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  • levels
  • When an investigation was made to determine how and where this worker was being exposed to excessive radiation, investigators found that the air in the man's home contained extremely high levels of 'radon daughters,' the short-lived decay products of radon-222. (cdc.gov)
  • The family relocated until remedial actions to lower the indoor radon levels could be completed. (cdc.gov)
  • Approximately 40% of the homes had radon levels exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guideline for indoor radon of 0.02 'working levels. (cdc.gov)
  • About 7% of the homes tested had radon levels at or above the 0.1 working level. (cdc.gov)
  • however, EPA is now developing guidelines that will define action levels concerning houses with high concentrations of radon and is developing and evaluating mitigation strategies. (cdc.gov)
  • The risk rises in direct relationship with the length of exposure and with radon daughter levels. (cdc.gov)
  • Each year, approximately 5,000-30,000 deaths may be attributed to background levels of indoor radon. (cdc.gov)
  • The health threat from radon can be addressed by identifying geographic areas that could produce elevated levels of indoor radon, developing strategies to reduce exposure, conducting research on effective remedial measures to be taken in buildings, and providing educational programs for health officials and the public. (cdc.gov)
  • uranium
  • Changes in usage patterns of high-radon areas in a home, such as the basement, and the control of future construction in geographic areas high in uranium deposits can reduce exposure. (cdc.gov)