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  • historians
  • In particular, we examine how reputations are constructed by the public and by historians, and how scandals (including contemporary ones) come to be understood. (northwestern.edu)
  • Since 1970, historians' renewed interest in cultural history, including the relationship between elite society and the underclasses and the historical deconstruction of modern institutions, has inspired a reexamination of the role of diseases in history. (uvm.edu)
  • The history of the Black Death and the repeated three century assault on European society by bubonic plague have offered historians working within an interdisciplinary approach an opportunity to examine the origin of modern public health institutions and their role in creating modern discourse on the relationship between infectious disease and society. (uvm.edu)
  • broader social
  • In the second unit, we will examine cultural "reurbanization" and the shift towards broader social acceptance of a white homonormativity which casts of minorities as homophobic or "backward" in the march toward greater social progress. (northwestern.edu)
  • What needs to be underlined is that youth should be conceptualized and studied as agents of positive peace in terms of addressing not only the challenges of physical violence, but also the challenges of structural and cultural violence, and the broader social change processes to transform violent, oppressive and hierarchical structures, as well as behaviour, relationships and attitudes into more participatory and inclusive ones. (sustainablesecurity.org)
  • 1991
  • Formed in the late 1980s, the ELCA adopted in 1991 a foundational social statement ('The Church in Society: A Lutheran Perspective') which situates this church's moral life in a 'diverse, divided, and threatened global society on a beautiful, fragile planet. (elca.org)
  • The motivation to maintain and enhance a positive conception of oneself is a major dynamic of many contemporary self-theories (Gecas 1991). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Theory
  • University of Chicago, Chicago Centre for Contemporary Theory. (syr.edu)
  • Students will improve their analytical skills by drawing connections between social science theory, historical monographs, memoirs of genocide survivors, journalistic accounts, policy documents, documentaries and public debates on foreign intervention. (northwestern.edu)
  • Based on Charles Cooley's (1902) influential concept of the looking-glass self and George H. Mead's (1934) theory of role taking as a product of symbolic interaction, reflected appraisals emphasize the essentially social character of the self (i.e., that our self-conceptions reflect our perceptions of the judgments of others, especially significant others, in our environment). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Time also provide templates for academic theory -- anthropological theory of the past, for example, depicted societies in an evolutionary continuum from primitive to modern. (northwestern.edu)
  • 1995
  • In a 1995 social statement on peace and a 1999 statement on economic life, the ELCA sets out normative positions, which carry forward the early environmental statement. (elca.org)
  • This article discusses some of the contents of this book and was presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Interdisciplinary Research in Values and Social Change in Nashville, Tennessee in June, 1995. (lifeissues.net)
  • rhetoric
  • They highlight how extensively this dehumanizing rhetoric has taken over in contemporary society. (lifeissues.net)
  • Among all the Republican candidates' rhetoric about the necessity to create jobs and get people back to work, there is never a reference to racism and its impact on our society. (racismreview.com)
  • Although much contemporary Republican rhetoric is ostensibly designed to encompass everyone, their speeches are sprinkled with euphemisms and code words that reinforce stereotypes about people of color and the poor, e.g. dwelling on concepts of welfare, food stamps, immigrants, and miscreants who are supposedly sapping the strength of this nation. (racismreview.com)
  • innovation
  • Probably the most significant trend in historical scholarship has been a paradigmatic shift from viewing infectious disease epidemics as natural obstacles to be overcome to a view of human societies and their habitats as parts of an evolving and interactive ecosystem in which human innovation and culture play an integral, rather than dialectical, role. (uvm.edu)
  • Three trends in the contemporary cooperative movement provide possible avenues for enabling innovation and inter-cooperative coordination. (geo.coop)
  • Culture
  • Farrimond makes clear that the figure of the femme fatale is a remarkably resilient and malleable formulation that poses questions about girls, women, sexuality and power in an accessible and popular form, and through the very repetitive nature of her actions makes clear 'the limited options for [female] empowerment and agency in contemporary American culture' (14). (lse.ac.uk)
  • Yet, as Farrimond persuasively argues, the issues that the femme fatale raises for feminist criticism - such as how female sexuality is linked to mystery and duplicity, whether sexuality can be a legitimate route to empowerment and how much female sexuality expresses authentic desire in patriarchy - resonate still in contemporary culture. (lse.ac.uk)
