Loading...
  • Putative
  • Putative bifunctional protein of 748 aas and 12 TMSs with an N-terminal sodium:alanine symporter domain and a C-terminal phosphatidylserine decarboxylase proenzyme domain. (tcdb.org)
  • The most recent families added include the PAAP (Putative Amino Acid Permease), LIVCS (Branched Chain Amino Acid:Cation Symporter), NRAMP (Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein), CstA (Carbon starvation A protein), KUP (K⁺ Uptake Permease), BenE (Benzoate:H⁺ Virginia Symporter), and AE (Anion Exchanger). (wikipedia.org)
  • serine
  • The protein is expressed in the inactive apo form and the 4'-phosphopantetheine moiety must be post-translationally attached to a conserved serine residue on the ACP by the action of holo-acyl carrier protein synthase (ACPS), a 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase. (wikipedia.org)
  • glutamate
  • Once ammonium has entered the cell via diffusion across the cytoplasmic membrane or by protein-dependent transport, it is assimilated into the major biosynthetic nitrogen donors L-glutamate and L-glutamine through one of two pathways, depending on nitrogen availability. (biomedcentral.com)
  • eukaryotic
  • Although first discovered within the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, nucleic acids are now known to be found in all life forms including within bacteria, archaea, mitochondria, chloroplasts, viruses, and viroids. (wikipedia.org)
  • N-linked glycosylation in eukaryotic cells follows a conserved pathway in which a tetradecasaccharide substrate (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) is initially assembled in the ER membrane as a dolichylpyrophosphate (Dol-PP)-linked intermediate before being transferred to an asparaginyl residue in a lumenal protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • nucleotides
  • The encoded information is contained and conveyed via the nucleic acid sequence, which provides the 'ladder-step' ordering of nucleotides within the molecules of RNA and DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Well-studied biological nucleic acid molecules range in size from 21 nucleotides (small interfering RNA) to large chromosomes (human chromosome 1 is a single molecule that contains 247 million base pairs). (wikipedia.org)
  • Nucleic acids are linear polymers (chains) of nucleotides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nucleic acid types differ in the structure of the sugar in their nucleotides-DNA contains 2'-deoxyribose while RNA contains ribose (where the only difference is the presence of a hydroxyl group). (wikipedia.org)
  • glycine
  • Iminoglycinuria, sometimes called familial iminoglycinuria, is an autosomal recessive disorder of renal tubular transport affecting reabsorption of the amino acid glycine, and the imino acids proline and hydroxyproline. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iminoglycinuria is a rare and complex disorder, associated with a number of genetic mutations that cause defects in both renal and intestinal transport systems of glycine and imino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary characteristic of iminoglycinuria is the presence of glycine and imino acids in the urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hyperglycinuria is another disorder affecting reabsorption of glycine and imino acids, similar to iminoglycinuria and considered to be a heterozygous form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both reabsorption or absorption of glycine and imino acids takes place respectively at the proximal tubule or intestinal brush border epithelium. (wikipedia.org)
  • several mutations, affecting transport mechanisms shared by glycine, proline and hydroxyproline, as well as those that selectively transport either glycine or imino acids, including the IMINO system, are known to be associated with the disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, despite the role that intestinal malabsorption of glycine and imino acids can play in iminoglycinuria, the primary defect disrupts their renal transport and reabsorption. (wikipedia.org)
  • The protein encoded by this gene is an integral membrane protein involved in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine uptake into synaptic vesicles. (wikipedia.org)
  • absorption
  • Absorption refers to the overall process happening in the intestine in lieu of normal digestive breakdown of proteins, while reabsorption refers to the process occurring in the renal proximal tubule to reclaim amino and imino acids that have been filtered out of the blood via the glomerulus. (wikipedia.org)
  • secondary
  • The mechanism of energy coupling is not established, but homology with the MATE family suggests that they are secondary carriers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proline is considered and usually referred to as an amino acid, but unlike others, it has a secondary amine. (wikipedia.org)
