• Following the earthquake and tsunami that damaged the Fukushima plant last year, the Japanese government underestimated the amount of radiation released into the environment, including cessium-137 from the fuel pool at reactor 4. (infowars.com)
  • On top of that, it has been estimated that about 4000 people will die (or may already have died) from radiation-induced cancer, including workers exposed directly to radiation, and members of the public exposed to the huge release of radioactive material from the reactor. (newscientist.com)
  • Severe potential hazards did exist on the reactor sites because of high levels of radiation, but health controls were mainly effective. (newscientist.com)
  • Each atomic reactor produces the radioactive equivalent of hundreds of pounds of radium. (pitzer.edu)
  • About 5 percent of the reactor core actually went up into the air and was carried along the jet stream, allowing the radioactive material to spread across Europe. (popularmechanics.com)
  • In the first of these, the Boiling Accident,'' it is assumed that a fraction of the radioactive material in a reactor is released to the atmosphere at a steady rate over a period of hours. (unt.edu)
  • The news agency also reported Saturday that Japan's nuclear safety agency ordered the power company to open release valves in that plant, as well as the other Daiichi plant's 'No. 1' reactor. (cnn.com)
  • If that occurs it can melt the nuclear reactor core and the steel containment vessel and release radiation into the environment. (news.com.au)
  • TEPCO's new estimates suggest that its Fukushima reactor has released more than quadruple the amount of radioactive cesium-137 leaked during the Chernobyl disaster. (enenews.com)
  • It's possible that radioactive material in the reactor vessel could leak outside but the amount is expected to be small, and the wind blowing toward the sea will be considered," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano told a news conference. (reuters.com)
  • Equipment malfunctions, design problems and human error led to a partial meltdown of the reactor core at the Three Mile Island plant, but only minute amounts of dangerous radioactive gases were released. (reuters.com)
  • If the core of a nuclear reactor is not adequately cooled, it will become severely damaged, releasing large quantities of radioactive gases and vapours. (ccnr.org)
  • The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory (INL) today announced the public release of a joint INL/Nuclear Power Industry Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor (LWR) Research and Development. (typepad.com)
  • U.S. Rep. Paul Hodes, D-N.H., has announced a bill proposing that New Hampshire officials share in overseeing regulation at the Vermont Yankee atomic reactor , source of concentrated hazardous radioactive tritium leaks into groundwater that will eventually flow into the Connecticut River. (beyondnuclear.org)
  • Dr. Vassily Nesterenko, head of the Ukrainian Nuclear establishment at the time of the accident, flew over the burning reactor and took the only measurements of the radioactive plume. (ratical.org)
  • And plant officials confirmed earlier this week that sensors showed a tiny amount of radioactive gas may have leaked out of a building next to the Unit 3 reactor before it was shut down late Tuesday. (ocregister.com)
  • Dricks and Edison spokesman Gil Alexander, however, said that highly sensitive alarms were tripped in an building next to San Onofre's unit 3 reactor after the leak was detected about 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, indicating that at least some radioactive gas was present. (ocregister.com)
  • But a small leak in one of the tubes could have allowed radioactive water circulating from the reactor to mix with the water in the steam generator. (ocregister.com)
  • Initially, potential hydrogen explosions and reactor meltdown causing high radiation exposure of the workers were the most serious hazards. (bmj.com)
  • Ninety-two children 5 to 14 years of age living in areas exposed to the radioactive fallout from Chernobyl with recurrent respiratory infections (RRIs) were treated after randomization with either Viscum album praeparatum mali or pini (Iscador M or P). The dosage was two subcutaneous injections a week for 5 weeks with individual doses of 0.001 mg to 1.0 mg. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The term background is also sometimes used in this report to indicate radioactive elements present in the environment that are not a direct result of SRS activities (e.g. atmospheric weapons testing fallout, see definition for fallout ). (cdc.gov)
  • Jay Coghlan, executive director of Nuclear Watch New Mexico, cited a longhistory of denial about the claims of "down winders," the residents of Western states who were exposed to radioactive fallout fromatmospheric weapons testing. (latimes.com)
  • Fallout-radioactive particles that fall out of the atmosphere and settle onto plants, soil, and water-further adds to the burden when a person eats iodine-131 enriched fruits and vegetables or drinks water containing the isotope. (harvard.edu)
