Loading...
  • therapeutic
  • Assessment of therapeutic interventions for HS in humans exposed to nontherapeutic radiation is difficult because of the limits of the evidence. (nih.gov)
  • individuals exposed
  • The World Health Organization convened a panel of experts to evaluate the evidence and develop recommendations for medical countermeasures for the management of HS in a hypothetical scenario involving the hospitalization of 100 to 200 individuals exposed to radiation. (nih.gov)
  • type of radiation
  • This type of radiation is emitted by devices used in wireless telecommunication, including mobile phones, and by many other sources in occupational and general environmental settings. (who.int)
  • published in 2010), it should be emphasized that the evaluations in this volume address the general question of whether RF radiation causes cancer in humans or in experimental animals: it does not specifically or exclusively consider mobile phones, but rather the type of radiation emitted by mobile phones and various other sources. (who.int)
  • Energies
  • The table below contains estimates of the energies of various kinds of radiation. (purdue.edu)
  • Silicon carbide (SiC) provides an alternate solution as a radiation hard material, because of its wide bandgap and higher atomic displacement energies, for devices intended for radiation environment applications. (diva-portal.org)
  • atom
  • Because of this, the atom will in total have a positive charge instead of a neutral charge, the atom will be ionized, and becomes an ion. (utwente.nl)
  • produces
  • Radiation-induced oxidation of guanine bases produces 8-oxo-7-hydro-guanine ( GO ). (mun.ca)
  • It produces intense ionizing radiation in that it can kill animal lifeform within hours and ionize ordinary drinking water in a bottle. (abovetopsecret.com)
  • The body protects itself against free radicals using antioxidants, but if the level of antioxidants is too low, radiation produces oxidative stress and genetic damage, which leads to ageing and death. (phys.org)
  • background radiation
  • We found the opposite - that antioxidant levels increased and oxidative stress decreased with increasing background radiation. (phys.org)
  • They measured background radiation levels at each site, and took feather and blood samples before releasing the birds. (phys.org)
  • The results revealed that with increasing background radiation , the birds' body condition and glutathione levels increased and oxidative stress and DNA damage decreased. (phys.org)
  • spontaneously
  • Visible light is so ubiquitous that molecules that are ionized by it will often react nearly spontaneously unless protected by materials that block the visible spectrum. (statemaster.com)
  • Dosimetry
  • As part of the NIST on a Chip program, the Photonic Dosimetry project is set to develop in-situ sub-micrometer ionizing-radiation dosimetry and calorimetry. (nist.gov)
  • The four authors continuing the pioneering work of Frank Attix, Prof Pedro Andreo (Karolinska, Stockholm), Dr David T. Burns (BIPM, Paris), Prof Alan E. Nahum (University of Liverpool) and Prof Jan Seuntjens (McGill University, Montreal), are leading scientists in radiation dosimetry, having published between them more than 600 papers in the field. (wiley.com)
  • interaction
  • The students are able to apply the basic knowledge of the interaction of radiation with matter in practical situations. (rug.nl)
  • Begg AC (1990) Cisplatin and radiation: Interaction probabilities and therapeutic possibilities. (springer.com)
  • topics
  • Among others, the German Bundestag dealt with topics affecting the tasks of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection ( BfS ). (bfs.de)
  • The compilation includes answers to parliamentary inquiries on the topic of ionising radiation which have been answered by the federal government on the basis of contributions made by the BfS or, respectively, whose topics are among the tasks of the BfS . (bfs.de)
  • source
  • Perhaps the most important source of fear is the fact that radiation can't be detected by the average person. (purdue.edu)
  • biochemical
  • The method focuses the analysis on individual birds instead of species averages, making it a much more sensitive way to analyse biochemical responses to radiation. (phys.org)
  • clinical
  • Overall, MRE was a useful tool in this clinical setting, leading the management change in 86 percent of patients with Crohn's without the use of ionizing radiation," concluded the investigators. (eurekalert.org)
  • Uses of such a high-throughput blood based test include: clinical response to radiation therapy for cancer treatments, radiation accident victims, and homeland security applications. (aacrjournals.org)