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  • Chemical
  • Ellman's reagent (5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) or DTNB ) is a chemical used to quantify the number or concentration of thiol groups in a sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • The limiting reagent is needed to calculate the percentage yield of a chemical reaction's product. (reference.com)
  • In organic chemistry, the term "reagent" denotes a chemical ingredient (a compound or mixture, typically of inorganic or small organic molecules) introduced to cause a desired transformation of an organic substance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Purity standards for reagents are set by organizations such as ASTM International or the American Chemical Society. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the field of biology, the biotechnology revolution in the 1980s grew from the development of reagents that could be used to identify and manipulate the chemical matter in and on cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Schwartz's reagent is the common name for the chemical compound with the formula (C5H5)2ZrHCl, sometimes called zirconocene hydrochloride or zirconocene chloride hydride, and is named after Jeffrey Schwartz, a chemistry professor at Princeton University. (wikipedia.org)
  • Schweizer's reagent is the chemical complex tetraamminediaquacopper dihydroxide, [Cu(NH3)4(H2O)OH)2. (wikipedia.org)
  • distinguish
  • Laboratory products which are less pure, but still useful and economical for undemanding work, may be designated as technical, practical, or crude grade to distinguish them from reagent versions. (wikipedia.org)
  • thiols
  • Ellman's reagent can be used for measuring low-molecular mass thiols such as glutathione in both pure solutions and biological samples, such as blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • testing methods
  • Follow up of patients during and after treatment with the sensitive FLAER reagent has a great advantage over the traditional PNH testing methods. (prweb.com)
  • Targets
  • The procedure below is based on the TransMessenger Reagent standard procedure and RNAi studies using targets described by Elbashir et al. (bio-medicine.org)