  • Potentially dangerous problems in cooling radioactive material appear to have cropped up there, as well as at another of the Tokyo Electric Power Co. nuclear plants, Ichiro Fujisaki, Japan's ambassador to the United States, confirmed to CNN. (cnn.com)
  • You cannot see or smell radon, but it can become a health hazard when it accumulates indoors. (water-research.net)
  • When radon decays and is inhaled into the lungs, it releases energy that can damage the DNA in sensitive lung tissue and cause cancer. (water-research.net)
  • Radon itself is radioactive because it also decays, losing an alpha particle and forming the element polonium. (water-research.net)
  • Polunium is also radioactive - it is this element, which is produced by radon in the air and in people's lungs, that can hurt lung tissue and cause lung cancer. (water-research.net)
  • The month of recognition is meant to spread information and awareness of potential radon threats and ways people can minimize exposure risks to this radioactive gas in their homes and other buildings," said Paul Cochrane, President of Cochrane and Associates and the IAQ Video Network. (environmental-expert.com)
  • This article explains the potential hazards of transite (cement asbestos) air ducts - asbestos fiber release, radon, and indoor air quality concerns, and duct collapse when transite air ducts are is found in buildings. (inspectapedia.com)
  • Fisheries minister Michihiko Kano said later in the day that the government intends to toughen inspections of marine products in Ibaraki and increase the number of inspections off Choshi, Chiba Prefecture, in light of the continuing leaks of radioactive materials into the Pacific Ocean from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. (blogspot.com)
  • Problems persist a decade after discovery of chronic radioactive leaks at Exelon plants. (uchicago.edu)
  • Radioactive waste continues to pour from Exelon's Illinois nuclear power plants more than a decade after discovery of chronic leaks led to national outrage, a $1.2 million government settlement and a company vow to guard against future accidents. (uchicago.edu)
  • Since 2007, there have been at least 35 reported leaks, spills or other accidental releases in Illinois of water contaminated with radioactive tritium, a byproduct of nuclear power production and a carcinogen at high levels, a Better Government Association review of federal and state records shows. (uchicago.edu)
  • Nuclear engineer Arnie Gundersen has called for Vermont Yankee to be shut down at least until the origin of its tritium leaks is found and fixed, in order to prevent any more tritium from being released into site groundwater and the Connecticut River. (beyondnuclear.org)
  • Brad Sylvester's article "Vermont Yankee's Radioactive Waste Likely Leaching into Connecticut River," posted at associatedcontent.com , provides a healthy dose of common sense skepticism to counteract the radiation doses flowing out of Entergy Nuclear, as well as the half-truths flowing from the lips its corporate officials as they try to undo the PR damage resulting from tritium leaks from underground pipes that supposedly didn't exist. (beyondnuclear.org)
  • ATSDR conducted the public health assessment to evaluate whether past, current and potential future releases of I-131 from the Oak Ridge Reservation could harm people living in communities near the reservation. (cdc.gov)
  • Recently discovered historical air monitoring data from the early and mid-1950s and deer thyroid data from 1979 to 1989 suggest that I-131 released into the air from RaLa processing did not extend beyond the X-10 site boundary at levels that would cause a public health hazard. (cdc.gov)
  • Data collected from this I-129 analysis can be used to address the uncertainties associated with the estimated thyroid doses in the 1999 Tennessee Department of Health report Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Task 1 Report ¯Iodine 131 Releases from the Radioactive Lanthanum Process at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) and to better define the off-site populations impacted by I-131 releases. (cdc.gov)
  • Thus, the disruption of the thyroid gland - such as occurs when the uptake of radioactive iodine triggers the development of thyroid cancer - threatens health and can even led to death. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Concern about granite building materials being health hazard arises due to these factors. (sbwire.com)
  • In addition, the Act requires the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to promulgate standards applicable to the GDPs, to protect the public health and safety from radiological hazards, and to provide for the common defense and security. (osha.gov)
  • Water containing radioactive material was released into the sea, but without an adverse effect on human health or the environment, it said. (reuters.com)
  • Release of bacterial aerosols during infectious waste compaction: an initial hazard evaluation for health care workers. (uth.edu)
  • But it would not obstruct serious health consequences from other radioactive elements. (taipeitimes.com)
