Loading...
  • tissues
  • This database contained DNA sequence information of genes from 19 different tissues, including different regenerating organs and limb blastemas. (eurekalert.org)
  • Its existence in newt tissues was confirmed using both DNA- and protein-based methods. (eurekalert.org)
  • By looking at the expression of Newtic1 in larval newt tissues and limb blastemas, the researchers determined that Newtic1-expressing erythrocytes do not contribute to the limb blastema in the larval stage. (eurekalert.org)
  • These cells lose their specialised adult traits and revert to a more embryonic stem-like state, where they're capable to producing the various tissues of the lost limb. (discovermagazine.com)
  • After the limb or tail has been autotomized, cells move into action and the tissues will regenerate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regenerative medicine is a growing area of research, with much of it centered on stem cells, the master cells that act as a source for various cells and tissues in the body. (yahoo.com)
  • these cells have the ability to become one of several kinds of mature cell, and often help to repair and grow tissues. (elifesciences.org)
  • Dedifferentiation of stump tissues, such as skeletal muscle, precedes blastema formation, but it was not known whether dedifferentiation involves stem cell activation. (rupress.org)
  • We demonstrate that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation involves satellite cell activation and that these cells can contribute to new limb tissues. (rupress.org)
  • It is unclear to what extent differentiated cells reverse mature phenotypes and to what extent undifferentiated cells, such as stem cells, residing within differentiated tissues become activated, followed by their incorporation into the blastema. (rupress.org)
  • By employing model organisms such as zebrafish and mouse and extending discoveries to human cells and tissues, we hope to gain fundamental insight that can be translated into clinical advances, most notably solving the structural and reconstructive problems of the limbs, face, and head, whether congenital or acquired. (ucsf.edu)
  • Epimorphic regeneration results in the restoration of lost tissues and structures from an aggregation of proliferating cells known as a blastema. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After blastema formation, a period of extensive proliferation of blastema cells follows, before the cells re-differentiate to produce all the different cell types for the tissues of the missing appendage. (biomedcentral.com)
  • known as a blastema
  • Now new research by a British team published on Thursday shows that a protein called nAG, secreted by nerve and skin cells, plays a central role in producing a clump of immature cells, known as a blastema, which regrows the missing part. (yahoo.com)
  • These stem cells then created a bud (known as a blastema) that developed into a new, fully functional head within two days, allowing the animals to capture prey. (elifesciences.org)
  • formation
  • To identify genes related to limb regeneration, they used statistical analyses to look for genes whose expression was increased in association with the formation of the limb blastema. (eurekalert.org)
  • One of the major hurdles to human regeneration of say, a digit, is the formation and maintenance of a blastema," says Seifert. (discovermagazine.com)
  • A clear understanding of the molecular signals involved in blastema formation and limb regeneration could eventually allow medics to program similar patterns into cells of non-regenerating body parts. (yahoo.com)
  • Knocking down Piwi1 , Vasa , Pl10 or Ncol1 expressed by blastema cells inhibited regeneration but not blastema formation. (elifesciences.org)
  • EdU pulse-chase experiments and in vivo tracking of individual transgenic Piwi1 + stem cells showed that the cellular source for blastema formation is migration of stem cells from a remote area. (elifesciences.org)
  • Fibroblasts are essential for salamander regeneration, but the mechanisms underlying their role in the formation of a regeneration blastema remain unclear. (jcancer.org)
  • Although other cell types contribute to blastema formation, fibroblasts appear to play a central role [ 5 , 6 ]. (jcancer.org)
  • Neurons are now known to be involved in the complex interactions between the formation of cancers, inflammation, and wound healing, and limb regeneration. (jonlieffmd.com)
  • Limb regeneration depends on the formation of a blastema, from which the new appendage develops. (rupress.org)
  • Our findings also identify satellite cells as potential targets in promoting mammalian blastema formation. (rupress.org)
  • Epimorphic limb regeneration proceeds by rapid wound closure and is critically dependent on the formation of a multipotent mesenchymal growth zone, the blastema, which gives rise to the newly formed limb ( Wallace, 1981 ). (rupress.org)
  • This process is generally referred to as the dedifferentiation step leading to the formation of blastema progenitors ( Iten and Bryant, 1973 ). (rupress.org)
  • Skeletal muscle is an important contributor to blastema formation ( Brockes, 1997 ). (rupress.org)
  • Upon denervation fins were able to close the wound and form a wound epidermis, but could not establish a functional apical epithelial cap, with a posterior failure of blastema formation and outgrowth, and the accumulation of several defects. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Beginning with the formation of a cellular aggregation (reportedly a blastema), these lizards are able to develop a replacement appendage that, at least superficially, resembles the original, complete with nerves, blood vessels and skeletal support. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, during blastema formation some of the key reprogramming factors are both expressed and are also required for regeneration to take place. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Each model offers different opportunities and techniques that add to the general picture of blastema cell formation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • proliferation
  • Studying the hydrozoan Hydractinia echinata we show that a burst of stem cell proliferation occurs following decapitation, forming a blastema at the oral pole within 24 hr. (elifesciences.org)
  • In amphibians this process is regulated by nerve fibres present at the site of injury, which have been proposed to release factors into the amputated limbs/fins, promoting and sustaining the proliferation of blastemal cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • pluripotent
