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  • Sensory
  • Because proprioception requires instant and coordinated communication between these systems, MS can leave us a little less 'in touch' with our sensory responses. (verywell.com)
  • For example, the loss of fine touch and proprioception (known as dissociated sensory loss) is usually caused by a lesion on a single tract of the spinal cord. (verywell.com)
  • Despite a century-long debate about efference copy versus sensory reafference the question whether visual localization relies on the corollary discharge ( von Helmholtz, 1925 ) or eye proprioception ( Sherrington, 1918 ) is still unanswered and experimental observations seem contradictory. (jneurosci.org)
  • peripheral
  • Building on the one hand on the link between immersion and peripheral vision, and on the other hand on the visually induced perceptual illusion of self-motion (vection), the author examines synesthesia through the relationship between peripheral vision and proprioception. (jhu.edu)
  • body
  • Proprioception is an automatic sensitivity mechanism in the body that sends messages through the central nervous system (CNS). (fitter1.com)
  • Effects of whole-body cryotherapy (-110 ┬░C) on proprioception and indices of muscle damage. (nih.gov)
  • I am wondering whether proprioception applied to the whole body is the substance to which you really apply your Yi. (yangfamilytaichi.com)
  • To do this, I am positing that you use proprioception to be aware of the placement, condition, and movement of all parts of your body and feel how this placement, condition, and movement relates to your immediate goal. (yangfamilytaichi.com)
  • we have re-examined the question of whether eye proprioception contributes to locating stimuli in relation to the body in a patient (R.W.) with a focal lesion of the postcentral gyrus. (jneurosci.org)
  • Search
  • Using Sherrington's system, physiologists and anatomists search for specialised nerve endings that transmit mechanical data on joint capsule, tendon and muscle tension (such as Golgi tendon organs and muscle spindles ), which play a large role in proprioception. (wikipedia.org)
  • effect
  • To evaluate the effect of resistance training on proprioception, community dwelling older women completed a three-month exercise study. (iupui.edu)
  • Control
  • DC Simpson and others, The choice of control system for the multimovement prosthesis: extended physiological proprioception (epp) The control of upper-extremity prostheses and orthoses C. Thomas (1974) Dick H. Plettenburg, ``Prosthetic control: a case for Extended Physiological Proprioception. (wikipedia.org)
  • MEC '02 The Next Generation, Proceedings of the 2002 MyoElectric Controls/Powered Prosthetics Symposium IBME, University of New Brunswick (2002) http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2669 Doubler JA, Childress, DS, An analysis of extended physiological proprioception as a prosthesis-control technique. (wikipedia.org)
  • concept
  • Extended physiological proprioception (EPP) is a concept pioneered by D.C. Simpson (1972) to describe the ability to perceive at the tip of a tool, in this case a prosthetic limb. (wikipedia.org)
  • slow
  • Two contradictory models have been suggested about how these two sources contribute to visual localization: (1) only the efference copy is used whereas proprioception is a slow recalibrator of the forward model, and (2) both signals are used together as a weighted average. (jneurosci.org)