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  • 2002
  • In 2002, a bizarre sect of spaceship-worshipping Raelians claimed that "Baby Eve," the clone, had already been born. (whyfiles.org)
  • Food and Drug Administration, U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, Workshop on Evidence Based Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) (Washington, D.C. September 18, 2002), available from http://www.fda.gov/cber/minutes/art091802.pdf (accessed February 5, 2008). (lifeissues.net)
  • organs
  • Regenerative medicine generally refers to using cells and genes to artificially create tissues and organs and then transplanting them to regenerate physiological functions in patients. (childresearch.net)
  • Aaron Levine, a bioethicist at Georgia Tech, said that the biggest impact of cloning on human health is likely to come from animals raised to produce organs, tissue or biological drugs that will not be rejected by the human immune system. (medindia.net)
  • Researchers are using reproductive cloning to genetically change pigs so their organs would escape immune attack after transplant into humans. (whyfiles.org)
  • nucleus
  • They then inject the nucleus of the donor cell (or sometimes a whole cell) into the enucleated egg and incubate it under special conditions that prompt it to divide and grow [see Therapeutic Cloning: How It's Done ]. (scientificamerican.com)
  • This is defined as 'the practice of creating or attempting to create a human being by transferring the nucleus from a human cell into an egg cell from which the nucleus has been removed for the purpose of implanting the resulting product in a uterus to initiate a pregnancy. (freerepublic.com)
  • sheep
  • But besides being illegal, successfully producing a human clone is more complex than producing a monkey clone (just as producing a monkey clone was far more complex than producing a sheep clone). (singularityhub.com)
  • On the farm, cloning breeds more productive cows , faster horses, sheep with better wool. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • In 1984 Sabine Meinecke-Tillmann and Burkhard Meinecke published their article "Experimental Chimeras - Removal of Reproductive Barrier Between Sheep and Goat" in Nature. (asu.edu)
  • Their article appeared in Nature on the same day that a similar experiment, conducted by Carole Fehilly, Steen Willadsen, and Elizabeth Tucker was published regarding reproductive barriers between sheep and goats. (asu.edu)
  • They reported their results in the article 'Sheep Cloned by Nuclear Transfer from a Cultured Cell Line' in March 1996. (asu.edu)
  • Researchers
  • However, most researchers believe that in the foreseeable future it will not be possible to use this technique to produce a human clone that will develop to term. (bootstrike.com)
  • 1997
  • Council of Research, Technology, and Innovation, German Research Foundation, Cloning of Humans: Biological Foundations and Ethico-legal Assessment , (April 1997), available from http://www.dfg.de/aktuelles_presse/reden_stellungnahmen/archiv/download/klonierung_beim_menschen_97e.pdf (accessed February 5, 2008). (lifeissues.net)
  • cells
  • From Embryonic Stem Cells to Human Cloning: How has Assisted Reproductive Medicine Changed Regenerative Medicine? (childresearch.net)
  • The Nobel-capped discovery is the new focus in regenerative medicine focused, though the jury is out as to whether IP stem cells work as well as embryonic ones. (medindia.net)
  • But using cloning technology to clone human cells does not create a new human being. (bio.org)
  • These are not cells or products that could ever develop into a human being, even if implanted in a uterus. (bio.org)
  • Cloning of human cells has numerous applications in medical research that may lead to cures and treatments for diseases and disabilities such as diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, various types of cancer, heart disease, and spinal cord injury. (bio.org)
  • Regenerative medicine - This technology holds the potential to cause an individual's currently malfunctioning cells to begin to function properly again or even to replace dead or irreparably damaged cells with fresh healthy ones, thereby restoring organ function. (bio.org)
  • Cloning technology is used to create pure populations of functional new cells that can replace damaged cells in the body. (bio.org)
  • Thus far, these human replacement cells appear to function normally in vitro, raising the possibility for their application in the treatment of devastating chronic diseases affecting these tissue types. (bio.org)
  • Predictive Toxicology - Cloning of cells is also used as a research tool to facilitate the safe development of new drugs. (bio.org)
  • The use of normal, cloned human liver cells to test new drugs under development for certain toxic metabolites, for example, would reduce the danger of human clinical trials by eliminating such compounds before human testing. (bio.org)
  • Alissa Johnson, senior policy specialist for NCSL , said bills that address human cloning are a continuing trend but lately more measures are tackling the issue of stem cells directly. (pewtrusts.org)
  • The monkeys were cloned using fetal connective tissue cells called fibroblasts . (singularityhub.com)
  • But cloning to produce stem cells? (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Long before Dolly's somewhat premature death, embryonic stem cells joined cloning as emblems of a brave new reproductive future. (whyfiles.org)
  • Because these cells can grow into any body cell, therapeutic cloning might lead to genetically matched spare parts that do not trigger an immune response. (whyfiles.org)
  • The next step was to recruit women willing to contribute eggs to be used in the cloning procedure and also collect cells from individuals to be cloned (the donors). (scientificamerican.com)
  • And the debate is not confined to cloning of cells, but also includes concerns over health care, how resources are used, who has access to the latest developments and how the health care system is going to pay for making new applications broadly available. (natcath.org)
  • Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. (pnas.org)
  • In cell biology, it is the propagation of a progenitor cell to obtain a population of genetically identical cells whereas, in animal biology, cloning refers to the production of genetic copies of individual animals using nuclear transfer. (pnas.org)
  • South Korea 's reputation as a leader in stem cell research suffered a significant blow in 2006 when it was discovered that the country's leading biomedical researcher, Dr. Hwang Woo-suk, falsely claimed that he was the first scientist to clone human embryonic stem cells for the purpose of clinical trials. (pewforum.org)