  • In contrast, the blastema theory invokes a new pluripotent cell type formed out of urgency from previously specialized cells. (blogspot.com)
  • By comparing cells from the regeneration blastema with embryonic pluripotent reference cells we found that induced pluripotent stem and blastema cells do not share pluripotency. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We therefore propose a link between partially reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells and the half way state of blastema cells and suggest that a common mechanism might be regulating these two processes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • stem
  • The research is particularly meaningful because some scientists and national media reports have championed the idea that money allotted by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine for stem cell studies would have been better funneled to blastema research, Weissman said. (blogspot.com)
  • Reducing the activity of certain stem cell genes prevented the new head from growing, but the bud still formed. (elifesciences.org)
  • skeletal
  • We describe a multipotent Pax7 + satellite cell population located within the skeletal muscle of the salamander limb. (rupress.org)
  • While skeletal evolution has been extensively studied, the evolution of limb muscles and brachial plexus has received less attention. (biomedcentral.com)
  • cells
  • There they dedifferentiate - revert to a less specialized state similar to embryonic cells - and form the bud of a new limb, called a blastema. (baynature.org)
  • As the blastema cells multiply, they grow into the outline of a new limb and once again differentiate into fibroblasts, muscle, bone, etc. (baynature.org)
  • The blastema is a mass of undifferentiated cells -- much like the cells of an embryo -- which have the ability to change into skin, bone and vascular cells, as needed. (viewzone.com)
  • Within seconds the wound clots and is sealed as cells covering the tiny heart rapidly grow to encase the chamber. (viewzone.com)
  • This gene is expressed in a subset of red blood cells and may contribute to limb regeneration in adult newts. (eurekalert.org)
  • But spiny mice not only heal ear holes, but they'll re-grow the different layers of skin, hair follicles, fat cells, muscles and cartilage. (discovermagazine.com)
  • As the tip of an amputated digit re-grows, strict separations between the contributions of individual cells are apparent as distinct bands of color. (blogspot.com)
  • Recent research shows signaling conversations between the neurons and blastema cells as well as neurons and cancer cells. (jonlieffmd.com)
  • and it has remained unsettled whether adult newts possess a cellular population that is equal to mammalian satellite cells. (rupress.org)
  • An additional aggregation of proliferating cells accumulates adjacent to the distal tip of the severed spinal cord marking the first appearance of the blastema. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However these factors were not upregulated during regeneration as would be expected if blastema cells acquired pluripotency. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After the loss of an appendage undifferentiated, pluri- or multipotent cells from different origins accumulate at the damaged surface to form a regeneration blastema. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Despite the heterogeneous origin of the blastema cells, histologically they appear as a homogeneous population of cells and therefore have been traditionally viewed as a single cell type. (biomedcentral.com)
  • But evidence is growing that there is a method to the madness of tumor cells, making some scientists reevaluate the nature of cancer. (blogspot.com)
  • digits
  • Such injuries - the partial or complete loss of digits or limbs and deforming facial injuries - have profoundly affected the quality of life of the wounded as well as presented a new set of challenges for the medical community faced with treating them. (medgadget.com)
  • The proposed studies address one of the most pressing needs of the wounded soldier population: the replacement of lost digits and limbs. (pitt.edu)
  • humans
  • Already, lab-grown bladders, windpipes and blood vessels have been successfully created and implanted into humans. (freerepublic.com)
  • I'll be telling you about an amazing discovery that allows humans to grow new parts for their body -- arms, legs, spinal nerves -- everything! (viewzone.com)
  • Understanding how to re-grow and rejuvenate cardiac muscle -- like the zebra fish does -- would prevent the number one cause of death for humans. (viewzone.com)
  • Can this remarkable ability be explained by genes shared by vertebrates, including humans, or by unique genes that the newt may have evolved? (eurekalert.org)
  • Humans are innately curious about how an animal cruising around one minute might lose an entire piece of its body and not only survive, but live to grow it back. (capeia.com)
  • Although it's not well-known, mice and even some humans can re-grow finger or toe tips that have been lost in accidents. (blogspot.com)
  • While lower vertebrates can regenerate an entire limb within a matter of weeks, mice and humans have maintained only a vestige of this ability," said Rinkevich. (blogspot.com)
  • spinal
  • Continued growth of the blastema is matched by the initiation of angiogenesis, followed by the re-development of peripheral axons and the ependymal tube of the spinal cord. (biomedcentral.com)
  • blood vessels
  • Most of the secretory molecules identified are known to be involved in the development and remodeling of blood vessels, events also involved in limb regeneration. (eurekalert.org)
  • Expression of TGFß1 and BMP2 in regenerating limbs shows that EryCs appear to release these factors into the regenerating blood vessels and capillaries as they enter the growing blastema. (phys.org)
  • researchers
  • In the study, the researchers constructed a database of all the protein-coding genes from the Japanese fire-bellied newt that had been reported in the Japan newt research community. (eurekalert.org)
  • To understand its function, the researchers investigated where and when the Newtic1 protein is expressed in the newt. (eurekalert.org)
  • fins
  • The zebra fish has been famous for growing lost fins, often the favorite "snack" for larger aquarium fish. (viewzone.com)