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  • regulate
  • Perivascular stromal cells such as NG2 + periarteriolar cells and LepR + perisinusoidal stromal cells differentially regulate HSCs. (frontiersin.org)
  • Since transcriptional regulators are frequently deregulated or mutated in hematopoietic malignancies, our current focus is to understand how transcription factors and transcription factor networks regulate quiescence, self-renewal and cell specification using mouse models, normal stem cells, and stem cell line models. (cancer.gov)
  • These findings show that integrin β3 signaling intensifies the suppressive effect of IFNγ on HSCs, which indicates that cell adhesion via integrin αvβ3 within the BM niche acts as a context‐dependent signal modulator to regulate the HSC function under both steady‐state and inflammatory conditions. (embopress.org)
  • Her current research is focused on the mechanisms that regulate hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), and how those regulatory mechanisms go awry in hematologic malignancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brain macrophages (microglia) can regulate the number of neural precursor cells in the developing brain by phagocytosing these otherwise viable precursors and thus limiting neurogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, MSI1 and MSI2 regulate the multiplication and maintenance of a specific group inside of neural precursors cells: CNS (central neural system) stem cells populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • It must balance enormous production needs (more than 500 billion blood cells are produced every day) with the need to precisely regulate the number of each blood cell type in the circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • TGFβ The TGFβ family of cytokines regulate the stemness of both normal and cancer stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • cytokines
  • The role of cytokines in regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remains poorly understood. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Angiopoietin cytokines are involved with controlling microvascular permeability, vasodilation, and vasoconstriction by signaling smooth muscle cells surrounding vessels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, B cells present antigen (they are also classified as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs)) and secrete cytokines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following TCR-MHC-II-peptide binding, T cells express the surface protein CD40L as well as cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-21. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells that have the capacity to release soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors which act in a paracrine or endocrine manner. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • CDK drives the cell through the cell cycle by chemical modification (phosphorylation) of other proteins. (edu.au)
  • The laboratory is currently defining the physiological function of the inhibitor of DNA binding (Id) family of proteins in self-renewal, quiescence and cell fate determination. (cancer.gov)
  • Phagoptosis is normally caused by: the cell exposing on its surface so-called "eat-me" signals, and/or the cell no longer exposing "don't-eat-me" signals and/or the cell being opsonised i.e. binding soluble proteins that tag the cell for phagocytosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Opsonins are normally soluble proteins, which when bound to the surface of a cell induce phagocytes to phagocytose that cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is believed that the molecular distinction between symmetric and asymmetric divisions lies in differential segregation of cell membrane proteins (such as receptors) between the daughter cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • B cell activation is enhanced through the activity of CD21, a surface receptor in complex with surface proteins CD19 and CD81 (all three are collectively known as the B cell coreceptor complex). (wikipedia.org)
  • Antigens that activate B cells with the help of T-cell are known as T cell-dependent (TD) antigens and include foreign proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • These changes can often be tracked by monitoring the presence of proteins on the surface of the cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • it can also be involved in cell to cell transfer of GPI anchored proteins like CD55 and CD59. (wikipedia.org)
  • CD34
  • OB ablation resulted in increase in cells with a LSK Flt3 − CD150 + CD48 − long-term HSC (LTHSC) phenotype but reduction of a more highly selected LSK Flt3 − CD34 − CD49b − CD229 − LTHSC subpopulation. (bloodjournal.org)
  • CD34 is also an important adhesion molecule and is required for T cells to enter lymph nodes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conversely, under other circumstances CD34 has been shown to act as molecular "Teflon" and block mast cell, eosinophil and dendritic cell precursor adhesion, and to facilitate opening of vascular lumina. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finally, recent data suggest CD34 may also play a more selective role in chemokine-dependent migration of eosinophils and dendritic cell precursors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regardless of its mode of action, under all circumstances CD34, and its relatives podocalyxin and endoglycan, facilitates cell migration. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Human HSCs express the CD34 marker. (wikipedia.org)