  • tryptophan
  • We report here an expansion of these efforts by incorporation of an amino substituted variant of tryptophan into the "cyan" GFP mutant, which turned it into a "gold" variant. (deepdyve.com)
  • molecular
  • ab45376 detects a 95kDa protein corresponding to the apparent molecular mass of Semaphorin 3A on SDS-PAGE immunoblots of human recombinant Sema3A/Fc chimera. (abcam.com)
  • The more selective transport of proline and other imino acids is driven at the molecular level by a mammalian cellular transport mechanism aptly known as system IMINO. (wikipedia.org)
  • acidic
  • In 1889 Richard Altmann discovered that nuclein has acidic properties, and it became called nucleic acid In 1938 Astbury and Bell published the first X-ray diffraction pattern of DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Humans
  • Y+L amino acid transporter 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SLC7A7 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • In mammals, including humans, the transport of amino and imino acids from the lumen (interior) of the intestine or the renal proximal tubule into the cells occurs at the brush border membrane of the epithelium (moist, tightly packed cellular lining of many tissues and organs of the body). (wikipedia.org)
  • mainly
  • As an early alteration, perinuclear deposits of EAAC1 protein were found mainly in the large pyramidal neurons at the hippocampus, neocortex, piriform cortex, and amygdala with the reduction of neuropil staining 6 hours after KA injection. (biomedsearch.com)
  • methionine
  • Ned Budisa made seminal contributions to our understanding of the role of methionine oxidation in prion protein aggregation and has discovered the roles of proline side chain conformations (endo-exo isomerism) in translation, folding and stability of proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • novel
  • An increasing number of non-natural amino acids are available for chromophore redesign (by engineering of the genetic code) and enable new general strategies to generate novel classes of tailor-made GFP proteins. (deepdyve.com)
  • bacteria
  • The genetic code (the "translation table" according to which DNA information is translated into amino acids, and hence proteins) is nearly identical for all known lifeforms, from bacteria and archaea to animals and plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each Gram-positive bacterial PST system functions in conjunction with a homologous MPA1 + C pair of proteins equivalent to an MPA1-C proteins of Gram-negative bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • family
  • The term nucleic acid is the overall name for DNA and RNA, members of a family of biopolymers, and is synonymous with polynucleotide. (wikipedia.org)
  • A representative list of proteins belonging to the MATE family can be found in the Transporter Classification Database. (wikipedia.org)
  • The probable transport reaction catalyzed by NorM, and possibly by other proteins of the MATE family is: Antimicrobial (in) + nNa+ (out) → Antimicrobial (out) + nNa+ (in). (wikipedia.org)
  • The generalized transport reaction catalyzed by PST family proteins is: Lipid-linked polysaccharide precursor (in) + energy → Lipid-linked polysaccharide precursor (out). (wikipedia.org)
  • SpoT belongs to the RSH protein family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Structures
  • There are numerous exceptions, however-some viruses have genomes made of double-stranded RNA and other viruses have single-stranded DNA genomes, and, in some circumstances, nucleic acid structures with three or four strands can form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chemical
  • In RNA, base-pair sequencing provides for manufacturing new proteins that determine the frames and parts and most chemical processes of all life forms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nucleic acids are also generated within the laboratory, through the use of enzymes (DNA and RNA polymerases) and by solid-phase chemical synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • All known forms of life are based on the same fundamental biochemical organization: genetic information encoded in DNA, transcribed into RNA, through the effect of protein- and RNA-enzymes, then translated into proteins by (highly similar) ribosomes, with ATP, NADPH and others as energy sources. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecules
  • It was shown that the adsorption of larger molecules such as tannic acid (MW, 1700 g mol(-1)), humic acid, and RR222 from water onto composite beads was better described by the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Protein is essential for your health as it's a structural component of enzymes, cellular receptors, signaling molecules, and a main building block for your muscles and bones. (mercola.com)
  • Nucleic acids are generally very large molecules. (wikipedia.org)