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  • Robert Bunsen
  • Cesium was discovered in 1861 by German chemists Robert Bunsen (1811-99) and Gustav Kirchhoff (1824-87). (encyclopedia.com)
  • The German chemist Robert Bunsen and physicist Gustav Kirchhoff discovered caesium in 1860 by the newly developed method of flame spectroscopy . (wikipedia.org)
  • reactor
  • the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR) used approximately 130 tonnes of NaK, and shut down in 1977, while the larger Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) used around 900 tonnes of sodium and shut down in 1994. (neimagazine.com)
  • Each atomic reactor produces the radioactive equivalent of hundreds of pounds of radium. (pitzer.edu)
  • Radioactive iodine may enter the environment during a nuclear reactor accident and find its way into the food chain. (idahoeser.com)
  • The Nuclear Regulatory Commission relies upon self-reporting and computer modeling from reactor operators to track radioactive releases and their projected dispersion. (riverkeeper.org)
  • About 5 percent of the reactor core actually went up into the air and was carried along the jet stream, allowing the radioactive material to spread across Europe. (popularmechanics.com)
  • wastes
  • Solid radioactive wastes include laundry (considered low-level waste) and irradiated spent fuel (considered high-level waste. (riverkeeper.org)
  • Nevertheless, nuclear power proponents claim that the technology of nuclear power plant construction and of the disposal of radioactive wastes has markedly improved, and should now alleviate most concerns. (monthlyreview.org)
  • In order for nuclear power to make a dent in the global warming problem it would be necessary to build hundreds of nuclear power plants around the world, each one taking ten years to construct, and each an enormous hazard to the earth, generating radioactive wastes lasting for hundreds or thousands or millions of years. (monthlyreview.org)
  • Compounds
  • Nonradioactive caesium compounds are only mildly toxic , but the pure metal's tendency to react explosively with water means that caesium is considered a hazardous material, and the radioisotopes present a significant health and ecological hazard in the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pollution
  • This gives a reason, but not an excuse, for underrating the significance of public concerns about radioactive pollution in the quest for military superiority or near-limitless sources of electric power. (scienceforpeace.ca)
  • earthquake
  • The Great East Japan Earthquake of magnitude 9.0 at 2.46 pm on Friday 11 March 2011 did considerable damage in the region, and the large tsunami it created caused very much more. (world-nuclear.org)
  • atomic
  • In keeping with its policy of more openness, the USSR sent a large delegation, led by Dr. Viktor Mikhailov, the Deputy Minister for Atomic Energy and Industry, and its members are generally quite open in their descriptions of their underground testing practices. (scienceforpeace.ca)
  • Caesium (IUPAC spelling ) or cesium (American spelling) [note is a chemical element with symbol Cs and atomic number 55. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since then, caesium has been widely used in highly accurate atomic clocks . (wikipedia.org)
  • hazardous
  • Because of the presence of radioactive material (and because those needy cancer patients wouldn't quit their bitching), it was decided that the machine was to be sent to a nuclear facility 130 miles away to be disposed of properly, because step one in disposing of wildly hazardous material is to parade it across the entire countryside. (fourwinds10.com)
  • Waste
  • Green burst' and 'criticality event' under investigation by gov't in connection with plutonium release at U.S. nuclear site #WIPP - Official: Underground fire may have initiated reaction in ruptured radioactive waste drum - Concern over possible arson/sabotage? (enenews.com)
  • And, they occur throughout the nuclear fuel cycle, which includes uranium mining, uranium milling, chemical conversion, fuel enrichment and fabrication, the process by which electricity is generated at plant via controlled reaction, and the storage of radioactive waste, both on-site and off-site. (riverkeeper.org)
  • Way back in 1941, when nuclear weapons and nuclear power were first seriously proposed to the British and American governments, the order of priorities was bombs first, power production second, and concern about radioactive waste products a long way down the list. (scienceforpeace.ca)
  • During fuel reprocessing, it appears in the waste liquid, which is highly radioactive. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Chemistry
  • Since the 1990s, the largest application of the element has been as caesium formate for drilling fluids , but it has a range of applications in the production of electricity, in electronics, and in chemistry. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemical
  • Smallest amount of an element which can exist independently and still retain the chemical properties of that element. (angelfire.com)
  • materials
  • To an ardent greenie, nuclear free means a prohibition of anything involving radioactive materials, even banning the transport of radiopharmaceuticals for use in medical treatment. (scribd.com)
  • A significant part of the initial dispersal of radioactive materials has now dissipated. (sc.edu)
  • They discovered that radioactive materials produce intense, penetrating rays of three distinct sorts, which they labeled alpha, beta, and gamma after the first three Greek letters . (wikipedia.org)
  • This can be through eating foods that contain radioactive materials. (preparedbee.com)
  • risks
  • Anything we can do to help refine predictions of these risks will be of great interest and potential importance for people living in the face of nuclear hazards. (sc.edu)
  • gamma
  • When the beta particle ejection doesn't rid the nucleus of the extra energy, the nucleus releases the remaining excess energy in the form of a gamma photon. (idahoeser.com)
  • nucleus
  • Nuclear fission is the splitting of the nucleus of a large atom into two or more parts, and was first demonstrated in an explosive device in 1945 with the Trinity test, which yielded 21 kilotons. (michaellight.net)
  • It is impossible to predict when a particular nucleus will disintegrate, but when observing a large number belonging to the same nuclide (kind of nucleus), the number of intact ones will decrease exponentially. (rationalwiki.org)