  • The industrial hygiene community and Certified Industrial Hygienists in particular, are well versed in health risk analysis, hazard communication, community exposure, chemical hazards, engineering controls and ventilation, and air sampling and instrumentational analysis to identify, prevent and respond to many respirable pollutants that are known to cause lung cancer. (environmental-expert.com)
  • It's certainly okay to ignore minor issues with a property but the major health and safety hazards are really important to discover and address prior the closing on any home. (realtybiznews.com)
  • Here are 5 of the most common health and safety hazards we see on home inspections. (realtybiznews.com)
  • This was countered by William H. Taft IV, general counsel for the Department of Defense who wrote that Cranston's bill created "the unmistakable impression that exposure to low-level ionizing radiation is a significant health hazard" and would be "damaging to every aspect of the Department of Defense's nuclear weapons and nuclear propulsion programs. (ratical.org)
  • Large radioactive "hot spots" extending hundreds of miles away remainpublic health hazards today. (stopnewnuclear.org.uk)
  • The present invention generally relates to shielded containers for the handling of radioactive materials and, more particularly, to radiation dense shields allowing improved handling of radioactive iodine and the like used in the health care industry. (google.com)
  • In the health care industry, and more specificially, in the field of nuclear medicine, radioactive materials known as radiopharmaceuticals are used in various applications, including non-invasive imaging of patients for various diagnostic, as well as therapeutic, purposes. (google.com)
  • Because of the radioactive nature of radiopharmaceuticals, they should be handled carefully and various governmental agencies, including the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration, have promulgated regulations for safe handling of such materials. (google.com)
  • 3 To achieve these objectives, radiation levels at the site were monitored to avoid any additional release of radioactive materials, and clean-up of rubble was implemented while ensuring the safety and health of workers. (bmj.com)
  • We discuss how to identify cement asbestos transite air ducts, what the safety & health hazards are, how to seal or abandon the ductwork, & alternative approaches. (inspectapedia.com)
  • We are here to retrieve and evaluate documents relevant to off-site releases or health effects, bring about declassification of these documents as necessary for public release, enter the documents into a database, and take the first steps toward prioritization of releases. (cdc.gov)
  • This is the accessible text file for GAO report number GAO-06-164T entitled 'Securing U.S. Nuclear Materials: Poor Planning Has Complicated DOE's Plutonium Consolidation Efforts' which was released on October 7, 2005. (gao.gov)
  • Without a monitoring capability, DOE faces increased risks of an accidental plutonium release that could harm workers, the public, and the environment. (gao.gov)
  • Scientific evidence has shown that tiny plutonium particles can be brought to the surface and released into the air, where they can be readily inhaled by anyone nearby. (change.org)
  • Tom Carpenter, executive director of another watchdog group, the Hanford Challenge in central Washington state, said that the Energy Department as recently as last year released an unknown quantity of radioactive particles during demolition of a shuttered weapons factory, the Plutonium Finishing Plant. (latimes.com)
  • Still, the plant -- along with its spent nuclear fuel, extracted plutonium and nuclear reprocessing waste -- poses significant radiological hazards that a military strike could disperse into the environment. (taipeitimes.com)
  • Several of the underground storage tanks currently used to store waste at Hanford have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. (unt.edu)
  • Research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has sought to quantify the release of flammable gases during salt well pumping operations. (unt.edu)
  • The container includes one or more activated charcoal filters to absorb any gases given off by the radioactive iodine when sealed in the cavity. (google.com)
  • Another drawback is that radioactive iodine can release gases which can accumulate in the enclosed radiopharmaceutical pigs and pose a hazard to personnel when the radiopharmaceutical pigs are opened for removal of the radioactive iodine. (google.com)
  • A stream of particles or electromagnetic waves emitted by the atoms and molecules of a radioactive substance as a result of nuclear decay. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • As the nucleus of a radioactive element decays, it releases alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The approach typically involves (1) ultra sensitive chemical or radiometric analyses of particles separated on the basis of size, density, mineral or magnetic properties, (2) analysis of chemical extracts that selectively attack certain components of coal or fly ash, (3) direct observation and microbeam analysis of very small areas or grains, and (4) radiographic techniques that identify the location and abundance of radioactive elements. (usgs.gov)
