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  • sequence
  • These algorithms usually perform better than enhancer-finding algorithms built only on the occurrence profiles of known TF motifs, suggesting that the algorithms detect previously unidentified functional sequence characteristics that, if interpreted, could fill gaps in current knowledge about TF binding specificities and other enhancer sequence properties. (biomedcentral.com)
  • anticoagulant
  • The main form of C4BP in human blood is composed of 7 identical alpha-chains and one unique beta-chain, which in turn binds anticoagulant, vitamin K-dependent protein S. C4BP is a large glycoprotein (500 kDa) with an estimated plasma concentration of 200 micrograms/mL synthesized mainly in the liver. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sterol
  • Concretely, they constitute a family of sterol and phosphoinositide binding and transfer proteins in eukaryotes that are conserved from yeast to humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • In mammalian cells, some ORPs function as sterol sensors that regulate the assembly of protein complexes in response to changes in cholesterol levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • In mammalian, ORPs participate as sterol sensors.This sensors regulate the assembly of protein complexes when cholesterol levels fluctuate. (wikipedia.org)
  • concentrations
  • Higher drug concentrations would lead to a higher fraction unbound, because the plasma protein would be saturated with drug and any excess drug would be unbound. (wikipedia.org)
  • residues
  • The mature protein comprises around 165 residues, and contains a number of potential N-glycosylation sites. (wikipedia.org)
  • TBP binds with the negatively charged phosphates in the DNA backbone through positively charged lysine and arginine amino acid residues. (wikipedia.org)
  • unbound
  • The bound drug is kept in the blood stream while the unbound component may be metabolized or excreted, making it the active part. (wisegeek.com)
  • A drug in blood exists in two forms: bound and unbound. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the protein binding is reversible, then a chemical equilibrium will exist between the bound and unbound states, such that: Protein + drug ⇌ Protein-drug complex Notably, it is the unbound fraction which exhibits pharmacologic effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bound portion may act as a reservoir or depot from which the drug is slowly released as the unbound form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the unbound form is being metabolized and/or excreted from the body, the bound fraction will be released in order to maintain equilibrium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Note: The most commonly used methods for measuring drug concentration levels in the plasma measure bound as well as unbound fractions of the drug. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the amount of plasma protein is decreased (such as in catabolism, malnutrition, liver disease, renal disease), there would also be a higher fraction unbound. (wikipedia.org)
  • If Drug B is also given, it can displace Drug A from the protein, thereby increasing Drug A's fraction unbound. (wikipedia.org)
  • reversible
  • Binding is often reversible and in these cases can create a chemical equilibrium, in which the chemical reaction can go backward and forward with no net change in reactants and products. (wisegeek.com)
  • known
  • The identity of the proteins involved and the localisation mechanism are not known. (wikipedia.org)
  • TRFs are double-stranded proteins which are known to induce bending, looping, and pairing of DNA which aids in the formation of T-loops. (wikipedia.org)
  • complex
  • Metal-protein complex-mediated transport and delivery of Ni2+ to TCR/MHC contact sites in nickel-specific human T cell activation," Journal of Immunology , vol. 172, no. 3, pp. 1926-1934, 2004. (hindawi.com)
  • This region modulates the DNA binding activity of the C-terminus, and modulation of DNA-binding affects the rate of transcription complex formation and initiation of transcription. (wikipedia.org)
  • TFIID is the first protein to bind to DNA during the formation of the pre-initiation transcription complex of RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II). (wikipedia.org)
  • Nuclear
  • The CREB protein carries out its function by activating transcription, where interaction with transcription factors is managed by one or more CREB domains: the nuclear receptor interaction domain (RID), the KIX domain (CREB and MYB interaction domain), the cysteine/histidine regions (TAZ1/CH1 and TAZ2/CH3) and the interferon response binding domain (IBiD). (wikipedia.org)
  • interaction
  • The interaction with apoptotic and necrotic cells is mediated by the Gla domain of protein S and does not affect the ability of C4BP to inhibit complement. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the DNA bends, its contact with TBP increases, thus enhancing the DNA-protein interaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • sites
  • It has four sites that can bind to an oxygen molecule. (wisegeek.com)
  • Identification of binding sites is a functional issue especially in structure-based drug design. (springer.com)
  • Huang, B., Schroeder, M.: LIGSITEcsc: predicting ligand binding sites using the Connolly surface and degree of conservation. (springer.com)
  • entropy
  • Their work, entitled "Influence of temperature and diffusive entropy on the capture radius of fly-casting binding", was published in SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy, 2011, 54(12). (redorbit.com)
  • The results demonstrate that candidate binding pockets obtain less relative Von Neumann entropy which means more random scattering of voids inside them. (springer.com)