos fiber release, radon, and indoor air quality concerns, and duct collapse when transite air ducts are is found in buildings. (inspectapedia.com)
  • Polunium is also radioactive - it is this element, which is produced by radon in the air and in people's lungs, that can hurt lung tissue and cause lung cancer. (water-research.net)
  • DENVER, CO / ACCESSWIRE / December 3, 2018 / Radon is a hazardous and commonly occurring natural gas that is radioactive and believed to be the second leading cause of lung cancer. (oilandgas360.com)
  • Bob Goldstein, US Nuclear CEO, says, "Solving the Radon problem was a natural for US Nuclear since we understand radioactive monitoring and measuring probably better than anyone in the construction industry and we provide some of the most accurate detection devices in the world. (oilandgas360.com)
  • uranium
  • When fissile uranium absorbs a neutron, it starts fissioning and releases energy, emitting several neutrons. (nirs.org)
  • It is the earth's only naturally produced radioactive gas and comes from the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. (water-research.net)
  • plutonium
  • This is the accessible text file for GAO report number GAO-06-164T entitled 'Securing U.S. Nuclear Materials: Poor Planning Has Complicated DOE's Plutonium Consolidation Efforts' which was released on October 7, 2005. (gao.gov)
  • Without a monitoring capability, DOE faces increased risks of an accidental plutonium release that could harm workers, the public, and the environment. (gao.gov)
  • potentially
  • Potentially dangerous problems in cooling radioactive material appear to have cropped up there, as well as at another of the Tokyo Electric Power Co. nuclear plants, Ichiro Fujisaki, Japan's ambassador to the United States, confirmed to CNN. (cnn.com)
  • gases
  • Research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has sought to quantify the release of flammable gases during salt well pumping operations. (unt.edu)
  • earthquake
  • Three of the Daiichi reactor's six units shut down because of the earthquake, while operations at the other three were out due to 'regular inspection,' the Tokyo Electric Power Co. said in a news release Saturday. (cnn.com)
  • massive
  • I cant seem to find any independent info on the contamination in the Pacific Ocean, there has been a ship and motorcycle that made it to the west coast already and those got a ton of press, but the massive oil/chemical/radioactive tsunami backwash gets almost no press. (enenews.com)
  • defense
  • Tom Cochran, a senior scientist with the National Resource Defense Council, explained that this was likely done to release growing pressure inside both atomic plants. (cnn.com)
  • Similarly, the Department of Defense (DOD) addresses hazards at thousands of contaminated areas on active and former military installations. (gao.gov)
  • cause
  • Salt well pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. (unt.edu)
  • less
  • The CEM is a higher priority message than the Local Area Emergency (LAE), but the hazard is less specific then the Civil Danger Warning (CDW). (weather.gov)