  • For the many problems that plague contemporary culture, Swami said there is no "magic bullet solution. (wcuquad.com)
  • practice
  • This essay examines the social thought and practice of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and argues that this church deserves a largely positive appraisal. (elca.org)
  • context
  • The "Black Death" (1348-51), though devastating, was only a prelude to nearly four centuries of deadly, random, and rapidly-spreading bubonic plague epidemics which helped to shape the context within which European society became "modern. (uvm.edu)
  • In England, I argue, the concept of public health evolved within an ideology of the common weal, where personal conduct became a public issue and a matter of civic conscience in the context of government efforts to combat recurring bubonic plague epidemics. (uvm.edu)
  • psychiatry
  • Therefore, the proper role of psychiatry and psychology (and supporting social organizations) for those who are dissatisfied with their same-sex attraction is not to help them change - even if they wish to - but to help them to become comfortable with their homosexuality. (stjohndc.org)
  • Years
  • Two years later, in a social statement on the environment, the ELCA speaks of 'the urgency' with which humanity must act to address various threats to a sustainable future which spring from and intensify longstanding social injustices. (elca.org)
  • For ten years I also taught on, and examined, the History of Medicine Diploma run by the Society of Apothecaries, London. (open.ac.uk)
  • Life
  • Rugby is a focal point of social life in New Zealand where the national side, the All Blacks, have won the last two World Cups and where their losses have been linked to increases in domestic violence. (rugby365.com)
  • Of particular interest will be society\'s views of the ordering and pacing of life events. (northwestern.edu)
  • As a sociologist and community organizer (also disparaged occupations among some segments of society), I would like to share a few facts that I hope will cause them to reconsider their aversion to the subject and become engaged in a discussion about fairness and the quality of life here. (racismreview.com)
  • order
  • I intend to show how the "principle of segregation" became institutionalized in Renaissance plague control efforts and created an environment in which the plague became an expected, though unpredictable, natural disaster which reinforced inequities in the social order. (uvm.edu)
  • The problem cheap an order essay of infrastructure design. (mpacuk.org)
  • Disease
  • New diseases, such as AIDS, coupled with the recent assaults on the notion of "progress," have revealed tensions between individual rights and the public interest and inspired the search for the historical origins of western assumptions about the social dimensions of disease. (uvm.edu)
  • The first section of this paper will examine issues raised in modern epidemiology and current historiography of disease and consider the European plague response in light of those issues. (uvm.edu)
  • Though the English institutional response to bubonic plague lagged behind those on the Continent, the English experience laid a foundation for liberal democratic understandings of the social dimensions of disease and institutionalized the ethical dilemmas we face presently as new diseases have created post-modern challenges to public health. (uvm.edu)
  • Associated with this changing view of the man-nature dualism has been a growing tendency to view the development of public health strategies as instruments of social control, which protected the security of elite society rather than emancipating the underprivileged classes from the conditions that created disease, famine, and poverty. (uvm.edu)
  • In this paper, we look at disgust and disease avoidance behaviour in human individuals and in human social groups as an adaptive system. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Cooperative
  • In the USA, new social enterprises have adopted many features of this model, e.g., the United Steel Workers plan to partner with Mondragon in developing union-based worker cooperatives, and the Evergreen Cooperative network in Cleveland, but these initiatives will need lots more time before their long term success can be assessed. (geo.coop)
  • among
  • Introductory Note: This document represents the results of several months of writing and discussion among the membership, a draft paper, and revision by the Students for a Democratic Society national convention meeting in \cf2 Port Huron\cf0 , Michigan, June 11-15, 1962. (jewwatch.com)
  • essentially
  • Using such a "writer" has a particular problem in that the very idea of an intelligent western-educated person being in such a position does not fit with the common need to see IS supporters as essentially insane. (oxfordresearchgroup.org.uk)
  • current
  • In each offering, the problem addressed will be selected from and the results contribute to current faculty research initiatives. (wpi.edu)
  • Research
  • In such demographic realities, the potential youths hold for change and positive action is the subject of growing research agenda, and this is particularly the case with the recent wave of social upheavals and humanitarian crises in different parts of the world. (sustainablesecurity.org)