  • Radioactive decay is a natural, spontaneous process in which an atom of one element decays or breaks down to form another element by losing atomic particles (protons, neutrons, or electrons). (water-research.net)
  • Eleven operating nuclear power plants shut down automatically however three of them suffered what's known as an INES 7 accident (the highest disaster level for nuclear plants) causing a loss of power, leading to loss of cooling protocols and subsequent radioactive releases. (news.com.au)
  • Faculty and staff members who are engaged as Principal Investigators and/or have significant responsibility for administrative, medical, academic or experimental functions involving radioactive materials/radiation, and who can fulfill the requirements in section 2.2.4 of this Radiation Safety Manual, may apply for a RUA. (unr.edu)
  • To an ardent greenie, nuclear free means a prohibition of anything involving radioactive materials, even banning the transport of radiopharmaceuticals for use in medical treatment. (scribd.com)
  • The Authorized User is responsible for the safe use of the radiation source(s), and STRICT compliance with the contents of this manual, the provisions and requirements of NAC 459, and the university radioactive materials license. (unr.edu)
  • Location: building name, room number, department in which radioactive materials will be used. (unr.edu)
  • Written department chair approval to apply for the use of radioactive materials. (unr.edu)
  • However, in order to keep an accurate radioisotope inventory (as required by regulations) and to review any proposed uses of ionizing radiation at UNR, it is required that an RUA be approved prior to any purchases of "Exempt" quantity of radioactive materials (i.e., check sources, etc. (unr.edu)
  • Identify sources and types of hazardous materials and estimate the quantities released. (cdc.gov)
  • It can also be released from building materials which may be used for the house. (realtybiznews.com)
  • When older homes catch fire and collapse, asbestos fibers from the construction materials can be released into the air. (martindale.com)
  • Proposals involving human subjects, vertebrate animals, radioactive materials, or biohazards require special approval before they can be submitted. (bowdoin.edu)
  • Radioactive Materials. (bowdoin.edu)
  • Efforts were made to achieve stable cooling of the nuclear reactors, and the release of radioactive materials was brought under control. (bmj.com)
  • The tasks of disaster response technical workers in Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP after the tsunami were to restore the cooling of reactors and the fuel pools, containment and treatment of water contaminated by radioactive materials, and mitigation of radioactive materials emission in the environment eventually achieving the cold shutdown of the NPP. (bmj.com)
  • Working conditions at the GDPs involve both radiological and non-radiological occupational hazards. (osha.gov)
  • In general, NRC will apply its standards to working conditions involving radiological hazards, OSHA will apply its standards to working conditions involving non-radiological hazards, and both agencies will apply their standards to conditions involving a combination of hazards. (osha.gov)
  • This will include regulation of radiological hazards and any other hazards that may affect radiological safety of the facilities. (osha.gov)
  • Hobbs, who doesn't own a cat, is one of the researchers who studied the nuclear waste mixture that in 2014 led to a drum failure and radiological release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M. The accident shut down the facility for three years. (acs.org)
  • When Hobbs heard about the Feb. 14, 2014, radiological release at WIPP, two things sprang to mind. (acs.org)
  • It says the radiological release likely stemmed from a single breached drum. (acs.org)
  • Anisokinetic sampling - a sampling condition that involves a mismatch between the air or \fluid velocity in the sampling probe and that in the stack releasing airborne effluents. (cdc.gov)
  • Activity - the mean number of decays per unit time of a radioactive nuclide expressed as disintegrations per second. (cdc.gov)
  • All of the other radioactive elements have been removed from the water by chemical treatment down to low levels and the amount of other elements in the water is relatively small and wouldn't pose a hazard diluted to this degree. (forbes.com)
  • And that's because it's contaminated mainly with tritium, the least radioactive, and least harmful, of all radioactive elements. (forbes.com)
  • Those of us who do understand have suggested slowly releasing the tritium-contaminated water into the Pacific Ocean over about a ten-year period. (forbes.com)
  • Other releases of tritium, however, can be illegal and subject to fines and government lawsuits - though no accidents from the past decade resulted in either. (uchicago.edu)
  • Entergy Nuclear, which does not own the aquifer beneath its nuclear power plant, is leaking large amounts of hazardous radioactive tritium into the groundwater, which is very likely flowing into the Connecticut River. (beyondnuclear.org)
