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  • Nuclear
  • This seemingly authoritative declaration that the Philippines is 'safe' from radiation should not be allowed to blind the public to the real dangers brought about by the Japan Nuclear Reactor Disaster which has already surpassed the Three Mile Island incident and is alarmingly approaching the scale of the Chernobyl catastrophe. (abs-cbn.com)
  • The authorities apparently refer to the so-called standards of permissible or acceptable limits set by the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission as basis for declaring that exposure levels of the public are 'small' and within 'safety' limits and that significant risk of harm is limited to the immediate vicinity of the power plants. (abs-cbn.com)
  • The characteristic blue glow of an underwater nuclear reactor is due to Cherenkov radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Devices intended for high radiation environments such as the nuclear industry and extra atmospheric (space) applications may be made radiation hard to resist such effects through design, material selection, and fabrication methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is of special concern as it can greatly affect their ability to perform in nuclear reactors and is the emphasis of radiation material science, which seeks to mitigate this danger. (wikipedia.org)
  • As concrete is used extensively in the construction of nuclear power plants, where it provides structure as well as containing radiation, the effect of radiation on it is also of major interest. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nuclear weapons have vastly widened the scope of attention, and the layman has long recognized that he lives in an age when radiation is a highly publicized fact of life. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Like all procedures that involve a radioactive substance, nuclear medicine techniques that use radiopharmaceuticals generate radiation that could potentially have adverse effects on a patient. (news-medical.net)
  • tumour
  • During external beam radiation therapy, a machine directs radiation through the skin to the tumour and some of the tissue around it. (cancer.ca)
  • Besides the tumour itself, the radiation fields may also include the draining lymph nodes if they are clinically or radiologically involved with tumor, or if there is thought to be a risk of subclinical malignant spread. (wikipedia.org)
  • hazards
  • Perhaps the most recent application of this field to applied sciences has taken place since the advent of the space age, when those concerned with the effects of unusual environmental conditions upon man have focused attention on the radiation hazards in space (Hanrahan & Bushnell 1960, pp. 155-188). (encyclopedia.com)
  • tumor
  • Radiation therapy is commonly applied to the cancerous tumor because of its ability to control cell growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is important to distinguish the radiosensitivity of a particular tumor, which to some extent is a laboratory measure, from the radiation "curability" of a cancer in actual clinical practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though this type of radiation does travel throughout the body, the radioactive substance mostly collects in the area of the tumor, so there's little effect on the rest of the body. (cancer.org)
  • Sometimes, radiation to prevent future cancer can be given at the same time radiation is given to treat existing cancer, especially if the area the cancer might spread is close to the tumor itself. (cancer.org)
  • treatments
  • But parents whose kids need radiation therapy - one of the most common treatments for childhood cancer - often have many questions and concerns about it. (kidshealth.org)
  • Radiation is one of the most common treatments for cancer. (cancer.org)
  • Some radiation treatments (systemic radiation therapy) use radioactive substances that are given in a vein or by mouth. (cancer.org)
  • Still, radiation therapy can be used to treat many types of cancer either alone or in combination with other treatments. (cancer.org)
  • physics
  • If each Fourier mode of the equilibrium radiation in an otherwise empty cavity with perfectly reflective walls is considered as a degree of freedom capable of exchanging energy, then, according to the equipartition theorem of classical physics, there would be an equal amount of energy in each mode. (wikipedia.org)
  • gamma
  • Radiation may affect materials and devices in deleterious ways: By causing the materials to become radioactive (mainly by neutron activation, or in presence of high-energy gamma radiation by photodisintegration). (wikipedia.org)
  • recover
  • Nearby normal cells can also be affected by radiation, but most recover and go back to working the way they should. (cancer.org)
  • affects
  • Answers common questions, such as what radiation therapy is and how it affects cancer cells. (cancer.gov)
  • Since radiation therapy affects people in different ways, they may also tell you that some of the information in this booklet does not apply to you. (cancer.gov)
  • common
  • In their original work on the theoretical foundations of Cherenkov radiation, Tamm and Frank wrote,"This peculiar radiation can evidently not be explained by any common mechanism such as the interaction of the fast electron with individual atom or as radiative scattering of electrons on atomic nuclei. (wikipedia.org)
  • results
  • The results of the testing of radiation detection instruments with radionuclide identification capabilities will depended on the sources used for the tests. (nist.gov)
  • given
  • Radiation therapy is given for different reasons. (cancer.ca)
  • Since you are taking the Lorentz reciprocity theorem as a given, I don't understand why the proof that an antenna works equally well as a transmitter and receiver, for the same radiation pattern, needs to be so long. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • In some cases, the area where the cancer most often spreads to may be treated with radiation to kill any cancer cells before they grow into tumors. (cancer.org)
  • For instance, people with certain kinds of lung cancer may get preventive (prophylactic) radiation to the head because their type of lung cancer often spreads to the brain. (cancer.org)
  • healthy
  • During radiation therapy, the healthcare team protects healthy cells in the treatment area as much as possible. (cancer.ca)
  • Radiation treatment is planned to damage cancer cells, with as little harm as possible to nearby healthy cells. (cancer.org)
  • uses
  • The child will lie on an X-ray table while a radiation therapist uses an X-ray machine (called a simulator) to define the treatment area. (kidshealth.org)
  • treatment
  • Radiation therapy has several applications in non-malignant conditions, such as the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia , acoustic neuromas , severe thyroid eye disease , pterygium , pigmented villonodular synovitis , and prevention of keloid scar growth, vascular restenosis , and heterotopic ossification . (wikipedia.org)
  • Before the first radiation treatment, a planning session called simulation will help a family prepare. (kidshealth.org)
  • This "tattoo" should not be wiped off because it helps to position the radiation for each treatment. (kidshealth.org)
  • At each external radiation appointment, the child will wear a hospital gown or robe and enter the radiation treatment room, where the radiation therapist will settle the child into position. (kidshealth.org)
  • Most of the time that a child spends on the radiation treatment table involves proper positioning - the treatment itself takes only minutes. (kidshealth.org)
  • This is because radiation can cause less damage and the organ may be more likely to work the way it should after treatment. (cancer.org)