  • world
  • The problem is that only a tiny minority of wild plants and animals lend themselves to domestication, and those few are concentrated in about half a dozen parts of the world. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • In an innovative ecological approach to human history, William McNeill's Plagues and Peoples (1976) integrated epidemiology with world history. (uvm.edu)
  • If classic noir criticism holds that the femme fatale proved an effective way to express fears about women's increased social and political power following the granting of suffrage and their greater workplace presence due to World War Two, so, implicitly at least, here we find the femme fatale used to address various contemporary issues. (lse.ac.uk)
  • history
  • This paper will trace the history of these tensions and the origin of modern concepts of public health and social medicine in the early modern European experience with bubonic plague. (uvm.edu)
  • The impact of such alternative realities on society and history cannot be discounted. (northwestern.edu)
  • Women
  • The Graduate Center, CUNY, Center for the Study of Women and Society. (syr.edu)
  • Colonial impoverishment of Indian society, man's inherent urge to dominate woman, alien invasions-all these have resulted in the dethroning of women in Indian society from the place she deserves in a just society. (hvk.org)
  • The statement seems hyperbolic, but society still expects career women to be primary care givers. (columbia.edu)
  • As 2018 emerges as a watershed year for the position of women in cinema, following the allegations about Harvey Weinstein, the #metoo and #timesup campaigns and some of the world's most famous female actors discussing endemic problems of sexual abuse in the film industry, Katherine Farrimond's thorough, well-argued and convincing book, The Contemporary Femme Fatale: Gender, Genre and America Cinema , is an especially important and significant read. (lse.ac.uk)
  • From the caustic wit of Margaret Atwood to the biting social realism of Joan Didion and the tough humanity of Alice Walker, women have infused a new realism into fiction. (csmonitor.com)
  • Paralleling the movement itself, women have shifted the novel's focus from self to society. (csmonitor.com)
  • In widening their social canvas, however, women never relinquished the eye that make that perspective unique. (csmonitor.com)
  • natural
  • Natural selection has produced a solution to the problem of hard-to-detect parasites by designing a system that is sensitive to local information about infection risk. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • look
  • From one of our most exciting thinkers, the most prescient and engaging look at the problems we face since Alvin Toffler's Future Shock . (powells.com)
  • examine
  • The second part of the paper will examine how these themes were expressed in early modern England, where the plague was increasingly represented as a problem in social and environmental control. (uvm.edu)
  • American
  • With his classics of social commentary The Geography of Nowhere and Home from Nowhere , James Howard Kunstler has established himself as one of the great commentators on American space and place. (powells.com)
  • Are American churches developing adequate social ethics for such times and such a task? (elca.org)
  • conference
  • In 1962, a cadre of leftwing Jewish students grabbed control of the Students for a Democratic Society at the Conference in Port Huron, Michigan. (jewwatch.com)
  • time
  • It must be emphasized that the precedence of a society's war- making potential over its other characteristics is not the result of the 'threat' presumed to exist at any one time from other societies. (educate-yourself.org)
  • Technology
  • The problem teaching for written application letter was researched in the encyclopedia, with any previous technology, images placed side by itself. (mvhm.org)
  • impact
  • The long-term problem in Iraq goes beyond the immediate confessional divisions and is rooted in the impact of a bitter seven-year war. (oxfordresearchgroup.org.uk)
  • We might deliberately ignore, or avoid, or fail to feel all other human problems, but not these two, for these were too immediate and crushing in their impact, too challenging in the demand that we as individuals take the responsibility for encounter and resolution. (jewwatch.com)
  • understanding of the links between biological systems, biotechnology applications and their impact on society. (wpi.edu)
  • Western
  • The reacting feminine spirit has basically aped the masculine values already entrenched in Western society. (hvk.org)
  • University
  • Dr. William Brennan is a sociologist and professor in the School of Social Service at St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. (lifeissues.net)
  • responsibility
  • Independence from others and responsibility for others, such as taking care of a family or household, can be seen as defining markers of pre-requisites of social adulthood. (sustainablesecurity.org)
  • E. At least two of which are fully committed to social responsibility. (mpacuk.org)
  • fact
  • In fact, Baumeister (2001) suggest that society is doing more of a disservice by not tying praise to performance, and by doling out praise when it is not earned. (encyclopedia.com)