  • Processes
  • VSV entered a host cell as a single negative strand of RNA, but brought with it RNA polymerase to stimulate the processes of transcription and replication of more RNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thy-1 can be used as a marker for a variety of stem cells and for the axonal processes of mature neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • senescence
  • Replicative senescence is the phenomenon by which cells undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest, loosing the ability to divide and proliferate. (frontiersin.org)
  • It is clear that otherwise-viable cells can expose/bind such phagocytosis-promoting signals as a result of cell stress, activation or senescence. (wikipedia.org)
  • During mammalian development multiple cells undergo programmed cell senescence and are then phagocytosed by macrophages. (wikipedia.org)
  • findings
  • These findings broadly support the regulation of chromatin ubiquitination as a key pathway in preserving tissue function through modulation of the response to genotoxic stress. (mdc-berlin.de)
  • These findings suggest that NHEJ is a key determinant of the ability of HSCs to maintain themselves over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • steady-state
  • To maintain a steady-state pool of self-renewing HSCs and prevent HSC exhaustion, these defining properties of HSCs must be tightly regulated. (rupress.org)
  • molecular
  • Animal-free Recombinant Human TPO is expressed from human 293 cells as a monomeric glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of 80 to 85 kDa. (ptglab.com)
  • Paul Nurse (born 1949), Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London, identified, cloned and characterized with genetic and molecular methods, one of the key regulators of the cell cycle, CDK (cyclin dependent kinase). (edu.au)
  • Through this molecular mechanism, MSI2 contributes in more than one vital aspect, as in the development of the nervous system, regulation of the Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, or the self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • isolate
  • To eradicate AML without killing normal HSCs, it is critical to isolate a target that is expressed or functions specifically at the LIC stage, or to identify a signalling pathway that, when targeted, has a neutral or beneficial effect on normal cells while being harmful to AML LICs. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • She is best known for her discovery of a novel method to isolate adult stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • whereas
  • It is expressed on lymph node endothelia, whereas the L-selectin to which it binds is on the T cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulatory
  • Also acts as an important cell cycle regulator, participating in cell cycle regulatory network machinery at multiple cell cycle stages including G1/S transition, S phase progression and mitotic entry (PubMed:14718661, PubMed:18573682, PubMed:19264965, PubMed:23629655). (genecards.org)
  • We and others have reported that Evi1 accomplishes an important regulatory function in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) during fetal and adult development. (rupress.org)
  • CD47 interacts with signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), an inhibitory transmembrane receptor present on myeloid cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • Beyond the hematopoietic system, Usp3{delta}/{delta} animals spontaneously developed tumors, and primary Usp3{delta}/{delta} cells failed to preserve chromosomal integrity. (mdc-berlin.de)
  • Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are cancer cells (found within tumors or hematological cancers) that possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells, specifically the ability to give rise to all cell types found in a particular cancer sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such cells are hypothesized to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cancer stem cell model, also known as the Hierarchical Model proposes that tumors are hierarchically organized (CSCs lying at the apex (Fig. 3). (wikipedia.org)
  • Within the cancer population of the tumors there are cancer stem cells (CSC) that are tumorigenic cells and are biologically distinct from other subpopulations They have two defining features: their long-term ability to self-renew and their capacity to differentiate into progeny that is non-tumorigenic but still contributes to the growth of the tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • long-term
  • DNA strand breaks accumulate in long term HSCs during aging. (wikipedia.org)
  • This model suggests that only certain subpopulations of cancer stem cells have the ability to drive the progression of cancer, meaning that there are specific (intrinsic) characteristics that can be identified and then targeted to destroy a tumor long-term without the need to battle the whole tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • novel
  • Old erythrocytes do not die, but rather display changes in the cell surface that enable macrophages to recognise them as old or damaged, including exposure of phosphatidylserine, desialylation of glycoproteins, loss or changed conformation of the "don't-eat-me" signal CD47, and exposure of novel antigens that bind endogenous antibodies. (wikipedia.org)