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  • Freud's
  • Feeding as an infant if one of the primary rituals that occurs for the first many months of a baby's life, where Freud's theory would explain the wants and needs of a smoker that is still unconsciously stuck in the oral stage of life. (spotbit.com)
  • The next stage of Freud's theory is the anal stage that occurs from one to three years of age, where the toddler pleasures from retaining and eliminating feces. (spotbit.com)
  • The subsequent stage from Freud's theory is the latency stage, in which this is not a stage rather a pause of sexual desires where the energy is placed in other activities such as schoolwork and sports (Stassen). (spotbit.com)
  • In both theories of the adolescence stages a somewhat completion of both sexual desires and pleasures originates, but Erickson describes a role confusion, where the adolescence needs to find and answer of the question "Who am I", unlike Freud's stage of sexual satisfaction and stimulation in a heterosexual relationships (Stassen). (spotbit.com)
  • Both Freud's and Erickson's development stages have many similar attributes because Erickson believed in Freud's theories but expanded on them further and included family and culture. (spotbit.com)
  • In addition to that of a person will have to be successful at each stage or a problem will exist in the person's future, although Freud's theories must be accomplish in the same way or fear of struggles from the unconsciousness will emerge in adulthood. (spotbit.com)
  • scientific
  • This book reported a program of research that began with the aim of explaining anti-Semitism, but culminated in a far more ambitious theory, which for a time dominated social scientific inquiry into the psychological bases of prejudice and ethnocentrism. (encyclopedia.com)
  • It also held that "teaching a variety of scientific theories about the origins of humankind to school children might be validly done with the clear secular intent of enhancing the effectiveness of science instruction. (princeton.edu)
  • An aspect of scientific methodology that bolsters and complements theories. (studystack.com)
  • psychoanalysis
  • The term relational psychoanalysis was first used by Greenberg and Mitchell (1983) to bridge the traditions of interpersonal relations, as developed within interpersonal psychoanalysis and object relations, as developed within contemporary British theory. (routledge.com)
  • Developmental Perspectives in Child Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy incorporates recent innovations in developmental theory and research into our understanding of the nature of change in child psychotherapy. (routledge.com)
  • differently
  • With this essay, she presents a major new theory of "evocative objects": Wearable computers, PDAs, online multiple identities, "companion species" (such as quasi-alive virtual pets, digital dolls, and robot nurses for the elderly), "affective computing" devices (such as the human-like Kismet robot), and the imminent age of machines designed as relational artifacts are causing us to see ourselves and our world differently. (kurzweilai.net)
  • object-relati
  • Connectionist descriptions of how mind was 'emergent' from the interactions of agents had significant resonance with the way psychoanalytic object-relations theory talked about objects in a dynamic inner landscape. (kurzweilai.net)
  • view
  • It is only a small step from the psychoanalytic view of hysteria, which regards it as a form of illness, albeit without physical causation, to the communicational view of hysteria, which regards it as a form of communication-specifically, as the language of illness. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Over the years, sensitive, well- trained psychoanalytic investigators have formulated concepts con- cerning mental functioning from disparate and often opposing points of view. (nii.ac.jp)
  • world
  • Pitlochry, a small Scottish town, is known in the psychoanalytic world as the home of Klein's analysis of ten-year-old Richard, carried out in the middle of the Second World War, all 93 sessions written up in detail and published in Narrative of a Child Analysis (Hogarth Press,1961). (melanie-klein-trust.org.uk)
  • research
  • Critics, however, noted methodological flaws in the research, and pointed out that the theory ignored authoritarianism of the Left. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Critique
  • Self-examination and self-critique: for psychoanalytic patients, this is the conduit to growth. (routledge.com)
  • Decentering Relational Theory: A Comparative Critique invites relational theorists to contemplate the influence, overlaps, and relationship between relational theory and other perspectives. (routledge.com)
  • Ambiguity for individuation: A critique and reformulation of double-bind theory. (springer.com)
  • patients
  • Such patients are challenging for a psychoanalytic approach that assumes that the patient relates in the verbal realm and is capable of reflective function. (routledge.com)