  • A trade ministry official said that TEPCO was also considering releasing pressure at its other plant, the Daini plant. (reuters.com)
  • He/she must insure that all persons working under his/her supervision have received proper training and are aware of the radiation hazards associated with their activities. (unr.edu)
  • There was a serious deficit in knowledge and awareness of radiation hazards among Palestinian radio technologists, which may expose patients to unnecessary doses of ionizing radiation. (who.int)
  • One type of natural transmutation observable in the present occurs when certain radioactive elements present in nature spontaneously decay by a process that causes transmutation, such as alpha or beta decay. (wikipedia.org)
  • Three of the Daiichi reactor's six units shut down because of the earthquake, while operations at the other three were out due to 'regular inspection,' the Tokyo Electric Power Co. said in a news release Saturday. (cnn.com)
  • It said the sector began putting more emphasis on external hazards after an earthquake hit TEPCO's Kashiwazaki-Kariwa plant in July 2007, until then the largest to ever affect a nuclear facility. (reuters.com)
  • However, because sufficient information was not available about the actual areas impacted by RaLa releases, ATSDR cannot identify which communities surrounding the X-10 site may have been impacted in the past by thyroid doses in excess of 10 rads. (cdc.gov)
  • About 4000 cases of thyroid cancer, which typically kills about 5 per cent of people who get it, have been attributed to inhalation and ingestion of radioactive iodine by children. (newscientist.com)
  • The thyroid stores it as readily as natural, non-radioactive iodine. (harvard.edu)
  • A transmutation can be achieved either by nuclear reactions (in which an outside particle reacts with a nucleus) or by radioactive decay, where no outside cause is needed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) using deep boreholes in geological formations (salt rock) had been previously considered in Germany a long time ago [ 1 ] but was not pursued then. (mdpi.com)
  • Thompson makes clear that a partial drain down of a high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) storage pool is an even worse-case scenario than a complete drain down, for air cooling provided by convection currents -- which might otherwise prevent ignition of the irradiated nuclear fuel's combustible zirconium cladding -- is blocked by the layer of water in the bottom of the pool. (beyondnuclear.org)
  • The findings provide troubling new evidence that the federal government is losing control of at least some of the radioactive byproducts of the country's weapons program. (latimes.com)
  • Source term information may be entered as radionuclide release quantities for transport scenarios or as basic radionuclide concentrations in environmental media (air, water, soil). (oecd-nea.org)
  • After a series of three releases during 2017, the Energy Department shut down the demolition and has yet to resume it. (latimes.com)
  • Actinides - radioactive elements with atomic numbers equal to or greater than that of actinium (i.e., 88). (cdc.gov)
  • Actinide elements are all radioactive. (cdc.gov)
  • Radioactive elements are among the most lethal toxicants in man's environment. (pitzer.edu)
  • In order to accurately address these questions and to predict the mobility of radioactive elements during the coal fuel-cycle, it is important to determine the concentration, distribution, and form of radioactive elements in coal and fly ash. (usgs.gov)
  • Assessment of the radiation exposure from coal burning is critically dependent on the concentration of radioactive elements in coal and in the fly ash that remains after combustion. (usgs.gov)
  • Elements heavier than iron, such as gold and lead, are created through elemental transmutations that can only take place in supernovae - as stars begin to fuse heavier elements, substantially less energy is released from each fusion reaction, and each fusion reaction that produces elements heavier than iron is endothermic in nature, and stars are incapable of carrying this out. (wikipedia.org)
  • The elements that produce radiation are called radioactive. (water-research.net)
  • This unit of measure is named for the French physicist Marie Curie, who was a pioneer in the research on radioactive elements and their decay. (water-research.net)
  • Despite their name, rare-earth elements are - with the exception of the radioactive promethium - relatively plentiful in Earth's crust , with cerium being the 25th most abundant element at 68 parts per million, more abundant than copper . (wikipedia.org)
  • Kaltofen, who also is the principal investigator at the nuclear and chemical forensics consulting firm Boston Chemical Data Corp., released a second study in recent weeks. (latimes.com)
  • Many factors can influence the impact of a CBR agent release, including the agent's physical and chemical properties, toxicity, concentration, mode of transmission, and location of release. (esmagazine.com)