  • Diagram of the ways to reprogram cells along with the development of humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term is generally used to refer to artificial human cloning, which is the reproduction of human cells and tissue . (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic cloning would involve cloning cells from a human for use in medicine and transplants, and is an active area of research, but is not in medical practice anywhere in the world, as of May 2019 [update] . (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2004 and 2005, Hwang Woo-suk , a professor at Seoul National University , published two separate articles in the journal Science claiming to have successfully harvested pluripotent, embryonic stem cells from a cloned human blastocyst using somatic-cell nuclear transfer techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • Twentieth-century researcher Ernest John Christopher Polge studied the reproductive processes of livestock and determined a method to successfully freeze, thaw, and utilize viable sperm cells to produce offspring in animals. (asu.edu)
  • Mitochondrial diseases in humans result when the small organelles called mitochondria, which exist in all human cells, fail to function normally. (asu.edu)
  • Dr. Harrell is the owner and chief consultant of Harrell BioScience Consulting, and Associate Professor of Regenerative Medicine at UCF College of Medicine, and a faculty member for Global Stem Cells Training, Inc. (bitcongress.com)
  • Stem cell-derived human germ cells stay in the headlines. (ipscell.com)
  • Methods to reprogram normal body cells into pluripotent stem cells were developed in humans in 2007. (bootstrike.com)
  • However they are rarer and difficult to identify amongst the crowded somatic cells, and do not survive long enough outside the human body for potential therapeutic use. (edu.au)
  • The research shows it is possible to derive embryonic stem cells from primates, including humans. (edu.au)
  • Michael Shamblott's group at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine used primordial germ cells from aborted fetuses. (edu.au)
  • proteins
  • Animals can also be cloned to produce proteins for human therapeutic use such as human antibodies, allowing for large-scale production of human vaccines. (bio.org)
  • Consideration of animals will include potential use of transgenic insects for crop protection strategies, the use of transgenic and cloned animals for food production and agriculture, and use of transgenic animals for producing pharmaceutical proteins. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • It also has been shown recently that all the lines tested contained mouse proteins on their surface which causes them to be rejected by the immune system in a human. (quizover.com)
  • Bioethics
  • Years earlier, in October of 1995, Clinton had established the National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC) in light of bioethical concerns over research on humans. (scribd.com)
  • research
  • Cloning of Zika virus is a breakthrough in vaccine research and therapeutics against the disease. (medindia.net)
  • Arkansas, Iowa, Michigan and North Dakota prohibit research on cloned embryos. (pewtrusts.org)
  • Shoukhrat Mitalipov of the University of Oregon was the first to succeed in making a human stem cell line for research into therapy development. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • As stated in Executive Order 12975 by which the NBAC was organized, the purpose of this Commission was to recommend regulations on "bioethical issues arising from research on human biology and behaviour. (scribd.com)
  • ban all federal funding for cloning research as well as asking for a temporary voluntary moratorium on cloning research by private institutions until more could be learned about the issue. (scribd.com)
  • Obviously his research failed, but, no doubt at the expense of many human embryos. (scribd.com)
  • The main argument for why cloning research should be continued is the possible benefits it can have. (scribd.com)
  • Stem cell research and therapeutic cloning: an update. (springer.com)
  • If successful, his campaign would essentially shut down any human genetic bioscience research efforts in Missouri. (natcath.org)
  • In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research. (pnas.org)
  • In 2007, the Indian government's biomedical oversight body, the Council for Medical Research, banned reproductive cloning but voted to permit therapeutic cloning. (pewforum.org)
  • Despite the scandal, the South Korean government continues to promote therapeutic cloning for stem cell research, although reproductive cloning is forbidden. (pewforum.org)
  • Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly, Recommendation 1100 (1989):On the Use of Human Embryos and Foetuses in Scientific Research (1989), available from http://assembly.coe.int/Main.asp?link=/Documents/AdoptedText/ta89/EREC1100.htm (accessed February 5, 2008). (lifeissues.net)
  • German National Ethics Council, Cloning for Reproductive Purposes and Cloning for the Purposes of Biomedical Research (Berlin 2004), available from http://www.ethikrat.org/_english/publications/Opinion_Cloning.pdf (accessed February 5, 2008). (lifeissues.net)
  • He began his career in biomedical technological and translational research in regenerative medicine, bone marrow and stem cell biology, molecular and behavioral investigations of sleep problems in patients with autism spectrum disorders, infectious disease agents and the autonomic nervous system. (bitcongress.com)
  • The initiative would fund any research or therapy involving human cloning as long as it is not what it calls 'human reproductive cloning. (freerepublic.com)
  • Fertilisation
  • Department of Health and Social Security, Select Committee on Science and Technology, "Report of the Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertilisation and Embryology" Warnock Report , Cmnd 9314 (July 1984): 4, 27, 63. (lifeissues.net)
  • sperm
  • In a similar experiment, however, we succeeded in prompting human eggson their own, with no sperm to fertilize themto develop parthenogenetically into blastocysts. (scientificamerican.com)
  • According to the definitions included in the bill, Clone a human being or cloning a human being, shall mean the creation of a human being by any means other than by the fertilization of a naturally intact oocyte of a human female by a naturally intact sperm of a human male. (natcath.org)
  • Atlas of Fine Structure of Human Sperm Penetration, Eggs, and Embryos Cultured in Vitro. (wikipedia.org)