Loading...
  • Regrow Limbs
  • The short synopsis of my reading of this article is simply that by activating a gene that goes back to early evolution, we may be able to regrow limbs like Sponges, worms, or Starfish. (thinkatheist.com)
  • But maybe 20 years from now, we'll be able to have people born with the ability to regrow limbs, and that's a win for science. (thinkatheist.com)
  • embryonic
  • By comparing cells from the regeneration blastema with embryonic pluripotent reference cells we found that induced pluripotent stem and blastema cells do not share pluripotency. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Then various specialized cells at the site, such as bone, skin, and blood cells, lose their identity and revert to cells as unspecialized as those in the embryonic limb bud. (petersons.com)
  • abilities
  • David Stocum of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis said it could help explain why mammals have limited regrowth abilities and thus help direct the field of regenerative medicine. (yahoo.com)
  • No other animal can match their regenerative abilities in body parts including the limbs, the tail and spinal cord, parts of the eye (such as the retina and the lens), the brain, the heart and the jaws. (qubitsnews.com)
  • Understanding the 'tricks' used by animals like Hydractinia to regenerate may help translate these abilities to regenerative medicine. (elifesciences.org)
  • larval stage
  • The transgenic newt embryos were then reared until the swimming larval stage, at 3 months of age, or the metamorphosed juvenile stage, at 16 months. (qubitsnews.com)
  • pluripotent
  • We therefore propose a link between partially reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells and the half way state of blastema cells and suggest that a common mechanism might be regulating these two processes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The finding discredits a popular theory that holds that previously specialized cells regress, or dedifferentiate, in response to injury to form a pluripotent repair structure called a blastema. (blogspot.com)
  • In contrast, the blastema theory invokes a new pluripotent cell type formed out of urgency from previously specialized cells. (blogspot.com)
  • This finding changes the current dogma of limb regeneration, from pluripotent blastema cells to tissue-specific stem and progenitor cells," said Rinkevich. (blogspot.com)
  • progenitors
  • Together, the data suggest that rather than inducing proliferation of mature cells, developmental pathways are reinstated, and that a pool of naïve progenitors at the blastema site forms the basis for this regeneration. (bioportfolio.com)
  • amphibians
  • In amphibians this process is regulated by nerve fibres present at the site of injury, which have been proposed to release factors into the amputated limbs/fins, promoting and sustaining the proliferation of blastemal cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Unlike typical mammals, which heal wounds by forming a scar, these mice begin by forming a blastema, a structure associated with rapid cell growth and de-differentiation as seen in amphibians. (thinkatheist.com)
  • genes
  • In the study, the researchers constructed a database of all the protein-coding genes from the Japanese fire-bellied newt that had been reported in the Japan newt research community. (eurekalert.org)
  • Eggs are large and can now be manipulated genetically, permitting the interrogation of specific genes in regenerative processes. (capeia.com)
  • Through this method, a comparison between a regeneration blastema in levels of differentiated expressed genes. (inquiriesjournal.com)
  • digits
  • The proposed studies address one of the most pressing needs of the wounded soldier population: the replacement of lost digits and limbs. (pitt.edu)
  • Such injuries - the partial or complete loss of digits or limbs and deforming facial injuries - have profoundly affected the quality of life of the wounded as well as presented a new set of challenges for the medical community faced with treating them. (medgadget.com)
  • proliferation
  • Studying the hydrozoan Hydractinia echinata we show that a burst of stem cell proliferation occurs following decapitation, forming a blastema at the oral pole within 24 hr. (elifesciences.org)
  • analyses
  • We have found that pseudotyped Maloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MMLV) retroviruses can very efficiently infect axolotl cells in vitro and in vivo , and can be used for both lineage and functional analyses in regenerating limbs. (biologists.org)
  • protein turnover analyses of the resulting regenerative process. (bioportfolio.com)
  • gene expression
  • Systemic macrophage depletion during this period resulted in wound closure but permanent failure of limb regeneration, associated with extensive fibrosis and disregulation of extracellular matrix component gene expression. (pnas.org)
  • functional
  • Functional analysis of chick heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferases in limb bud development. (springer.com)
  • These stem cells then created a bud (known as a blastema) that developed into a new, fully functional head within two days, allowing the animals to capture prey. (elifesciences.org)
  • deviation
  • Inhibition and axial deviation of limb regeneration in the newt by means of a digit implanted into the amputated limb Supported by grants from the Damon Runyan Foundation and the Muscular Dystrophy Association. (umich.edu)
  • stem cells
  • In effect, newts are able to manipulate their bodies by turning cells into undifferentiated stem cells and then back into mature tissue again. (yahoo.com)
  • We've shown conclusively that what was thought to be a blastema is instead simply resident stem cells that are already committed to become specific tissue types," said Irving Weissman , MD, director of Stanford's Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine . (blogspot.com)
  • protein
  • To understand its function, the researchers investigated where and when the Newtic1 protein is expressed in the newt. (eurekalert.org)
  • We screened the blastema of resected axolotl limbs with a cross-reactive mouse cytokine protein detection array, revealing a rapid induction of cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory markers within 1 d of limb resection. (pnas.org)
  • Now new research by a British team published on Thursday shows that a protein called nAG, secreted by nerve and skin cells, plays a central role in producing a clump of immature cells, known as a blastema, which regrows the missing part. (yahoo.com)
  • The gene was linked to a red fluorescent protein which could be switched on and off at precise times with the addition of a particular chemical to the rearing solution.Selected transgenic newts had a limb removed under anesthesia. (qubitsnews.com)
  • medicine
  • Most recently, tissue engineering pioneer Dr. Anthony Atala and his team at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine announced another breakthrough: lab-made vaginas one of the most complex organs made to date. (freerepublic.com)
  • LONDON (Reuters) - British scientists have for the first time used regenerative medicine to fully restore an organ in a living animal, a discovery they say may pave the way for similar techniques to be used in humans in future. (freerepublic.com)
  • The research is particularly meaningful because some scientists and national media reports have championed the idea that money allotted by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine for stem cell studies would have been better funneled to blastema research, Weissman said. (blogspot.com)
  • The emerging importance of regenerative medicine has reinvigorated investigations of innate tissue. (bioportfolio.com)